When is a miss a miss?

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Tis1979

Well-Known Member
Amazing how hard these little deer are, but if you did miss it might be more likely under rather than over the top at 30 years the bullets gonna be about an inch or so low so if you pulled the shot low + that may have gone under, who knows, all sound advice on here though it’s nice having a dog to hand. Atb
 

downwind

Well-Known Member
Strange things happen in the world of deer stalking. Many years ago I took a H/L shot from approx. 75yds from a high seat at a Roe buck, perfect broadside stance, no chance of a deflection and I sat surprised at a complete lack of reaction from the buck (maybe he was deaf as well as lucky??) The buck only took a step forward and appeared to continue browsing! I quickly sent another shot from the .243 to the same H/L area, this time with the correct result--down he went. Later inspection showed one entry wound but two clear exit wounds 2-3 inches apart. I assume the step forward accounted for the distance between the exit wounds. Try to get someone with a dog to give the area the once (or twice) over as soon as possible. Good luck, I hope you find your munty. :thumb:
 

Hereford

Well-Known Member
Amazing how hard these little deer are, but if you did miss it might be more likely under rather than over the top at 30 years the bullets gonna be about an inch or so low so if you pulled the shot low + that may have gone under, who knows, all sound advice on here though it’s nice having a dog to hand. Atb

Agree with this - 100m zero with 100g federal would put you about and inch low @ 30 yards - aiming for HL and a slight pull might have sent you under.

Good idea to check though and if you can get a dog out all the better - I will also agree and testify to how tough they are - what with that and their size, that’s why many pin them through the shoulders.
 

Wingers243

Well-Known Member
I'd get back with a dog. Unfortunately your beast won't be much good but at least you will know.

Things like this always remind me of a surprising instance a few years back.....

A munty appeared about 70 yards away down a ride about 20 yards wide on the left hand side and crossed to the right. Having plenty of time I waited and took a shot square through the middle of the boiler room from my high seat when it was about 5 yards from the right side. Munty reacted well, shot into the thick ride-side cover on the right. I heard some thrashing about then all went still. Good. I thought.... A few seconds later 'another' apparently healthy munty legged it across the ride from the right (same side the other one ran into) and into the thick cover on the left of the ride and disappeared. I thought it was another animal that had been disturbed by the shot.

Having waited the requisite amount of time I got down, found plenty of blood, tracked 10 yards into thick bramble on the right side to find.... nothing.... but a patch of flattened cover and loads of blood. Puzzled, i went back onto the ride, strolled around and scratched my head, looked down and was standing on another blood trail where the second animal had run. Followed that into thick cover on the left side and found my munty stone dead. I tracked the second trail right back to the flattened, blood soaked patch. It was the same beast.

So having been shot at 70 yards the munty ran 10 yards, clearly fell over, thrashed about, jumped up, turned round and legged it another 30 yards back to where it came from before finally expiring.

On gralloching I Found I had hit both lungs, the top of the heart and clipped the liver as well. the offside front leg was almost shot off. Shot was slightly quartering. How it moved a yard don't know.

Rifle was an 8 x 57 with a 175 grain bullet!
 

Wingers243

Well-Known Member
And another springs to mind.... another time stalking a wood edge i found a munty round a pheasant feeder at last light one evening further along the wood edge. Satisfied that the mighty .270 would knock it off its feet and save me a follow up I fired at about 50 yards. The beast bolted into the wood and disappeared from sight. A few seconds later I heard something crash through some bushes a few yards inside the wood right next to me. I though it must be something taking fright from the shot. I Going to the shot site i found blood, started following into the wood where the trail turned sharply, straight towards I was standing when i fired. Tracking through the cover I found the muntjac quite easily, stone dead. As I scrabbled down the bank from I found the deer, not 5 yards to the wood edge, bumped right into my sticks I had left leaning on a bush to mark the place I fired from! Not often does a runner do you a favour and run straight at you!
 

Cut+Squirt

Well-Known Member
My friend missed a roe doe recently, he was dumbfounded as to what had happened. Zero pins or blood to be found on the heather. Was certain it was a miss.
Found an hour later by my GWP tucked in behind a root plate stone dead. Bullets sometimes don't expand as expected, and deer sometimes show next to no reaction to the shot. If for no other reason other than to satisfy your curiosity, may be worth getting a decent dog out for a sniff.
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
Be sure to check your zero before you next go out stalking. It is good practice to verify it after any (possible) miss. More importantly, I think that the concern you are showing over this indicates that you are a conscientious and an ethical hunter. Take heart and give yourself a bit of a break.

PS get yourself a dog. They remove a lot of the anxiety from hunting.

Best,

Carl
 

d0nni

Well-Known Member
There’s no way that at that close range a bullet could pass straight through a beast giving no physical sign of impact?

