Whats on the hook this week

#1
as so many of you seem to be heavily involved in arguments about various calibres, you must be spending all day bashing keys, Just to make sure the deer population isnt exploding lets have a quick poll .What have you shot this week?

I knocked a Roe over on Monday, one of 14 in a field ,the herds are gathering. Drop your mouse and grab your gun.
 
B

Bambi Basher

Guest
#3
Humphrey

As one of those who has been using his mouse a lot this week I thought I better post ;) , went out Monday and…………......………..blanked :eek:

Oh you could have a point, :???: still can’t stalk when it’s dark.


B-B
 
M

malcolm

Guest
#5
Took out a good friend on saturday, Stalked three fields shot a nice medal CWD. His first.
Malcolm
 
B

Bradley

Guest
#7
Shot a fallow doe on Saturday and two more this afternoon.

Could have shot a Muntjac yesterday but only had the .22-250 and I was waiting for a lamp shy fox to come along. Muntjac lived to see another day and the fox never showed. Thats life!.
 

bobt

Well-Known Member
#8
I know the feeling

I went out last year in doe season and saw only bucks, and in buck season?

yes you got it does :lol:

on a normal shoot day we see 4 to 8 every week, but can I get round them? :rolleyes:
 

remmy7

Well-Known Member
#9
friday night yearling doe from high seat.
Saturday morning mature doe(one of seven on forrest track) during blizzard and with 8 inches of snow on ground.
Both fell to the 243win using 95 grain Silver ballistic tips. No excessive damage to report.

Remmy7
 
#10
a cracking 4 point labrador sized muntjac buck, stalked last night after i came down out of the high seat.
plus i have made the keeper happy as this buck had been barking all summer setting the dogs off during the night.
toby
 

Jason

Well-Known Member
#11
Went up on to my land a couple of weekend ago and blanked it. Well choose to passed up on a shot on a fallow buck because my good old .243 would have chopped through the brush.
 

roverman

Well-Known Member
#12
:D it all started last thursday when i shot my first wildboar with a 308 150gr.then on monday night i shot a fox on the lamp with .22.250 50gr vmax. then on wednesday i shot two foxs out of the highseat with the.308 150gr. a very productive week i must say, and canot wait for the weekend to come :lol:
 
#13
roverman:

How interesting. Well done. Was your boar provided as part of a bought stalk, or were you simply in an area that enjoys these beasts' presence?

Does your FAC include boar? Mine does not, and I'm just wondering about putting in for a variation. Do I need it, indeed?

Your .308 kill suggests that tales of boar being too much for normal calibres is maybe a bit fanciful.
 

paul k

Well-Known Member
#14
The Home Office Guidelines to Firearms Officers are that they should not give a variation or approve a new rifle unless boar are proved to be on the ground and that they should not grant a variation or FAC for a rifle of less than .270 calibre and I think they also recommend a minimum bullet weight of 150grns but I might be wrong on this.

I'm sure that like red stags, boar can be successfully killed with smaller calibres but I think that the key is that, given that most boar shooting in this country is carried out in the dark, for your own safety you need to be using a round that will put a boar down with the minimum fuss and offer minimal risk to the shooter.

Without wanting to pooh pooh the achievements I notice that the photos of boar shot by forum members appear to be roughly yearlings or at the least adolescent boar, as none of them show any appreciable tusks. A fully grown male will be up to four times the size of these and present a quite different prospect. In a recent Shooting Times article Richard Prior noted that the UK has its first official CIC medal boar. This beast came from West Dorset and had tusks just a little shy of 8" in length, and there are certainly boar in the Forest of Dean and Sussex/Kent that are at least as big as this.

I think that this is a case where you cannot be overgunned but I suspect that constabularies may start to be more difficult where a large calibre is requested just for use on boar rather than extending the conditions under which an existing weapon might be used.

As my constabulary was being difficult over giving me a variation for my .270 I used the stalker's rifles which were .30-06 and .458 and felt quite happy with both but also would have been content to use my .270 had I been successful in getting a variation.

I don't think that boar are any more resistant to a well placed shot than any other quarry it's just that the consequences of a misplaced round might be somewhat more concerning and a bigger round perhaps gives you a larger margin for error in this respect. I wouldn't fancy a wounded boar looking for me in the daylight and in the dark it would be positively frightening.
 

apollo

Well-Known Member
#15
very true paul in all you say, we did not go for the biggest one for a few reasons firstly the real big one that was with these was a sow, and secondly extraction.
We have over the years shot a couple of large fallow bucks wieghting in at about 150 to 180lbs and have been able to get close to them but these pigs were down in a wet field in the bottom of the valley and it was hard enough work getting that lad out.
So yes there are bigger ones there but they wount taste as good as the younger ones about 18 months old, and yes i believe that you do need the bigger callibres to make sure as i was on edge even when i knew he was dead as we weren`t sure how the others would react.
So all in all i agree with you and they are making a point of checking the land for recent signs of boar as they really dont wont people shooting them, for various reasons................... eddie
 
