Undertaking Road Traffic Accident Work

Nitroexpress

Well-Known Member
Are there any members that do road traffic accident work (humane dispatch) for the police or local council and if so whats the score?!

I have been shooting for years now and if there is an incident near to where I live, local people usually call me to sort out wounded muntjac deer after they hit them with their cars.


One from last night - the car which hit it did'nt look great either!

Question 1) How do you stand legally if you are not registered as the 'dispatch man' - I usually use a knife or take the deer to private property (if its not already there) - as I know most of the land owners & it usually only takes a quick phone call to gain permission to shoot something wounded on thier land.

Question 2) Although I feel its almost my duty as a deer stalker to help out when I can - if I register with the police / council should I be charging for my service ~ when your in bed or out for a meal and the phone rings and you have to go and sort a deer out, usually in winter, in the dark & when its rainning ~ it aint what I would call fun.

Question 3) Do you need special insurance? I bet my BASC insurance would'nt cover dispatching deer for the police on the side of the road! (thats if its legal and the case if you are instructed to do so)

I do quite a few after the clocks change in winter (usually in places where they cant be stalked / controlled) that I have gainned the correct tools of the trade for the job and even have a little bag ready to go with my gear ~ the question is should I make it formal?


Nitro.......
 

Oh6

Well-Known Member
Question 3) Do you need special insurance? I bet my BASC insurance would'nt cover dispatching deer for the police on the side of the road! (thats if its legal and the case if you are instructed to do so)


BASC do offer additional insurance (for no extra charge), but you have to apply for it in addition to your standard membership.

Humane Despatch of Animals - Insurance Information & Form

As to your other questions different police forces have different policies as as who they call to deal with deer rtas, but that isn't something that I have experience of, like you I have just dealt with a few that I have discovered or friends/neighbours have called me about.
 

jimo

Well-Known Member
Hi Dale

We covered this a fair bit whilst doing DSC1 a copule of weeks ago. The advice we were given was if doing any was to register the with police to do it officially as members of the pulic with no knowledge can be watching. The RSPCA prosectuted some one for dispatching a wounded deer on the roadside with a knife following a complint from a spectator.

Jim
 

Nitroexpress

Well-Known Member
Hi Dale

We covered this a fair bit whilst doing DSC1 a copule of weeks ago. The advice we were given was if doing any was to register the with police to do it officially as members of the pulic with no knowledge can be watching. The RSPCA prosectuted some one for dispatching a wounded deer on the roadside with a knife following a complint from a spectator.

Jim
If done right a knife is 9 times out of 10 better than using a pistol and much safer - I hope common sense came into play and the person who dispatched the deer was let off. Proberly the only person there which knows what to do - the public I deal with are usually happy that someone can handle the situation.
 

jimo

Well-Known Member
If done right a knife is 9 times out of 10 better than using a pistol and much safer - I hope common sense came into play and the person who dispatched the deer was let off. Proberly the only person there which knows what to do - the public I deal with are usually happy that someone can handle the situation.
Thats the worrying bit. Common sense did not come into it and the RSPCA were sucessfull with their prosecution. Most folk are sensible but it only takes one prat to cause a lot of grief.
 

stalkerboydy

Well-Known Member
If done right a knife is 9 times out of 10 better than using a pistol and much safer -

And imho that is where alot of people kick up a Fuss "using a knife" believe it or not my first rta i was called to was for that said reason, a local Stalker/keeper was going to use a Knife god knows why. If asked to attend one i allways take my Rifle and .410 shotgun and the .410 is the one i use 99.9% But this has allready has been covered on the forum before.
 

Nitroexpress

Well-Known Member
I'm not keen on using a rifle unless its making an exit on three legs at a distance or something like that - I know of a guy who shot a wounded boar at close range after the dog man had tracked it down. With the dog man / dog standing next to him (in a position we all would have thought to be safe) he dispatched the animal only for the dog near his feet to roll over dead! A piece of jacket had come back at them and when striaght through the heart of the dog killinging it instantly. That a true story and something I always think about because that bullet will penetrate an animal so eaisly and if it hits something hard behind pieces of bullet are going to go somewhere - maybe back through and into you or someone else!

Knife or humane dispatch pistol - its need not be a 'spectator sport' and maybe best if you just say do you mind standing over there (out of sight) while I dispatch it humanely & respectfully.