I shot a fallow doe one evening while stalking with my dad. And to the pair of us it shown no reaction whatsoever of even being hit. Came out saw us. I raised rifle and fired a shot. It shown literally no signs not even a jump from the bang of the rifle or anything. Just turned away and skipped off behind a hedge again. We both looked at eachother "no way i missed that" "looks like you did son" done the usual checks anyway and there the deer was lying there stone dead behind the hedge. We still talk of that deers reaction. Blew us away.
 

mathieson

Well-Known Member
I shot a fallow doe one evening while stalking with my dad. And to the pair of us it shown no reaction whatsoever of even being hit. Came out saw us. I raised rifle and fired a shot. It shown literally no signs not even a jump from the bang of the rifle or anything. Just turned away and skipped off behind a hedge again. We both looked at eachother "no way i missed that" "looks like you did son" done the usual checks anyway and there the deer was lying there stone dead behind the hedge. We still talk of that deers reaction. Blew us away.

Had a similar thing happen one night shot at a fallow pricket about 70 yrds no reaction what so ever with how the hell did I miss that going through my mind I fired again and it dropped on the spot on inspection there was two bullet holes less than 1/2 inch apart in the h/l area it does happen and even a “miss” is worth a follow up you never know
 

Uncle Norm

Well-Known Member
Yesterday morning out in Norfolk woodland and stopped to see if a call on the 'tuned-up' cherry-wood would produce a Muntjac.

First few peeps moved a Muntjac doe about 50 yards to my right, in amongst some fallen branches. Waited for a clear broadside shot and fired. No reaction at all !! I thought 'Surely I didn't miss that ?!!', and watched as she made off at a pace. Kept watching and after she had gone about 60 yards, I saw her rear up and disappear.

I marked the 'fall' spot in my mind and went to the strike site. No visible sign at all but my dog said 'definite hit'. Made my way along the track she has taken and started to find blood, then lots of blood then the Muntjac, lying dead behind a fallen trunk.

Turned out to be a perfect heart shot with significant exit wound too. 260 with 120 grain Sierra Pro-Hunter.
 

rem284

Well-Known Member
The dog is the best tool to tell you if it is indeed a miss, I all ways presume it is hit and check with the dog. Only then do I start cursing myself. Being able to call the shot and see a strike helps greatly. Often it is time pressure shot situations that are reasons not to be cheerful. other times its a twig or something you didnt see.
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
My question is would there have been so many informed comments.....If the subject had been a fox?


Tim.243
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
Nope not one - as people don't think they count... how many times have you heard of people shooting them at silly ranges.....

A quarry is a quarry, you must be prepared...cant see the volunteers warming up the landy, driving miles to look for a lost fox.

I've been back a number of times the next morning especially over harvest as some wheeling marks are deep and you can miss them.

Tim.243
 

hendrix's rifle

Well-Known Member
A quarry is a quarry, you must be prepared...cant see the volunteers warming up the landy, driving miles to look for a lost fox.

I've been back a number of times the next morning especially over harvest as some wheeling marks are deep and you can miss them.

Tim.243

Nail on the head, doesn't matter what animal it is. Spent hours trying to find rabbit's before now. The dog helps out a hell of a lot!
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
Nail on the head, doesn't matter what animal it is. Spent hours trying to find rabbit's before now. The dog helps out a hell of a lot!

This is a post made some time back by a member of pigeon watch who is also a Clay coach,

Posted 09 July 2013 - 07:55 PM
I went out yesterday for a day on my own, it is a long time since I have done that.
Went to an area that has seen a lot of pigeons over the past week, and in fairness has possibly been over shot.

After 5 hours and only a handful of pigeons to show for it I packed up and headed home.

The hours sitting in the hedgerow were not wasted, I spotted a very strong flight line, and the pigeons were busy all day dropping onto an area to feed and then off back to the safety of the trees.
Having packed up, I went and sat at a vantage point and watched for another 30 odd minutes, these birds were totally committed, to the feeding area, flight line and tree cover.

I returned to the area today with a new shooting friend, I arrived an hour or so before he, set up two hides, and whilst doing this the birds did not seem bothered by my movements at all.
I went and sat in my hide, and within the first hour I had 20 pigeons for 44 shots.
My friend arrived and away we went, banging away for the rest of the afternoon.
My friend was using a 20g with full and 1/2 chokes, 28g 6's, and was bringing birds down left right and centre, and also at some distance out.
It did not seem to bother the Pigeons that he stood up and waited for them, they were totally committed to landing in the trees.

By the way I forgot to mention we did not use any decoys, we were shooting over a field of Wheat bordering a field of Barley. The birds were feeding about 500 yards out in the field, and there was no where to set up near the feeding area.
We/I set up under the trees they were flighting to, over a bridleway backing onto a field that was not part of the permission.

The sad thing in todays shoot was not being able to pick up the greater part of what we shot (and only yesterday I complained about the smell of rotting pigeons at the other area), this would have done more damage to the crop than the pigeons, as most were dropping in front of us.

The total at the end of the day was a little in excess of 125, my partner was not the best counter, although a far superior shot, his hit rate was well into 1 for 2, very little got away, mine sadly slipped away, especially after I changed for what I thought would be a better position, only to be proved wrong.

I am pleased to say that this was my mates best ever bag, and also mine when not using decoys.

I will be going back to the spot in a day or two, I will let you know how I get on, keep your fingers crossed.


