Which 8x56 binoculars ?

UK Outfitters

Spix

Well-Known Member
In the mood for a little optics optimisation and looking at acquiring a pair of 8x56 binoculars.

Minox would probably be my first choice.

Burris Montana 8x56 look good but are perhaps a little heavy.

Barr & Stroud have a large range in this specification, but how to choose between the different types, is there any difference between them ?

There seem to be many look-alike / made-alike brands in the budget bracket.

What do you have in daily use ?
 

User00014

Well-Known Member
i use 10x50 leica ultravids and i like them , they are big but worth there weight in gold in low light. zeiss do a 8x56 i think i saw an ex demmo set in maclouds of tain website for just over a grand !
 

splash

Well-Known Member
Why ?????????????

8x42 yes 10x42 if you have steady hands but 8 x 56 why would you ? There are a few reasons why 42 is the most commonly used size
 

2130martin

Well-Known Member
Why ?????????????

8x42 yes 10x42 if you have steady hands but 8 x 56 why would you ? There are a few reasons why 42 is the most commonly used size

For optimum low light performance.......56/8=7

Exit Pupil
exit-1.jpg
If you hold your binoculars at arms length and look at the centre of the eyepiece lens, you can see a small circle of light. This is called the 'exit pupil' and is illustrated in the left figure.

All the light leaving the binoculars is transmitted through the exit pupil, the diameter of which is determined by the ratio of objective lens diameter and magnification.

For example:

Exit pupil = Objective lens diameter/Magnification

For a 7x26, the Exit pupil diameter = 26/7 = 3.71mm,
But for a 7x50, Exit pupil diameter = 50/7 = 7.14mm.

Hence increasing the diameter of the objective lens increases the size of the exit pupil and the amount of light entering the eye. During daylight hours when the eye pupil is only about 2-3mm dilated, you would see no difference in brightness between a 7x26 and 7x50. However, as the light levels drop, the eye pupil can dilate up to a maximum of 7mm. In these conditions the 7x50 would provide a brighter image than the 7x26. Hence binoculars with a large exit pupil are more suitable for astronomy and use in low light levels.
 
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Spix

Well-Known Member
Thanks, K., looking for information and advice from members with direct experience of particular models.

Appreciate that 8x56 may not be a universal choice. Reminds me that one member on here uses 10 - 15X50's held in one hand, lying on his back, looking downhill to see what's got up in the morning !
 
Last edited:

Spix

Well-Known Member
For optimum low light performance.......56/8=7

Exit Pupil
exit-1.jpg
If you hold your binoculars at arms length and look at the centre of the eyepiece lens, you can see a small circle of light. This is called the 'exit pupil' and is illustrated in the left figure.

All the light leaving the binoculars is transmitted through the exit pupil, the diameter of which is determined by the ratio of objective lens diameter and magnification.

For example:

Exit pupil = Objective lens diameter/Magnification

For a 7x26, the Exit pupil diameter = 26/7 = 3.71mm,
But for a 7x50, Exit pupil diameter = 50/7 = 7.14mm.

Hence increasing the diameter of the objective lens increases the size of the exit pupil and the amount of light entering the eye. During daylight hours when the eye pupil is only about 2-3mm dilated, you would see no difference in brightness between a 7x26 and 7x50. However, as the light levels drop, the eye pupil can dilate up to a maximum of 7mm. In these conditions the 7x50 would provide a brighter image than the 7x26. Hence binoculars with a large exit pupil are more suitable for astronomy and use in low light levels.

Thanks, exactly that. S
 

Klenchblaize

Well-Known Member
Thanks, K., looking for information and advice from members with direct experience of particular models.

Appreciate that 8x56 may not be a universal choice. Reminds me that one member on here uses 10 - 15X50's held in one hand, lying on his back, looking downhill to see what's got up in the morning !

You forgot the single stick!

There is a little used pair of 8X56 Zeiss milk bottles in a Tunbridge Wells (Pantiles) photogaphic shop for £1K which is far too much but they may come down ............

K
 

kuwinda

Well-Known Member
Thanks, exactly that. S

Not quite so - the human eye can only dilate to 7mm between the ages of (about) 15 and 25 or so - varies. After that astigmatism causes the pupil to take longer to dilate and unable to dilate to same degree so that when you are 70+ the pupil will only dilate to perhaps 4 or 5 mm. My father never drives at night for that reason (should he be driving ?)

Personally I use 7x42 - you can see everything you need too at last last light - and yes I do have 7x50's too. 42's are half the weight.
 

Erik Hamburger

Well-Known Member
There are many excellent mid-price range bino's - look for WP, multi-coated, gas-filled. and you'll find lots of choices around £250-£350.
Remember if you go for a large magnification you also magnify all your shaking - hence the advice from some other posters for a smaller pair.
I use a smaller and lighter pair of Burris 8x42 for stalking, and a slightly bigger and heaver pair by Steiner for high-seat outings.
Be aware that the larger bino's will not fit into one of those holsters strapped to your chest - a must for crawling and during wet weather.
Be not seduced by the marketing-men on this site who will try to promote Zeiss and Swarovski - yes excellent products, but you also pay for their not insignificant marketing budgets.
 

Spix

Well-Known Member
Cheers, Erik, I have in regular use 8x30, 8x42, 10x42 and just looking to see who has what specifically in 8x56 in general use
 
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