What is this and what is it for???

JockStalk

Well-Known Member
I've seen a number of rifles with what I presume to be threaded rods across the stock at the front of the receiver, as per the photo below.

My presumption is its to either strengthen the recoil lug in the stock or the stock itself - but would love to know from someone who actually does know!

Jim


a41_lot224_3-max.jpg
 

deerstalker.308

Well-Known Member
Its a recoil crossbolt, to stop movement of the action/stock etc.....


"Reinforcing Crossbolt - A steel bolt or square bar, mounted transversely through a rifle stock just under and behind the front (and sometimes rear) receiver ring, sometimes concealed in the wood and sometimes against which the action is carefully bedded. When properly fitted, it helps distribute the recoil and reinforces stock at the point where wood has been removed to accept the action. Reinforcing crossbolts can be recognized by the flush-mounted circular steel fittings on the side of the stock, but are sometimes finished with contrasting wooden plugs and sometimes concealed completely. Also called Recoil Crossbolt."
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
The direction of the wood fibres are wrong for the recoil lug area where quite strong forces are introduced. Not a single fibre goes left to right, same on plywood stocks. Hence the cross bolt to avoid the stock from splitting and to help distribute the recoil into the stock. Some modern stocks can have the reinforcements integrated. Saying that the cross bolts have done good service on heavy recoiling rifles and are proven since over 100 years I guess.
edi
 

JockStalk

Well-Known Member
Edi - I hadn't considered the orientation of the grain in a wood stock but that of course makes perfect sense.
Wouldn't look half as bonny if the wood was oriented the other way though!
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
Edi - I hadn't considered the orientation of the grain in a wood stock but that of course makes perfect sense.
Wouldn't look half as bonny if the wood was oriented the other way though!

:D yes of course you couldn't run the grain the other way because then the stock would snap elsewhere. I have often fixed cracked wooden stocks by adding glass or carbon fibres running across the grain to the similar effect of the cross bolt only it is the hidden when the rifle sits in the stock.
edi
 
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