US hunter or UK stalker? You choose...

Cottis

Well-Known Member
100% UK is better for me. You get quantity and quality here, although I accept you do need access to land to make this possible.

The US has quality for sure and it would be cool to be outside in their great outdoors but I can shoot what i want when I want here as long as I observe the perfectly acceptable (in my view) seasons in the UK.

If I lived in the US, I would own way more guns and spend lots of time at a range I bet but my time spent actually hunting would be limited and I would not be ok with that.
 

Sheprador1973

Well-Known Member
I believe that the US have got a better set up where everyone has a fair chance to public land and a fair opportunity at hunting unlike over here where someone can tie up all the stalking and never go!!
There’s a limited amount of tags so that there can be quarry species for years to come I think this is a good idea however not much different to a managed set up over here.
I think there’s good and bad in both the UK and US. However I think they have more support for their way of life than we do. Everyone is out to get the UK hunter because it doesn’t sit well in their PC world. The sooner they wake up and realise we are a tiny country in a big world the better!
Plus, they have massive support from organisations and built into law to protect everything you said. We have BASC...and the media/general public dislike us. Most states do seem to have a very real grasp of the concept of conservation...even if a few hunting individuals
100% UK is better for me. You get quantity and quality here, although I accept you do need access to land to make this possible.

The US has quality for sure and it would be cool to be outside in their great outdoors but I can shoot what i want when I want here as long as I observe the perfectly acceptable (in my view) seasons in the UK.

If I lived in the US, I would own way more guns and spend lots of time at a range I bet but my time spent actually hunting would be limited and I would not be ok with that.
I kind of like that in some areas they make a 10-day wild camping holiday out of it and generally waste very few resources. That appeals, sleeping under the stars, 'processing' meat in the field (ever noticed how very few wear gloves etc?). Certainly a longer, arguably more complete experience? I think like you say Cottis, and others have alluded to, it's the access to land in a fair way that complicates the issue here in the UK.
 

devon deer stalker

Well-Known Member
Good Lord! I thought only the European Commission was allowed to create rules that complicated.
Yes and every state has its own quirky rules that should you fall foul of you could get a hefty fine, loss of hunting opportunities and prison time for the worst offences.
Best to own up early if you make a mistake.

Even though I have hunted Montana a few times, it's UK stalking for me.

As to tags that varies as well, and if the Elk start to breed out of control the state can issue extra tags called 'shoulder tags' so more can be shot.

Cheers

Richard
 

Sheprador1973

Well-Known Member
Yes and every state has its own quirky rules that should you fall foul of you could get a hefty fine, loss of hunting opportunities and prison time for the worst offences.
Best to own up early if you make a mistake.

Even though I have hunted Montana a few times, it's UK stalking for me.

As to tags that varies as well, and if the Elk start to breed out of control the state can issue extra tags called 'shoulder tags' so more can be shot.

Cheers

Richard
Didn't know about the shoulder tags thing mate...that's interesting. And yes, it seems very quirky to say the least!

Ps...you got a knife pic to show me yet?
:)
 

johngryphon

Well-Known Member
Now would this interest you blokes at all when comparing the hunting?

 

camodog

Well-Known Member
It would be interesting to ask US hunters the same question. Over the years I have made the acquaintance of a number of America sportsmen and women. Without exception they envied our freedom to hunt all year (around the seasons) with relatively few restraints. By and large there was a disdain for our (by comparison) stringent gun control laws. However, we do get to use ours whereas they had 'loads' of hardware but had relatively little opportunity to use them.
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
I kind of like that in some areas they make a 10-day wild camping holiday out of it and generally waste very few resources. That appeals, sleeping under the stars, 'processing' meat in the field (ever noticed how very few wear gloves etc?). Certainly a longer, arguably more complete experience?
No reason why you can't do that in the UK too.
Here's a couple of photos from my most recent trip, a couple of weeks ago:
DSC_1843.JPG
DSC_1845.JPG
Daughter sleeps in the tent, but I'm banished because I snore! I don't mind, as I'm quite happy under the stars on my camp bed. Nice to have the 243 out for an airing after using nothing but 270 for the past year. Nice to get a deer, too!
 

Dave881

Well-Known Member
That is a fair point Dickie. Theres a large area of land adjacent to some woods near my small perm that I have regularly seen herds of 70+ fallow grazing on in broad daylight. Slots everywhere. I eventually tracked down the landowner who said theres been some guy shooting it for years and he enjoys it so hes happy to leave him to it. But I've never seen him. Or heard a gunshot. Or a highseat. Or any evidence whatsoever that he actually visits. And his absence is borne out by the rapidly expanding deer numbers. Shame, as someone more dedicated or available could manage the area really well IMHO.
This is an all too common reality round where I am mate, been to many places asking about shooting only to be told 'we have someone who shoots here' to then find out they only go twice a year to shoot one animal for their own freezer and the place is heaving with deer and could really benefit from someone who wants to turn up regularly and do the job properly. I wouldn't be bothered if the land owners would give you a chance to do it but say that they don't want to let the other person down and that they will still be able to do their one or two days a year.
Dave
 

Sheprador1973

Well-Known Member
I have been watching a few of the American hunting programmes lately too, made me wonder if there is anywhere in America where you can shoot as many deer as you see fit? Similar to the UK setup, or is it all the hunting limited number of tags per season? (Not a comment on which setup is better btw, just a curiosity!)
I think, and I'm certainly no authority, that their 'pest species' such as hogs and turkeys for example are relatively free to be shot in numbers (sometimes with a full auto from a chopper). But big game animals, as in the deer species, you more or less buy a tag for that one particular animal. Think that's why in some of the vids you see they're quite choosy about the particular animal they shoot. Is it the best one to fill this tag, whether that be for meat or mounting a head on a wall. That's my limited understanding...
 