RSPCA - these guys are trying to relieve suffering not cause it, no dout they would try and put wheels on a munti's back end feed it with a dropper or something - bloody do gooders ~ spend some time with the people who know and respect deer and you will learn a thing or two!
 

jubnut

Well-Known Member
+1 Boyd.

How is a Knife safer 9 times out of 10 than a pistol/Humane killer? Are you using it right?

On the subject of the RSPCA, Don't tar them all with the same brush - I have dealt with a few of them and to be honest for every bad one there is a down to earth one that you can get on and work with.
 

roedeerred

Well-Known Member
its a b***** minefield if you are willing to do it let the police invite you to help.been doing it for years but some forces like to use there own people even if they are not trained properly most police I find are not trained in anatomy of the animals.stalkers with experiance are much better but ensure you have insurance and explain to any attending officers what you need from them try to get jo public out of the way !
 

Apache

Well-Known Member
Everyone seems to want to do this and it's really not that much fun. You're dealing with situations with upset emotionally charged people and sometimes you're on your own with no police etc. .410 is the tool of choice.

If the police or the RSPCA want me to do this then they have to pay. Think this is why a lot of these 'groups' have been set up, because they do it for free.

A knife is messy and I think worse for the public to see. if someone was prosecuted they must have been making a real hash of it because any humane means of euthanasia is allowed by law.

Make sure you are insured.
 

RoeHunter

Well-Known Member
The RSPCA prosectuted some one for dispatching a wounded deer on the roadside with a knife following a complint from a spectator.
Jim
Jimo, you quoted the above as if you have first hand information on this. I in particular would be grateful if you could provide us with a link to the relevent proscution. Thank you in anticipation regards RoeHunter.
 

jimo

Well-Known Member
Jimo, you quoted the above as if you have first hand information on this. I in particular would be grateful if you could provide us with a link to the relevent proscution. Thank you in anticipation regards RoeHunter.
I was quoting the advice we were given doing DCS1 with the BDS at the begginging of the month. We were told about the prosecution by one of the instructors as an example of how you can be doing the most humane and sensible thing for an injured animal but still get yourself into hot water because of the views of others. The story was (as we were told it) that the deer was dispatched by a passer by but the spectator wanted to wait for a vet to arrive to put it too sleep, therfore prolonging the animals suffering.
We were told repeatdly that if we were prepared to get involved with roadside dispatch to register with the police. That way you are there in an official capacity and less likley to get into bother.
Perhapse I should have put "alledgedly" in front of my statement but I assume my scource of information was reliable.
Jim
 

RoeHunter

Well-Known Member
I was quoting the advice we were given doing DCS1 with the BDS at the begginging of the month. We were told about the prosecution by one of the instructors as an example of how you can be doing the most humane and sensible thing for an injured animal but still get yourself into hot water because of the views of others. The story was (as we were told it) that the deer was dispatched by a passer by but the spectator wanted to wait for a vet to arrive to put it too sleep, therfore prolonging the animals suffering.
We were told repeatdly that if we were prepared to get involved with roadside dispatch to register with the police. That way you are there in an official capacity and less likley to get into bother.
Perhapse I should have put "alledgedly" in front of my statement but I assume my scource of information was reliable.
Jim
Jim, thank you for your reply, as someone who is called out often by the RSPCA (and the Police) to deal with RTC, I am very surprised to hear what you were told on your recent DCS1 course.

I will investigate further with my contacts in both the RSPCA and at the BDS HO to see if there is any substance in what you have been told.

Regards RoeHunter
 

Nitroexpress

Well-Known Member
if someone was prosecuted they must have been making a real hash of it because any humane means of euthanasia is allowed by law
How come there is so much negatively regarding using a knife - I thought there was a minimum distance you had to maintain from the centre of a road to discharge a firearm legally and my instructor on a DSC level 2 stalk made a point to ask me to show him how I approach and dispatch a deer and how I would use a knife - if needed too!

The less fuss, noise and bullets flying the better for me. There are no fallow, sika or wild reds in my local area and little munti's don't take much to dispatch them quickly and humanly.
 

2130martin

Well-Known Member
Everyone seems to want to do this and it's really not that much fun. You're dealing with situations with upset emotionally charged people and sometimes you're on your own with no police etc. .410 is the tool of choice.

If the police or the RSPCA want me to do this then they have to pay. Think this is why a lot of these 'groups' have been set up, because they do it for free.