#16
Tusks

Paul
After your comments I thought you might like to see a picture of a Herefordshire Boar I shot showing his Tusks, Good enough reason to use "enough gun" I think. I have posted the picture in the trophy room,
Just to give you an idea of the size of this Boar the fridge he is hanging in is 6Ft wide and the door is 3Ft and will easily hang 6 fallow with room to spare and he filled it on his own.
WD :eek:
 

paul k

Well-Known Member
#17
apollo said:
very true paul in all you say, we did not go for the biggest one for a few reasons firstly the real big one that was with these was a sow, and secondly extraction.
We have over the years shot a couple of large fallow bucks wieghting in at about 150 to 180lbs and have been able to get close to them but these pigs were down in a wet field in the bottom of the valley and it was hard enough work getting that lad out.
So yes there are bigger ones there but they wount taste as good as the younger ones about 18 months old, and yes i believe that you do need the bigger callibres to make sure as i was on edge even when i knew he was dead as we weren`t sure how the others would react.
So all in all i agree with you and they are making a point of checking the land for recent signs of boar as they really dont wont people shooting them, for various reasons................... eddie
It's a fair point. My sow weighed 200lbs and even with the 4x4 right up to her we had to have three attempts to swing her up into the back of it and we're two big lads. If you're shooting for meat you are definitely shooting the best animals - yearling males.

I'd stay clear of the sows, even small ones, as they might be carrying contraceptives injected by DEFRA although I think that only the Ross on Wye herd are being treated and I don't think that they are injecting those in your neck of the woods. I just wouldn't fancy eating an animal that had been treated this way.

Out of interest are the heads on the Dean fallow getting any better? I've got a 27" (67.5cm) head taken on the Kymin and if it had any decent palmation it would be well up in the medal class but it's very poor in this respect. I don't ever remember seeing a Dean buck that was even pushing the combination of palmation and length necessary for potential medals. I've seen some huge bucks but they rarely seem to have headgear to match. The biggest buck that I know of from the area weighed 214lbs clean but again had low scoring antlers considering the size of the animal. The antlers had good weight and fair length but disappointing palms.

Over at Wyastone, some years ago they bought in two park bucks from Sussex with good heads which they put in their enclosure and then allowed wild does to jump into the enclosure during the rut. I was told that this had improved the local heads but I've not seen a good one yet. The two bucks' effect on the local quality was short lived because poachers shot them both through the wire with a crossbow just for the hell of it - b*****ds
 

paul k

Well-Known Member
#18
Re: Tusks

WAYNE DAVIES said:
Paul
After your comments I thought you might like to see a picture of a Herefordshire Boar I shot showing his Tusks, Good enough reason to use "enough gun" I think. I have posted the picture in the trophy room,
Just to give you an idea of the size of this Boar the fridge he is hanging in is 6Ft wide and the door is 3Ft and will easily hang 6 fallow with room to spare and he filled it on his own.
WD :eek:
Wayne,

That's an absolute beast! Assuming that both your boar photos are the same animal I would guess 350 - 400lbs. You'd definitely want it to go down and stay down! If it was shot in Herefordshire it may well have been part of the herd that mine were taken from and there is at least one in the area that is a fair bit bigger than this.

Have you had the tusks measured as you may well have a CIC medal class animal here. I would guess that he is showing 6 or 7" and there will be more that we can't see. A boar with 7.6" tucks got a silver.

If you have all four tusks you can do a rough calculation as follows:

Average length in cms of both lower tusks measured round the outside of the curve i.e. left tusk plus right tusk divided by two.

The average width (half the circumference) in mms of the lower tusks measured at the base, multiply by 3.

Circumference of the left upper tusk in cms

Circumference of the right upper tusk in cms

Add these four numbers up and if they total at least 108 you may have a medal as the minimum score for a bronze is 110 and there are 2 points available for beauty (colour and shape) that are a little subjective. There are also up to a 10 point possible deductions for penalties, mostly around inequalities or lack of symmetry, also subjective. Yours might lose a point or two here as the tusks appear quite straight.

Silver medals start at 115 points and gold at 120.
 

roverman

Well-Known Member
#19
hi watermain.

i think everyone else has answerd your questions,apollo and myself are partners and we are luckey enough to have permission on the wildboar,
and yes we both have fac with wildboar on. we were told by our fao that at the moment there was only a recomendation to use .270 and above.
some of the boys in new zeland and australia say you can drop them with a.243 no probs,i think its a case of horses for corses,we try and follow the law to the best of our ability thats why we put in for the variation.
as paul k says the boar are no more resistant to a well placed shot.the one we had last week droped like a stone when we opend him up the bullet had split his hart in two,more luck than judgment some may say :D :D :D
 

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