Which oil for stock

Jonny Boy

Active Member
I've always rubbed my wood work down with an oily rag, as in gun oil. But I noticed my shotgun started to look a bit dry and dull so thought I should use a wood specific oil instead. I had a choice between Teak, Danish and Tung oil at the time and went with Tung which has restored the colour but it is quite matt looking. I'd like a bit of shine I think. I know a lot of oils are similar ingredients just in different quantities and qualities but what do other people recommend? I've got a laminated rifle stock to consider also.

Cheers

Jonny
 

The tramp

Well-Known Member
Keep going at it with the tung, a decent oil finish is an ongoing process, a few drops a day for a few months will be a good start, there is a good long thread on oil finishing, have a peep on the search tab.
 

Whitebeard

Well-Known Member
Jonny, I think you may have a problem with your stock wood being contaminated with a mineral lubricating oil, which is not designed to evaporate out the solvents like a wood finishing oil.
I doubt you will be able to attain the kind of finish you desire untill all traces of the gun oil are removed.

Ian.
 

Jonny Boy

Active Member
Thanks Tramp. I did search but didn't find anything. Can't have used the right key words. I think you may be right Ian. I did have reservations about oiling with out stripping back the previous coats. I'm not over concerned with the shotgun but glad I'm aware when it comes to the rifle.

Cheers

Jonny
 

pietasvenatores

Well-Known Member
walnut oil is a good alternative if it's just to re-hydrate the wood and give a nice coat. once a day for a week, once a week for a month, and once a month going forwards and/or after wet outings.
 

bruce w

Well-Known Member
i give shotgun stocks a coat of gunk oil and grease remover leave overnight then wash of followed with holding over a steaming kettle to lift the grain fine steel wool with a little of the oil you are going to use little at a time , this time of the year the oil will take longer to sett ,i think the lack of sunlight slows it all down ,its a job you wont do over a weekend.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
Truwax is a good one to use, too. I have a conditioning oil that I use who's name escapes me at the moment. I'll post the name of it when I get home later
 

storm123

Member
Try Danish oil on stock ,two or three coats ,wee bit elbow grease and 000 steel wool and you get a really nice finish.
 

243 Stalker

Well-Known Member
Have any of the SD clan got some before and after photos of their stock/s and the oil used to refurbish them.

ATB 243 Stalker.
 

hillclimber

Active Member
Just when you are talking about oil and stocks I used to do the same. I notice on my .22 the stock is tight against the barrel. Would oil over time have caused this?
 

limulus

Well-Known Member
Make your own slacum mix.
not difficult with the right proportions of linseed, turpentine oil and carnauba wax. Add a dash of alkaneet oil to increase the colour of needed.
 

Coolhand

Well-Known Member
Tung Oil , first and foremost. Wood finishes fall into 2 main categories Oil & Membrane. Membrane finishes being shellac, varnish and some commercial gunstock finishes etc. Using Tung is a time consuming business but the result is well worth it. Pure Tung should be thinned using citric terpene or d-limonene which is made from orange and mandarin skins. Thinning will aid the rate of absorption but does not detract from the overall finish.I generally use a 50:50 mix but will vary it depending on the wood. The best way to apply it is with your hands. Typically I will apply a few drops and rub in lovingly whilst watching a DVD. Repeat everyday until you are satisfied with the result. A new stock will require weeks of applications of Tung Oil and membrane finishes should only be used on cheap outdoor furniture. Almost forgot to mention, when citric terpene is added to Tung it will go cloudy and does not look too attractive but leave the brew to settle for a few days and depending on the temperature it will clear up beautifully.

regards
Mike.
 
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Northwest

Well-Known Member
This is about half way through a full refurbishment, the inlet is Sterling Silver wire, and has had about six coats of Tung Oil of various strengths. Very thin to begin with so it penetrates well. It also helps if the oil is warm. Room temperature warm is good but anything above 'cold'.


 

Coolhand

Well-Known Member
Coming up a treat Northwest , one thing I like about Tung, it actually hardens even after a few days from the last application and does not turn sticky like some other vegetable based oils.

regards
Mike.
 

Whitebeard

Well-Known Member
Here are a couple of pics of my mates Tikka T3 which we finished today.




Stock is a Joe West Thumbhole Varmint in Forest camo laminate, Devcon and pillar badded.
Finnish is Tru-Oil initially thinned 50/50 with lacquer thinner and applied liberally untill stock was saturated
Subsequant coats were hand rubbed neat and allowed to dry for a day having been flatted between coats with a grey scotchbrite pad.
Final coat was flatted with "0000" grade steel wool, the resudue removed with a tack rag and a good quality paste wax applied.

Ian.
 

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