Vanax stainless steel promotion knife write up

Peter Eaton

Well-Known Member
Some of you will be aware I was asked to make a knife by Uddeholm UK in order to promote the Swedish steel makers latest steel which I posted a few months back. Here is the write up by Scott Cottrell the UK component business manager and myself which was 'picked up' by the Swedish head quarters for worldwide release on LinkedIn this last week.

 

johngryphon

Well-Known Member
Though as with any knife I will always think I should have done something different lol

Can I offer Peter? Just my own personal opine is that the shoulders of the scales at blade end were a bit too sharp ...I stress "for me" too as its not a criticism.

Anyway we can do a deal,I will take you deer hunting downunder for a knife...one day!
 

Peter Eaton

Well-Known Member
Though as with any knife I will always think I should have done something different lol

Can I offer Peter? Just my own personal opine is that the shoulders of the scales at blade end were a bit too sharp ...I stress "for me" too as its not a criticism.

Anyway we can do a deal,I will take you deer hunting downunder for a knife...one day!
Criticism always welcome John, if you cant take it then you shouldn't be making something.

Ok with regards the shoulders do you mean where the front of the scale meets the top, or the angle it was cut at?

The two angles that meet I always do a crisp meeting of both surfaces in order the blade looks precise when viewed from the side, ie. the spine of the knife facing you. It also ensures when the sheath is made for a knife that the sheath 'clicks' into place when it goes into the sheath as also this knife just had a safety cover sheath. If the edges are rounded it doesn't look as precise to me and as though the maker has rounded them in order to hide an error when the front scale angles were cut as the eyes would wander as opposed to being fixed when viewing a precise angle.

Also with that knife I wanted a that area 'sharp' as it was for a modern steel and if I can get the photo to upload you will see the pattern runs up the face of the scale the goes sharply backwards which you can see in this image. Although it might look a sharper different angle than it actually is in the phoos.
 

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Peter Eaton

Well-Known Member
Criticism always welcome John, if you cant take it then you shouldn't be making something.

Ok with regards the shoulders do you mean where the front of the scale meets the top, or the angle it was cut at?

The two angles that meet I always do a crisp meeting of both surfaces in order the blade looks precise when viewed from the side, ie. the spine of the knife facing you. It also ensures when the sheath is made for a knife that the sheath 'clicks' into place when it goes into the sheath as also this knife just had a safety cover sheath. If the edges are rounded it doesn't look as precise to me and as though the maker has rounded them in order to hide an error when the front scale angles were cut as the eyes would wander as opposed to being fixed when viewing a precise angle.

Also with that knife I wanted a that area 'sharp' as it was for a modern steel and if I can get the photo to upload you will see the pattern runs up the face of the scale the goes sharply backwards which you can see in this image. Although it might look a sharper different angle than it actually is in the photos
 

johngryphon

Well-Known Member
Peter I reacted to the look in this photo belo that shows no rake at all but i see in the pic above that there is a rake to it.


I reiterate Peter ".I stress "for me" too as its not a criticism."

vanax.jpg
 

Peter Eaton

Well-Known Member
Peter I reacted to the look in this photo belo that shows no rake at all but i see in the pic above that there is a rake to it.


I reiterate Peter ".I stress "for me" too as its not a criticism."

View attachment 135371
Hi John, by rake do you mean the sloping angle of the scale at the front? If so you cannot really see it in the first photo and only slightly on the other image I posted.
It doesn't really show that well on the photos though. The angle on that knife though was slightly less than I do with sometimes but it is more than appears in the images so I can see what you mean.

No problems regarding you critiquing the knife as any feed back will always help me.

I always try to take as detailed images as I can of my knives as a quality picture shows a maker isn't 'hiding' a blemish for example, though I have had images that I have done which when posted looked like there was a tiny blemish when there.....but it was just a light flare.

Knives are notoriously difficult to photo but even in a bad photo scratches which shouldn't be there are easy to see....just enlarge the image.

I am just getting ready to hand finish the surfaces of two knives that have been sat in my workshop which I couldn't work on due to being on morphine for sciatica, it doesn't go well with blades :oops:.

So lots of coffee in a flask as it will mean several hours stood at the bench hand sanding, I get through sheets of the stuff on one blade, bloody hard work where Elmax is concerned but hugely satisfying when done correctly.

Thanks for your honesty in your comment. :thumb:

Pete
 
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johngryphon

Well-Known Member
, by rake do you mean the sloping angle of the scale at the front?

Yes but the sloping angle is not so apparent on first sighting the original pic and to me it just looked a little raw on that edge.

It doesn't really show that well on the photos though.

It does in the subsequent photos though and can be clearly seen,even by a dolt like me ha ha.


Pete I use my old knives for what they are made for (work) and in reality the actual "look"is not as important as the functionality is and I was just gobbing off!

Anyway its all good for you and your beaut knives mate.
 

Longstrider

Well-Known Member
Interesting. I note that you had to work the blank in a fully hardened state. Is the steel only available in full hardened state ? If not, then what would the HT regime be for it ? Doing the whole job on a heat treated blank is making hard work of it if the option exists to work on the steel in an annealed state and then HT after shaping and grinding is completed as you would with any other steel.
 

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