Where is my calculator?

John Gryphon

Well-Known Member
FORGET the calculators and jumping on the internet. Because there once was a time when kids used to add up numbers in their head, rather than using technology.
The Bullitt County History Museum in Kentucky has a pretty interesting exam showing what kids were tested on more than a century ago in the United States.
The exam gives an insight into the history of American education for a Year 8 student. According to ABC America, the test was administered by Bullitt County Schools and it was known as the “Common Exam.”
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Forget the calculator, this is how kids got by in 1912 without the help of technology.Source:Supplied

In this rural county, a good score on the exam meant a high school scholarship. A secondary education was a rarity back then, and this test was the only way many farm children were able to attend high school.
Covering mathematics, geography, history and physiology, the questions are certainly not easy.
David Strange, an executive director at the museum, told The Huffington Post the exam was actually given to the museum last year. However, the now 106-year-old test started gaining popularity again when it was picked up by The Mirror in the United Kingdom over the weekend.
So have a go, and good luck.
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Bullitt County Schools 1912 eighth grade exam. Picture: Bullitt CountySource:Supplied

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Bullitt County Schools 1912 eighth grade exam. Picture: Bullitt CountySource:Supplied

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Bullitt County Schools 1912 eighth grade exam. Picture: Bullitt CountySource:Supplied

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Bullitt County Schools 1912 eighth grade exam. Picture: Bullitt CountySource:Supplied

 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
Cords, John? Cords? What next bushels and pecks? I was, being born in 1957, probably the last generation that had to learn all that, chains, furlongs; stones, quarters, hundredweight.
 

John Gryphon

Well-Known Member
We still have many country roads named Three Chain Rd etc and 99% of the new world here dont know that a cricket pitch is a chain in length.
 

teabag_46

Well-Known Member
John, I don't even know the size of a cricket pitch in current regular units of measurement, never mind the old style ones!
 

Loki

Well-Known Member
Interesting - I presume Servia should be Serbia and Roumania as Romania.........just saying.

Calculater - whats wrong with Log Tables and then a Slide Rule (still got both mine though LT's tatty)!
 
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