Which Quad?

Cadex

Well-Known Member
Good idea the anchor where did you find that
Bought it from a company called Spyratech, think you can buy them on the bay though. Saw them being used to hold down a massive tent whilst on holiday at Inverness and thought it would be ideal for the quad winch. I've managed to bend the top of it but it's pretty much indestructible.
 

antsa

Well-Known Member
Had a Suzuki KingQuad 400 ASi 4x4 for 5 years. Used it for cattle mustering, general farm work and shooting. It never missed a beat. Recently traded it for a Kawasaki Mule Side by Side. I'm gettin' old.

Cheers
 

Bugsy

Well-Known Member
I'm afraid I don't know the exact weight of it but it's a big heavy machine and when it does get stuck I can't look near lifting or pushing it out.

I carry a ground anchor with me all the time. It's original purpose is for anchoring down a large marquee, but is perfect for screwing down into the earth and hooking the winch up to.
Identical to this, and which incidentally is the perfect diameter to fit inside a tree protection tube making it much easier to transport :)
View attachment 182288
Mine is just a caravan ground anchor, something similar but not as robust as that one but handy . 👍
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
Would that ground anchor hold in wet/peat ground??

U get that other type that folds out with pressure, always meant to have a go welding some up.

The other old fashioned type is just a bit of angle iron with pins knocked in at the 2 different angles, needs drier ground thou, work better with haxagonal pins rather than round

Most of the normal bigger quads are getting to big to really lift out a wet hole on ur own now.
Althou a bit of scaffold plank on rack is handy to stand on without sinking as u try to lift it out.
 

dodgyknees

Well-Known Member
We use:

Honda TRX 500 FM2 and FM6 (solid rear axle vs independent rear suspension), all bar one or two with diff lock
Suzuki King Quad LT-A 750
CanAm Outlander 570
CanAm Outlander 1000

Across the farms there are about a dozen Hondas, all less than 3 yrs old, and 2x Suzuki (~3 yrs) and 2x CanAm 570 and 1x CanAm 1000 (all 2 yrs).

The CanAm quads were bought on a deal beginning 2019 along with 2x Defender HD5 and 1x HD10 XT side-by-sides. The boss wanted a flash quad to keep up with the Joneses so he got the Outlander 1000.

Every single one of the CanAm vehicles has been back to the dealer for one reason or another. The one 570 is still there and subject to a battle about not wanting it back and getting it replaced. The boss gave up with his 1000 and is back riding a Honda FM6.

Not really relevant here but all of the side-by-sides have been problematic as well. Noisy and vibrating belt drives and cooling problems, electrical problems and difficult gearshifts.

At the end of the three-year warranty, all these CanAm vehicles will be gotten rid off. They’ve been a disaster. Great specs on paper and they look the business and they sure go well when they’re working, but boy oh boy are they a pain in the arse with overall poor reliability, and increasingly here a growing poor reputation.

The Suzuki King Quads are a pleasure to ride and being automatic and more powerful, are quite a different experience to the more agricultural manual Hondas. But they are big bikes and much more of a handful in our typical conditions when the going gets tight and tough. Power isn’t always the answer. Reliability wise they’ve been pretty good except for one potentially catastrophic fault which has also been reported elsewhere around the traps, and that is a random engine cut out for no explainable reason (not that any dealer has been unable to adequately explain). It’s an electrical gremlin that could be potentially fatal when relying upon max power to maintain trajectory in very steep, wet country - if the engine suddenly switches off you are in all sorts of trouble and the only option is to bail out and watch your bike end up in the bottom of the gully. This has happened twice on one of our bikes and is always in the back of the rider’s mind. Other than that they’re nice machines!

By far and away the most popular with the staff is the Honda in either of the axle configurations. Across New Zealand the trade-in and resale value of the Honda models is streets ahead of any other brand. The maintenance costs are lower and their reliability performance tops the index, year in year out.

The Polaris is light weight garbage. You wouldn’t want to be seen dead on a Polaris.

Can’t comment on the Yamaha because I’ve never ridden one.

My answer to photos like the one posted earlier of a submerged quad is don’t get yourself into that position in the first place.

I think the most important question you need to ask yourself @1960Nick is are you going to keep this replacement vehicle beyond its warranty period, and work it hard? I am quite curious to know why the Honda is not even on your list?
 
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dodgyknees

Well-Known Member
OK so our Honda TRX500 FM2 is your Fourtrax 520. Our FM6 is your Fourtrax IRS PS.

I would avoid the electronic shift program - handle bar mounted shift paddles - these result in clunky gear changes after a while and are very unpopular.
 

