What grit for skinning knife.

Dietman

Member
I'm wondering what you find the best for carcass prep and skinning. Mirror polish (5000 grit plus) or a toothy edge (1000ish). My knife R2 steel thatch reference. I'm not sure. My last use was sharpened to 3000 grit. It worked well but your experience would be great.
 

trucraft

Well-Known Member
It’s personal thing really.
Anything that v sharps good.
I hardly ever sharpen my skinning knife. It doesn’t ever hit bone so I just use a homemade leather strop once or twice every deer.
 

muddy42

Well-Known Member
How are you sharpening and what profile? If any freehand method, I struggle to see how you can maintain the consistency of angle needed for the finer grits. I stop sharpening my scandi grinds at 600.
 

75

Well-Known Member
I don't think it matters for skinning. I use a tripe knife for a quick run up the inside of each front leg and anything I've got to hand to free off a bit of stubborn skin/membrane here and there, but the majority is done by hand not knife. Where you are freeing the skin from the meat I think there is a disadvantage in overly sharp - you want to be able to rub the blade over the skin so it frees off the attached membrane rather than cutting through the skin.
 

Rafter

Well-Known Member
This guy shoots ducks with my friends - he seems to do ok with just a steel and a cheapish set of made in NZ Victory knives.

 
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Dietman

Member
Yes. I'm over thinking it. Anything sharp will do.
Muddy 42: I've been sharpening for years freehand as a result of my chef work. No probs there.

I'm a relative greenhorn at skinning so hence the questions. Clearly the release of the hide with a few well placed cuts is key.

Thanks for your replies.
 

muddy42

Well-Known Member
@Dietman Yes I agree with that. Your mostly pulling the skin off with your hands. You only need a knife occasionally to release bits. Watch out there is a muscle half way down the haunch where the meat always tries to tear off with the skin.

I have given up trying to sharpen freehand, I simply cannot do it. I either use a lanksy for flat grinds or this for scandi grinds:
 

Dietman

Member
To become consistent when I sharpen or strop I become robotic in my movements. Practice helps and I find the process relaxing and really satisfying. There nothing like a scary sharp knife for use in the kitchen. They feel like they fall through food.
 
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