Waste of money?

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#1
I occasionally pop a tin of wet dog food in with the dry diet. Is this stuff nutricious as they advertise it to be?
 

weeman

Well-Known Member
#3
I do what mossypaw does. How ever I'm changing my dogs food. They are on canagan at present but becoming to expensive at £30 a month for 4kg. I prefer to feed them a cereal grain free etc food contain a high percentage level of meat. Most seem to be around the 25% meat content but with new variety like canagan being 80% there is roughly at additional £10 extra per kilo which equates to a lot more money. Pets at home are doing a good percentage of a salmon one for really good money in think at 72% salmon content but meat wise massive difference in price.
 
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Yorric

Well-Known Member
#4
If you want to add variety to the diet, fresh cooked, oily fish or fresh meat is the way I recommend you add the appitizer value. Tinned oily fish in oil is good too.
There are so many vaiations & quality of raw materials in commercial wet & canned food to really make sense. - If you buy it fresh (or frozen) & prepare it yourself, you really know a bit more what you are giving.
The factory stuff must pass some quality standards & may be nutritious, but never forget the cause of the BSE problems. - Bad materials, not properly sterilized in production of feed.
I once went for an interview at Pedigree Petfoods factory for a job - after that experience , seeing the stinking, rubbish that they cooked up, I would not use their products! I'm far from squeamish but that really made me gyp!

Ian
 

stalker.308

Well-Known Member
#5
Personally I think you are wasting your money on canned wet dog food. People mistakingly think its meat in those tins.....just take a look at the label probably states about 4% meat so just what is the other 96% made up of in this tinned 'meat'?
 

tackb

Well-Known Member
#6
my sprocker has had nothing but dr johns silver working dog food all his life , it's dry and I soak it before feeding him. he has a great coat and is great nick.
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
#9
I occasionally pop a tin of wet dog food in with the dry diet. Is this stuff nutricious as they advertise it to be?
Yes. Essentially the same as your dry diet, but 70% water! I wouldn't bother, it's a nutritious sludge and sticks to the teeth more than the dried and anything that sticks to the teeth promotes dental disease.
There is more difference of opinion and less fact on feeding a dog/cat than perhaps any other area of veterinary work. All of the commercial brands are nutritious and balanced and most are fine for most dogs. Pick one, and stick to it.
All the stuff about "antioxidants" "immune strengthening" is nonsense
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
#12
I was going to buy a few tins to feed my dogs as a treat and extra energy at lunch time on the grouse.

If u look on the back it is 80 odd % water and if u look at the protein was really low too (think sub 10ish %)

I ended up buying one of those rolls of dog food (that look like lunchoen meat) only done it a few times, beter to just take some dried food up
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
#13
My two get Dr Johns Platinum with canned tripe daily. They also get raw pheasant & rabbit carcasses, plus the bones from both roe carcasses & the pork shoulders I regularly bone out. Plus carrots & apples as-and-when. I think dogs enjoy variety just as much as we do & ours certainly thrive on it :thumb:

I do recall reading somewhere that the meat that goes into dog food now has to be graded as fit for human consumption too?
 

andyf

Well-Known Member
#14
My dog's got some digestive problems at the moment as we're trying to find an adult dry food he likes and agrees with him. Spoke to the vet and he suggested using wet food (Chappie) in the meantime. He's not a big dog (~18kg) but was amazed when he said he'd need 2 tins a day. To me that answers the nutrition question quite emphatically. Also makes it more expensive than a quality dry food.

As it happens the dry food I'm waiting on is something call Ancestral Canine (http://www.ancestralcanine.co.uk). It's grain free which should be better for his guts and they also advocate supplementing it once or twice a week with raw offal (hearts for example), greens (kale, spinach, broccoli), blueberries, sardines. Basically some of the bits and pieces that would most likely make up some of the natural diet of their wild ancestors. All sounds very convincing but if the mutt still gets the squits I will keep looking!
 
#15
My dog is on dry food except when fresh meat is available. He gets any off cuts from venison, rabbit, and game birds after I have dealt with them + any bones after roasts etc. If the freezer is full he gets all the rabbit! We limit his dry food intake after this but as a terrier he is pretty self limiting and is a solid thing; all muscle very little fat. In answer to your question: probably. I wouldn't buy tinned 'meat'.
 

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