Tim.243
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
This is a post made some time back by a member of pigeon watch who is also a Clay coach,

Posted 09 July 2013 - 07:55 PM
I went out yesterday for a day on my own, it is a long time since I have done that.
Went to an area that has seen a lot of pigeons over the past week, and in fairness has possibly been over shot.

After 5 hours and only a handful of pigeons to show for it I packed up and headed home.

The hours sitting in the hedgerow were not wasted, I spotted a very strong flight line, and the pigeons were busy all day dropping onto an area to feed and then off back to the safety of the trees.
Having packed up, I went and sat at a vantage point and watched for another 30 odd minutes, these birds were totally committed, to the feeding area, flight line and tree cover.

I returned to the area today with a new shooting friend, I arrived an hour or so before he, set up two hides, and whilst doing this the birds did not seem bothered by my movements at all.
I went and sat in my hide, and within the first hour I had 20 pigeons for 44 shots.
My friend arrived and away we went, banging away for the rest of the afternoon.
My friend was using a 20g with full and 1/2 chokes, 28g 6's, and was bringing birds down left right and centre, and also at some distance out.
It did not seem to bother the Pigeons that he stood up and waited for them, they were totally committed to landing in the trees.

By the way I forgot to mention we did not use any decoys, we were shooting over a field of Wheat bordering a field of Barley. The birds were feeding about 500 yards out in the field, and there was no where to set up near the feeding area.
We/I set up under the trees they were flighting to, over a bridleway backing onto a field that was not part of the permission.

The sad thing in todays shoot was not being able to pick up the greater part of what we shot (and only yesterday I complained about the smell of rotting pigeons at the other area), this would have done more damage to the crop than the pigeons, as most were dropping in front of us.

The total at the end of the day was a little in excess of 125, my partner was not the best counter, although a far superior shot, his hit rate was well into 1 for 2, very little got away, mine sadly slipped away, especially after I changed for what I thought would be a better position, only to be proved wrong.

I am pleased to say that this was my mates best ever bag, and also mine when not using decoys.

I will be going back to the spot in a day or two, I will let you know how I get on, keep your fingers crossed.


Tim.243

I hope I'm not the only one who thinks this is disgraceful!
BASC is busy trying to promote shooting as a sustainable and ethical method of food production, in an attempt to justify our sport to the wider public, and then shooters leave birds to rot in the field. Sometimes I despair!
 

jb1

Well-Known Member
My question is would there have been so many informed comments.....If the subject had been a fox?


Tim.243

No idea but I spent over 1/2 an hour last night looking for a shot fox in a sugar beet field. Even the use of thermal didn't make it much easier, i did eventually pick it up, i hate it when i cant pick up shot quarry.

With regards to the original post I bet it was a good hit from what you describe, Muntjac just seem to turn into ghosts sometimes.
 

Eddie P

Well-Known Member
This is a post made some time back by a member of pigeon watch who is also a Clay coach,

Posted 09 July 2013 - 07:55 PM
I went out yesterday for a day on my own, it is a long time since I have done that.
Went to an area that has seen a lot of pigeons over the past week, and in fairness has possibly been over shot.

After 5 hours and only a handful of pigeons to show for it I packed up and headed home.

The hours sitting in the hedgerow were not wasted, I spotted a very strong flight line, and the pigeons were busy all day dropping onto an area to feed and then off back to the safety of the trees.
Having packed up, I went and sat at a vantage point and watched for another 30 odd minutes, these birds were totally committed, to the feeding area, flight line and tree cover.

I returned to the area today with a new shooting friend, I arrived an hour or so before he, set up two hides, and whilst doing this the birds did not seem bothered by my movements at all.
I went and sat in my hide, and within the first hour I had 20 pigeons for 44 shots.
My friend arrived and away we went, banging away for the rest of the afternoon.
My friend was using a 20g with full and 1/2 chokes, 28g 6's, and was bringing birds down left right and centre, and also at some distance out.
It did not seem to bother the Pigeons that he stood up and waited for them, they were totally committed to landing in the trees.

By the way I forgot to mention we did not use any decoys, we were shooting over a field of Wheat bordering a field of Barley. The birds were feeding about 500 yards out in the field, and there was no where to set up near the feeding area.
We/I set up under the trees they were flighting to, over a bridleway backing onto a field that was not part of the permission.

The sad thing in todays shoot was not being able to pick up the greater part of what we shot (and only yesterday I complained about the smell of rotting pigeons at the other area), this would have done more damage to the crop than the pigeons, as most were dropping in front of us.

The total at the end of the day was a little in excess of 125, my partner was not the best counter, although a far superior shot, his hit rate was well into 1 for 2, very little got away, mine sadly slipped away, especially after I changed for what I thought would be a better position, only to be proved wrong.

I am pleased to say that this was my mates best ever bag, and also mine when not using decoys.

I will be going back to the spot in a day or two, I will let you know how I get on, keep your fingers crossed.


Tim.243

I've got mixed feelings about this.
I generally don't shoot things I won't eat.
BUT perhaps vegans should be aware of what happens to deliver their "animal free" produce.
 
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