James0586

Well-Known Member
This is an all too common reality round where I am mate, been to many places asking about shooting only to be told 'we have someone who shoots here' to then find out they only go twice a year to shoot one animal for their own freezer and the place is heaving with deer and could really benefit from someone who wants to turn up regularly and do the job properly. I wouldn't be bothered if the land owners would give you a chance to do it but say that they don't want to let the other person down and that they will still be able to do their one or two days a year.
Dave
Same boat here mate
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
I watched film on youtube and the lady on there had waited 15 years for a bull elk tag not sure what state could of even been Canada
Elk tags are available over the counter in Alberta and the season is 3 months long . We do have the draw system for some animals like sheep but it isn't hard to get drawn . Some areas are more popular than others , so the competition for some zones can be higher .

AB
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
Interesting thread . The hunting ( we don't use the term stalking here ) situation is different here from both the UK and the US . The biggest difference between Alberta and the UK is the fact that we don't manage game numbers here , except under unusual circumstances , we manage hunters . As stalker308 , who's hunted with me and my family for about 6 years now , points out , the game densities are low compared to the UK . If game populations get too low , usually from Wolf predation or wildfires , we shut that area down to hunting . We have large areas with intact ecosystems , that means less animals per square mile . The UK , for the most part , is largely farm land or areas with a lot of human activity , and more importantly , no large predators , something that has a huge impact on game populations . As stalker308 can attest , I've hunted in one area for a number of years . It had incredibly high numbers of Moose , Elk and both species of deer . As usually happens when prey species numbers get high , the predator numbers go up as well . Eventually the predator numbers get too high and they decimate the prey species , then the predator numbers also go through the floor , that is how nature works . The above mentioned zone has one of the lowest game densities in northern Alberta now , it will recover in a few years and the cycle will start again . Obviously , that wouldn't work in the UK . You do have longer seasons in the UK and are able to shoot far more animals , which is a definite plus . We can take up to seven white tails here over a four month season , Elk season runs for the same amount of time as do most other species and we have spring bear for three months as well as an additional three months in fall . Some areas can be difficult to get drawn for , Moose specifically . If you really need to shoot a Moose , you apply in the northern zones , you will get drawn . If you want to hunt closer to home , where most people go , it will take longer to get drawn . You can pretty much hunt one or another large game species year round here , it depends on how much effort you are willing to put in . You can , for example , hunt Buffalo year round in some parts of Alberta , but it isn't something to undertake lightly . You will be in some of the last true wilderness on earth with no help within hundreds of miles and 2000 lbs of dead shaggy head to deal with , you will earn every pound of meat , trust me . Long story short , before this turns into a novel , I couldn't say which is better . It is pretty subjective . I like hunting in remote areas where there isn't another hunter for 100 miles , I also love hunting farm land for White-Tails , I even hunted Iguanas in the Yucatan years ago , it was great ( and they're delicious ) In other words , if it blows your hair back , it's all good .

AB
 
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alberta boy

Well-Known Member
I agree. But unless I'm wrong, and just as an example, Colorado's muzzle loader seasons is 8 days every year.
It varies from state to state , or in our case , province to province . Our Muzzle loader season runs for about 8 months , we also have designated primitive weapon areas that run longer and allow you to take additional animals .

AB
 

Dickie

Well-Known Member
As for bits of ground that are only shot very lightly. If the landowner and the stalker are happy then that's all that matters. I personally feel we need this places and bits that are not shot at all.
We have plenty of that, most wildlife groups have no shooting policies and various other group, charities too often to the detriment of the deer population, LACS on Exmoor being one example
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
I really think the US have the correct approach to public lands. They have proper wildlife scientists and game rangers who know and understand wildlife management and also sustainable harvesting, whether it be game, timber or fish in the sea. They set a quota for the harvest and for game its either an over the counter tag or a draw / lottery. You buy or draw a tag and these are generally very specific to one particular land block and one particular animal. Ie a six point buck, or a ten year old ram which a 360 degree curl.

Some areas open to residents only, others ti non residents. Some will stipulate you must be guided. Others self guided. Many states now require showing hunter proficiency as well.

Often seasons are quite short, but they do have a number of seasons in any one year. And seasons vary according to game populations.

And once you have shot your animal you have to take it to the ranger station for measurement and inspection.

I cant help feeling this a very good and Democratic way of managing public lands.

Now just imagine if public land - ie Forestry Commision ( or whatever its called this week) in the UK was like this???? Instead of spending £m’s on Rangers - turn up, show your paperwork - FAC, Level 2 and insurance - buy a tag to shoot a 10 point red stag in such and such an area. And your tag is for three days. Off you go. Limited number of tags so not a free for all. If you dont find a ten pint in that period - well you go home empty.
 

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