What makes a good deerstalker

Leica Amplus 6
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Davie

Guest
What do you think makes a good deerstalker . For me the main ingredient patience and a sound knowledge of your quarries and the same of the terrain it is in. Also a few others but there the main ones i think.
 

re'M'ington

Well-Known Member
I would definitely agree with all that you say 6.5x55,and,would also add a 'Respect' for the quarry.A healthy respect for the beast that you are going to shoot has to be very high on my list,and,I could just as easy watch/photograph any/all of the quarry that I go in search of,and,it isn't just deer,I even respect the humble bunny or the woodpigeon that might only end up feeding my ferrets.I learned this as a slaughterman of some 20+ yrs and,it has stood me in good stead during all of my sporting outings as well..................Martin.

p.s. Oh,and 'Realtree'...........lol
 

legaleagle69

Well-Known Member
I entirely agree Markh was going to say exactly the same could never see Sherlock Holmes in black pvc unless he was going for a lemon entry with Dr Watson maybe :lol:
 

wadashot

Well-Known Member
What makes a good deerstalker?

One of the things i think as well as what has been said, is reading the sights and signs around you. Listening to other wildlife like a jay, crow, blackbird chinking or squirrel making alert sounds around. This can give you an indication of other wildlife around like a deer feeding or fox prowling.
Finding slots in grass where deer have passed through and how fresh they are.
Deerstalking is not just deerstalking, it`s reading the countryside around you and getting a feel for what might be around.

Hope this makes sense. :rolleyes:

wadas
 

smithp18

Well-Known Member
Hi wadas
Make makes sense to me,
I have been taking my son Seb out with me school hols and all that,
And the point I’m trying to make is he is 11 and never stops asking questions, the rule is he as to touch my leg slowly with a stick if he wants to ask something or if he sees something.
Well it never stops prod after prod.
We sit and spy areas in the woods from time to time listing to what’s happening all round and it tells you more than the binos will ever do, binos just confirm, of course they help when spying big areas from distance that’s when they come into there own.
Seb hears alarm sounds prod, the wind changes direction prod, something looks to be moving prod its great but none stop.
With the cover being so high it’s difficult in the woods stalking but he does well and to be honest he is every bit as good as me at finding footings and whether they fresh or a day or two old.
He’s quick to spot signs and deer damage to but only that signs of what else is or as been about so I must be doing something right.
But the one thing I hope to get across to Seb and the most important message is the respect for your surroundings and the wildlife and the importance of why there needs to be a healthy balance.
My dad has always said and he’s not religious at all and shot all is life,” god put all things on the plant for a reason but there has to be effective control not to many and not to few there’s a health balance”.
So to answer the question What makes a good deerstalker? Try to understand the environment that deer co inhabit with all wild life and that changes from area to area that’s why I personally enjoy travelling to different ground to see the differences.

Thanks :)

Smithy
 

paul k

Well-Known Member
Patience and observation combined with a love and respect for the countryside including obviously the deer.
 

wadashot

Well-Known Member
smithp18 said:
Hi wadas
Make makes sense to me,
I have been taking my son Seb out with me school hols and all that,
And the point I’m trying to make is he is 11 and never stops asking questions, the rule is he as to touch my leg slowly with a stick if he wants to ask something or if he sees something.
Well it never stops prod after prod.
We sit and spy areas in the woods from time to time listing to what’s happening all round and it tells you more than the binos will ever do, binos just confirm, of course they help when spying big areas from distance that’s when they come into there own.
Seb hears alarm sounds prod, the wind changes direction prod, something looks to be moving prod its great but none stop.
With the cover being so high it’s difficult in the woods stalking but he does well and to be honest he is every bit as good as me at finding footings and whether they fresh or a day or two old.
He’s quick to spot signs and deer damage to but only that signs of what else is or as been about so I must be doing something right.
But the one thing I hope to get across to Seb and the most important message is the respect for your surroundings and the wildlife and the importance of why there needs to be a healthy balance.
My dad has always said and he’s not religious at all and shot all is life,” god put all things on the plant for a reason but there has to be effective control not to many and not to few there’s a health balance”.
So to answer the question What makes a good deerstalker? Try to understand the environment that deer co inhabit with all wild life and that changes from area to area that’s why I personally enjoy travelling to different ground to see the differences.

Thanks :)

Smithy
Well done Smithy, sounds to me like you are setting that lad off in the right direction.
Aren`t they just so inquisitive. :lol:
Well done that man ;)

wadas
 

smithp18

Well-Known Member
Inquisitive is an understatement, Seb has is moments but he’s a good lad and keen,

You think you know most things until you take a switched on you man out and he cant half get me thinking and wondering, he challenges every bloody thing, but I like that and I do enjoy the little moneys company.

Smithy
:rolleyes: :rolleyes:
 

stone

Well-Known Member
smithy
just goes to show what a father and son bonding can acheive ;)
wait till he wants to start to learn to drive :lol: :lol:
nice one mate can't wait to hear about seb's first deer
 

legaleagle69

Well-Known Member
That may well be something you will have learn to do without in the future mate unless some of the "friends" of the sport get there act together. :rolleyes:
 

Roe Hunter

Well-Known Member
Agree with all of the above - knowledge of the quarry and other wildlife, fieldcraft, observation and ability to read the signs, patience, and respect for the quarry amd the countryside. As part of 'respect', I would also include knowing your own, and your rifle's limitations - having found injured deer on my patch that have been e.g. shot in the leg with .17HMR!

Rgds

RH
 
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