Cadex

Well-Known Member
Would that ground anchor hold in wet/peat ground??

U get that other type that folds out with pressure, always meant to have a go welding some up.

The other old fashioned type is just a bit of angle iron with pins knocked in at the 2 different angles, needs drier ground thou, work better with haxagonal pins rather than round

Most of the normal bigger quads are getting to big to really lift out a wet hole on ur own now.
Althou a bit of scaffold plank on rack is handy to stand on without sinking as u try to lift it out.
No definitely won't hold in wet peat, it has it's limitations and if the ground is too wet the winch will just pull it out. I find if you screw it into the heather roots at an angle away from the direction of the bike I can generally generate enough 'hold' to at least get the bike moving. Also works well if screwed into the opposite side of a peat hag from where your stuck.

We tried a proper ATV ground anchor on a wet Windfarm where we were collecting 15K old tree tubes. Absolutely useless, it just created foot deep furrows in the peat - couldn't create enough depth to offer any hold.
 
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Cadex

Well-Known Member
We use:

Honda TRX 500 FM2 and FM6 (solid rear axle vs independent rear suspension), all bar one or two with diff lock
Suzuki King Quad LT-A 750
CanAm Outlander 570
CanAm Outlander 1000

Across the farms there are about a dozen Hondas, all less than 3 yrs old, and 2x Suzuki (~3 yrs) and 2x CanAm 570 and 1x CanAm 1000 (all 2 yrs).

The CanAm quads were bought on a deal beginning 2019 along with 2x Defender HD5 and 1x HD10 XT side-by-sides. The boss wanted a flash quad to keep up with the Joneses so he got the Outlander 1000.

Every single one of the CanAm vehicles has been back to the dealer for one reason or another. The one 570 is still there and subject to a battle about not wanting it back and getting it replaced. The boss gave up with his 1000 and is back riding a Honda FM6.

Not really relevant here but all of the side-by-sides have been problematic as well. Noisy and vibrating belt drives and cooling problems, electrical problems and difficult gearshifts.

At the end of the three-year warranty, all these CanAm vehicles will be gotten rid off. They’ve been a disaster. Great specs on paper and they look the business and they sure go well when they’re working, but boy oh boy are they a pain in the arse with overall poor reliability, and increasingly here a growing poor reputation.

The Suzuki King Quads are a pleasure to ride and being automatic and more powerful, are quite a different experience to the more agricultural manual Hondas. But they are big bikes and much more of a handful in our typical conditions when the going gets tight and tough. Power isn’t always the answer. Reliability wise they’ve been pretty good except for one potentially catastrophic fault which has also been reported elsewhere around the traps, and that is a random engine cut out for no explainable reason (not that any dealer has been unable to adequately explain). It’s an electrical gremlin that could be potentially fatal when relying upon max power to maintain trajectory in very steep, wet country - if the engine suddenly switches off you are in all sorts of trouble and the only option is to bail out and watch your bike end up in the bottom of the gully. This has happened twice on one of our bikes and is always in the back of the rider’s mind. Other than that they’re nice machines!

By far and away the most popular with the staff is the Honda in either of the axle configurations. Across New Zealand the trade-in and resale value of the Honda models is streets ahead of any other brand. The maintenance costs are lower and their reliability performance tops the index, year in year out.

The Polaris is light weight garbage. You wouldn’t want to be seen dead on a Polaris.

Can’t comment on the Yamaha because I’ve never ridden one.

My answer to photos like the one posted earlier of a submerged quad is don’t get yourself into that position in the first place.

I think the most important question you need to ask yourself @1960Nick is are you going to keep this replacement vehicle beyond its warranty period, and work it hard? I am quite curious to know why the Honda is not even on your list?

Ha, yes good advice but when your in forest and hill five days a week that's easier said than done :)
 

wytonpjs

Well-Known Member
if You want the most cost effective rugged and reliable get a Honda fourtrac 420 or 500 whatever number they’re on now , we run the 420s and they have hard lives on dairy farms and they hardly ever let us down , we’ve tried others , tried a big fancy Yamaha automatic thing and it fell to pieces in short order and went back to the hondas, if you want to spend more than necessary then go to a can am or arctic cat etc
I cannot recommend the Honda TRX420 enough! My only regret is that this one does not have PAS:confused:

DDE653FE-9F6E-494B-B641-DC1ED770A222.jpeg
 

wytonpjs

Well-Known Member
Cracking big box you have on the front of it.
Tried several flimsy plastic ones from Quad Bikes Wales etc, before coming across these on a RAU Lantra course where the instructor loaded up front and rear boxes with multiple 5 litres water-filled containers to demonstrate heavy laden handling characteristics - they are bombproof and are quick to fit or remove. I use the cooler rear box for roe/muntjac but have another one of these when I’m on fallow - one on the front, one on the back. Shoot feed sacks fit nicely in there too and shifted half a ton yesterday quickly yesterday in the mud that’s Gloucestershire now. Quad gets power washed down most trip - that’s why it’s looking so good for a 2010 machine.
 

rem284

Well-Known Member
I have had 2 Suzuki quads, several Honda's and now a Yamaha kodiak 450.

