What should I do with the dead crows

Chasey

Well-Known Member
Normaly I shoot one or two crow with my 22LR and its not really an issue ( i just chuck the bodies in the hedge row for charley) but this w/end after seeing hundreds of crow last week i am going to set up a hide and deecs and have a proper go. I am sincerely hopeing to put a dent in the 500 Extreem Pidgen cartridges i just baught :D

I am hunting on a sheep farm so the farmer will be pleased with lambing iminent.

So god forbid i get a few what do you lot normaly do with the dead crows?

ATB

Mark
 

arron

Well-Known Member
if there are a lot I bag em up and take to the tip ,if its less than 25 or so throw them in the hedge , but not on footpath or owt like that , hope you get plenty , atb arron.
 

smullery

Well-Known Member
Normaly I shoot one or two crow with my 22LR and its not really an issue ( i just chuck the bodies in the hedge row for charley) but this w/end after seeing hundreds of crow last week i am going to set up a hide and deecs and have a proper go. I am sincerely hopeing to put a dent in the 500 Extreem Pidgen cartridges i just baught :D

I am hunting on a sheep farm so the farmer will be pleased with lambing iminent.

So god forbid i get a few what do you lot normaly do with the dead crows?

ATB

Mark
And there was I thinking that Corvids might not be dumb.
I would expect after a few dozen shots they might not be there ;)

Stan
 

Gunner223

Well-Known Member
If you havent got a rubbish dump near , bag them up and freeze them, and when they come round to empty your bins, drop a few bags in ive done hundreds that way
 

pinkfoot1

Well-Known Member
Crow Recipe Pluck and draw the crow, then take a fire brick on which you place a thick bacon rasher. Place dressed crow on top of bacon, wrap all in aluminium foil then into the oven. Cook for 40 minutes at 180 deg. C.

Remove from oven, discard the crow and eat the brick!
 

howa243

Well-Known Member
Crow Recipe Pluck and draw the crow, then take a fire brick on which you place a thick bacon rasher. Place dressed crow on top of bacon, wrap all in aluminium foil then into the oven. Cook for 40 minutes at 180 deg. C.

Remove from oven, discard the crow and eat the brick!
:lol:
 

private fraser

Well-Known Member
Interesting re the shot reaction / placement bit. I'd never have worked that out..not on the few that I manage to connect with.
Some of the birds looked a lonng way out and up too.
 

willowbank

Well-Known Member
1 rook it's a crow

hundreds of crows they are rooks
Its surprising how many shooters do not know a Rook from a Crow here in the south, more than 2 birds will normally be Rooks which are naturally gregarious and live in Rookeries whereas Crows are normally to be found in pairs. A pair of Crows will usually be territorial and live together in a single roofed nest (wait until she is sitting on eggs then take her out along with the nest at dusk)
A crow has a dark beak, dark beak=dark heart, the Rook has a grey beak. Crows will hunt out miles of hedgerows taking eggs, fledglings, nesting game birds etc. They will perch for hours in an old dead tree watching for nesting bird coming and going from the nest. The poor old Rook is often painted the villain yet feeds mainly on Leatherjackets from pastureland, sprouting and ears of maize etc, they do damage to crops but easily dissuaded by hanging a few dead ones on sticks in the fields affected.

regards WB
 

Paddy_SP

Well-Known Member
The poor old Rook is often painted the villain yet feeds mainly on Leatherjackets from pastureland, sprouting and ears of maize etc, they do damage to crops but easily dissuaded by hanging a few dead ones on sticks in the fields affected.

regards WB
Agreed - in some places where they've shot out all the rooks they've had to reintroduce them to save the grassland.
 

Jim xyz

Well-Known Member
Its surprising how many shooters do not know a Rook from a Crow here in the south, more than 2 birds will normally be Rooks which are naturally gregarious and live in Rookeries whereas Crows are normally to be found in pairs. A pair of Crows will usually be territorial and live together in a single roofed nest (wait until she is sitting on eggs then take her out along with the nest at dusk)
A crow has a dark beak, dark beak=dark heart, the Rook has a grey beak. Crows will hunt out miles of hedgerows taking eggs, fledglings, nesting game birds etc. They will perch for hours in an old dead tree watching for nesting bird coming and going from the nest. The poor old Rook is often painted the villain yet feeds mainly on Leatherjackets from pastureland, sprouting and ears of maize etc, they do damage to crops but easily dissuaded by hanging a few dead ones on sticks in the fields affected.

regards WB

Amazing, I had a quick look on the RSPB's website and apparently willowbank is mistaken.

It says they eat:

"Carrion, insects, worms, seeds, fruit and any scraps."
 

Jim xyz

Well-Known Member
Hmmm
Know what you mean.
I'll go with Willowbank's version.
:)

Me me too and I reckon anyone else that lives in the country.

It's amazing that everyone in the RSPB seems to live in a city, that or they're a bunch of lying bar stewards who'll say what ever suits their soft and fluffy version of the countryside and doesn't offend their donors.
 

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