A knife is messy and I think worse for the public to see. if someone was prosecuted they must have been making a real hash of it because any humane means of euthanasia is allowed by law.


+1 to this post,i am a slaughterman by trade and have many years experience of being called out at all hours in all conditions to deal with all situations,you name them i have seen them...i would never use a knife,the public wouldnt understand and cause yourself too many potential problems.Always used a free bullet humane killer pistol or rifle if i couldnt get near to the animal.One day i started charging and the work(albeit voluntary) dried up, thank god!!....thanks to all of you keen deer stalkers for doing it instead,good boys!!!
I am a novice stalker and as i become more experienced the "call out" work is something a wont be bothering with,been there done that,seems to me to be no more than an ego trip,believe me the novelty does wear off!!

There are professionals that can do this work,leave it to them and then the authorities will have to pay,thats what i say......
 

stone

Well-Known Member
Are there any members that do road traffic accident work (humane dispatch) for the police or local council and if so whats the score?!

I have been shooting for years now and if there is an incident near to where I live, local people usually call me to sort out wounded muntjac deer after they hit them with their cars.


One from last night - the car which hit it did'nt look great either!

Question 1) How do you stand legally if you are not registered as the 'dispatch man' - I usually use a knife or take the deer to private property (if its not already there) - as I know most of the land owners & it usually only takes a quick phone call to gain permission to shoot something wounded on thier land.

Question 2) Although I feel its almost my duty as a deer stalker to help out when I can - if I register with the police / council should I be charging for my service ~ when your in bed or out for a meal and the phone rings and you have to go and sort a deer out, usually in winter, in the dark & when its rainning ~ it aint what I would call fun.

Question 3) Do you need special insurance? I bet my BASC insurance would'nt cover dispatching deer for the police on the side of the road! (thats if its legal and the case if you are instructed to do so)

I do quite a few after the clocks change in winter (usually in places where they cant be stalked / controlled) that I have gainned the correct tools of the trade for the job and even have a little bag ready to go with my gear ~ the question is should I make it formal?


Nitro.......
If i'm not mistaken there is no official regestre in your area
The only person that I know that gets called on upon by both Warwickshire and West Midlands was Howard Smith
Personally I would not deal with your Firearms depot on this or approach them
I would put your name forward with your local area vet
As the police call on them first for assistance on any animal involved RTC's
I charge a standard £40 call out fee which covers my time , fuel and disposal of any carcasses I need to dispose of
 

Apache

Well-Known Member
How come there is so much negatively regarding using a knife - I thought there was a minimum distance you had to maintain from the centre of a road to discharge a firearm legally and my instructor on a DSC level 2 stalk made a point to ask me to show him how I approach and dispatch a deer and how I would use a knife - if needed too!

The less fuss, noise and bullets flying the better for me. There are no fallow, sika or wild reds in my local area and little munti's don't take much to dispatch them quickly and humanly.
A knife is messy - there is a lot more blood involved. You going to carry a load of water to clean up afterwards. Not just the road but yourself, your knife etc. With a deer with antlers you are a stark raving lunatic if you approach it with a knife. Personally I would use a firearm every time.

Before anyone is granted a FAC or a SGC they should have to stand up, place their right hand on their heart and recite:

Section 161 of the Highways Act 1980 (England & Wales) makes it an offence to discharge a firearm within 50 ft of the centre of a highway with vehicular rights without lawful authority or excuse, if as a result a user of the highway is injured, interrupted or endangered.


I would put your name forward with your local area vet
As the police call on them first for assistance on any animal involved RTC's
I charge a standard £40 call out fee which covers my time , fuel and disposal of any carcasses I need to dispose of
Sounds like a good plan but if someone calls me [as a vet] to deal with an injured animal then I will attend. I could possibly be held responsible for another person messing it up or not turning up etc. I will attend but bill the police or RSPCA for the call. If a member of public rings direct I ask them to ring the police or RSPCA first.

If the police want to set up these schemes to save money best of luck to them.
 

widu13

Well-Known Member

Section 161 of the Highways Act 1980 (England & Wales) makes it an offence to discharge a firearm within 50 ft of the centre of a highway with vehicular rights without lawful authority or excuse, if as a result a user of the highway is injured, interrupted or endangered.
I don't do call outs either, but dispatch is a lawful excuse. BTW your S161 is incorrect. It does not have to have vehicular rights, a footpath is sufficient.
 

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