1st Suzuki was old LT model, great bike. Diff lock, low, super low and high gears

2nd Suzuki is 400 King quad, great bike not sure if the limited slip diff is better or worse than a diff lock but it goes places where I want it to go.

Honda's, all the ones I've had have had mono shock suspension. I think they are a lot less stable and more prone to getting stuck than one with twin shocks or better still full independent suspension.

Yamaha 450 kodiak, only had it a few months. First couple of weeks I thought what a piece of sh!te. It seemed to lack power, be too high geared and in reverse it wouldn't pull the skin off a sh!te. BUT know it is slowly impressing me. I can only think that itit must take a little bit of time for the belt drive mechanism to work properly and maybes the first week or I think the belt might have been slipping. The full independent suspension is great, the power steering is great. Diff lock good but does take a bit of fannying about to get it to engage. Rack carrying capacity is better than the Honda's I had. Tongue weight of the tow hitch is better. Overall height of bike is lower than the Honda so easier to get deer on to the carrier. There is also no feeling of it shifting up or down the gears, I have heard some guy's saying the Honda's are quite clunky when it changes gears.

In short, I would not have kept it going by the first couple of weeks but now I wouldn't want to part with it
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
Slightly off in a tangent, but does anyone who regularly 'bog-trots', or operates in areas of deep ditches or soup carry anything like folding loading ramp/trackways to negotiate?

Human nature being as it is we often tend to 'plough on', believing in the power of hydrocarbons to overcome the bog, and get in a bit of bother as a result, as opposed to jumping off, opening up the trackways and sliding over the soup, saving a bit of sweat and muck, albeit at the expense of a much smaller amount of time, some brain effort and a leg swing or two? I know it's a pain and a tooter to have to stop, and gets them out, but against the alternative scenario?

I get the versatility of the tracked quads, and great if 'the boss' is buying, but if you can't afford to buy these for yourself (decent ones running into the thousands, so no small outlay) then a pair of folding loading trackways don't seem bad in terms of value for money, added weight (which isn't on the bike when you actually are using them), and of course useful when the bike or other machinery has to be put up eg in a truck bed or non-ramped trailer?

 
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countrryboy

Well-Known Member
Another cutter I occasionally cut with carrys ramps and a few 4-5ft lengths of big drainage pipes in his quad trailer.
Both handy for crossing typical forestry ditches esp if u have to cross them more than once

Won't help much with larger bogs or wet areas thou,althou I think he also puts twins on it at times.

I seriously looked into the tracks but looking about 4k for a quad, almost cheaper buying an argo than tracks for ur quad
 

wytonpjs

Well-Known Member
Slightly off in a tangent, but does anyone who regularly 'bog-trots', or operates in areas of deep ditches or soup carry anything like folding loading ramp/trackways to negotiate?

Human nature being as it is we often tend to 'plough on', believing in the power of hydrocarbons to overcome the bog, and get in a bit of bother as a result, as opposed to jumping off, opening up the trackways and sliding over the soup, saving a bit of sweat and muck, albeit at the expense of a much smaller amount of time, some brain effort and a leg swing or two? I know it's a pain and a tooter to have to stop, and gets them out, but against the alternative scenario?

I get the versatility of the tracked quads, and great if 'the boss' is buying, but if you can't afford to buy these for yourself (decent ones running into the thousands, so no small outlay) then a pair of folding loading trackways don't seem bad in terms of value for money, added weight (which isn't on the bike when you actually are using them), and of course useful when the bike or other machinery has to be put up eg in a truck bed or non-ramped trailer?

Chris Brooks uses these when he's up on Arran collecting our shot animals - quite impressive but I bet they are costly :rolleyes:
r1.jpgr2.jpgr3.jpg
 

pnut123

Active Member
I would say Yamaha or Honda 👍. I know 2 boys with canams and they swear by them. I have had 3 Suzuki king quads absolutely terrible things had so many problems with them always broken down
 

Bugsy

Well-Known Member
We had a Wind Turbine company down our way and the internal ladders fitted inside them were always cut to length so there was always 2.4 m lengths on the scrap pile so my brother put them to a good home or should I say a good forest 👍
 

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