Which shotgun for minimal recoil?

twoseventy

Well-Known Member
#1
hi Guys,

My dear mother has expressed an interest in having a go at clay shooting, but due to health issues the recoil from a conventional 12b is totally out of the question. (well one shot might be as far as it goes, but i won't be popular :D).

So what are the alternatives? a reasonable weighty 20 or 28 bore semi auto?

how much load does a typical 28 bore cartridge carry, and is it likely to be enough to give a good spread- please forgive the basic questions, the 28b is a calibre i have no knowledge of.

Nathan
 
#2
All about cartridge weight. You can get some very light 12b cartridges that exhibit very little recoil - they're often used as training cartridges - a clay ground should be able to help - presumably Spitfire for you? Same would go for 20b or 28b - either can give significant recoil if the cartridge is wrong. Smaller calibres tend toward lighter guns, not less recoil........
 

twoseventy

Well-Known Member
#3
All about cartridge weight. You can get some very light 12b cartridges that exhibit very little recoil - they're often used as training cartridges - a clay ground should be able to help - presumably Spitfire for you? Same would go for 20b or 28b - either can give significant recoil if the cartridge is wrong. Smaller calibres tend toward lighter guns, not less recoil........
Thanks for that, i'll have a look :)
 

Alistair

Well-Known Member
#4
As above really. I think you can get eley firsts in 21 gram 12 bore loads and they seem to pattern well enough. Put those through a weighty over under and you won't even notice the recoil. Otherwise 28 grams through a semi auto would be an option. I think you can get recoil reduction devices fitted for a reasonable price so that and a cheap over under would be an option as well. Saves using separate cartridges for her.
 
#5
Minimal recoi

You choose the gauge but the least recoil will be felt through an automatic shotgun shooting a mild or training cartridge.Most shooting grounds will have suitable guns to try.good luck Richard
 

Haggis Hunter

Well-Known Member
#6
My kids (9 and 12yo girls) use a 410 with 9gm carts in a single barrel Yildiz - nil recoil and if I choose the stands carefully they can hit clays ok. 14gm and 19gm carts are not great in 'their' 410 - it's only 3.5lbs in weight - and much complaining results.

As said above, weight of gun and carts are important. 21gm carts in a 6lb 20br will be worse for recoil than a 8lb 12br - all other things (e.g. gun fit) being equal. Semi's seem to need heavier carts to cycle reliably - 28gm+ - but perhaps I have just been unlucky.

I have just sold a 28br and it would have been a good step up for the kids with 14gm carts. 14gm carts are hard to find, 16gm easier and 19 and above more the norm.

I have decided that 21gm carts in a chunky 12bore OU is as good as anything for the average adult to start clays on - but if mum simply wants to try a shot I'd suggest the 410 route, ideally borrowed from a mate!

hh
 
#7
i've got a single .410 hammer action which i use with what ever cheap 14gram "clay" cartridges i can find in local shops and can happily hit high pheasant with it better than i can with my 12.

i have a very dodgey back which has required multiple surgeries for multiple slipped discs i can shoot the .410 all day and so can my brothers girlfriend who also has serious neck and back issues.

I don't really find it that much more difficult to shoot clays with and i have given it to several people who can also hit high pheasant within the first 3 or 4 shots from the gun, definitely the way to go not just for kids and women.

Scooby
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
#8
A semi-auto 20-gauge or a 12 in a semi with long recoil stroke like the Benelli has half the recoil of a double gun.

I know several outstanding wingshots who practice and hunt quail, dove and rabbits on the run with a .410.

One of my favorite hunting shotguns is a Browning O/U 28 gauge.
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
#9
Basically its all phyics, newtons laws etc, a force having an equal and oppisate force. Force of shot going forward = recoil coming backwards

So the heaier the wieght of shot, lighter the gun, possibly speed of shot (faster) will all make recoil worse.
So the same 28grm load will have more recoil in a lighter 20g or 12g SxS than a 12g heavier O/U

Another thing to think about while a heavier gun will ake recoil less it may be hard for a smaller/weaker person to swing/handle as well

Any recoil operated semi should suit in the guage of ur choice, mibee worth treating her to a lesson with a pro that will probably have a nice light setup and get her hitting clays afore u buy anything. She if she likes it
 

rem284

Well-Known Member
#10
Ive got a berretta xplor light 12b. with the kickoff recoil system. When I first got it some times(apart from hearing the bang) I wondered if it had went off because the recoil is that light.
 

Hornet 6

Well-Known Member
#11
Think it's all been covered, but also note that most (but not all) 28 bores these days
are built on 20 bore actions, the + is they are not as light as they should be.
For me a 6 ½ lb 28 bore is a nice balance, usually firing 24 gram loads, 28 gram when needed.
Several years ago after spinal (neck) surgery I wanted to shoot only 16 days post surgery, I used
16 gram loads with no issues at all. These day I just stick with a 20 bore game gun and choose loads
carefully, normally anything is ok, and recently not long after yet another spinal fusion I shot 200 rounds of
16 gram loads ok, no after effects at all.

Neil. :)
 

splash

Well-Known Member
#12
The best light shooting shot gun has got to be a 28g ! My 13 year old and my wife both shoot with one, 16gm loads give very little kick and easily break clays at normal sporting setups

You can get a new Yidliz 28g for £450
 
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dan71

Well-Known Member
#13
When i was a kid i had a 20g o/u. It use to beat me up. I had it fitted to me and it was like a different gun. Its not all down to load sizes.
But i guess if its just to have a go you wouldnt get a gun fitted.
 
#14
Whilst I have owned and used numerous shotguns over the last fifty years (from .410 to 8 bore), the lightest recoil has been from a Browning Fusion three shot self loading gas operated gun in 12 bore. If I use the 24 gram load it is very sweet. It will not cycle the 21 gram loads though.
The gun itself is very light too. Like all similar self loaders, it is quite long but by no means unwieldy. Not all self loaders are light on recoil so be careful if you go that way.
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
#17
Remington has 12 ga loads with 1/2 the recoil.
You can shoot 2.5 and 2 inch shells.
You can use sub-gauge insert in a 12 gauge and fire 20 or 28 ga ammo.
 

goathunter1

Well-Known Member
#18
Interesting that, apparently, no one has mentioned gun fit. I find that most surprising as poor fit will have an effect on perceived recoil. I recommend a visit to a clay ground and time spent with an experienced coach. It will be money well spent.
 

devilishdave

Well-Known Member
#19
my lad is a small 11 year old and he uses a .410 with 19 gram carts with impressive results and has no issue with recoil. He is just about to move on to a 20 bore firing 24 gram carts, he tried it last week and as the post above states is key the gun fits well and has an absorbing butt pad.

Dave
 

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