Why do people have to do this.

Sako Hunter

Well-Known Member
Last year I acquired some new ground between Bristol and Bath, only a small patch with a handful of Roe on it. The farmer had planted a belt of new saplings and asked if i'd keep the numbers in check, monitor damage and take the odd one out as he likes to see them about. on previous stalks I'd seen one or two animals, but never the right sex or in a safe position for a shot. However the farmer was happy with this approach, as he said he likes to see them on the land. The land isn't on my doorstep so I can only get there a handful of times per year.

On my last visit, I asked if he'd seen many about, no he said, however "this chap will" pointing to a guy with a shotgun just coming back into the farmyard after shooting the odd crow. On talking to this chap in question, he said he'd brought a mate in with a deer caliber rifle, and they had shot them all to protect the farmers trees. "Nice animals they were too he said, shot four one morning as they had never really been shot at before and just stood there" he showed me a few few pics of the animals they had taken. Not wanting to cause a scene I said I'll see you about and went for a walk about the farm with the binos, needless to say I saw nothing that evening or the next morning.

Over a brew with the farmer he said his brother had asked the chap to shoot the deer, fearing they would damage the saplings, the farmer was about as impressed as I was, but being a joint owner of the farm, there isn't alot I can say about it.

We all know that most farmers want everything off their land, but why do some people have to shoot everything they see? I thought it was about managing a species, and taking a sustainable surplus, or is it just me?????
 

Oh6

Well-Known Member
Frustrating as it is, the guy may just feel that he is doing what the (other) landowner has asked in order to retain his shooting.

I have neighbouring landowners, one wanting all the deer shot and the other liking to see a few about.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
The land isn't on my doorstep so I can only get there a handful of times per year.
That's the problem. To you it's leisure and pleasure. But to the farmer...with saplings...they are a pest. The farmer let you the stalking to, as you say. "keep the numbers in check".

You haven't as by your own admission you can only get there a handful of times a year and, when you have, you've not been able to shoot any in near over a year? You've left him no option.

I apologise if my reply is a bit of "tough love" but having been a landowner and known landowners in that situation, where the you've only been seen once in a blue moon, I'd have done pretty much exactly the same.
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
On a small bit of ground your managing nothing. If they have all been shot then the hole left will soon be filled.
 

Bandit

Well-Known Member
Sorry guys but if we all do the see deer shoot deer management policy they do not fill the hole very quickly
Down here in the south west every bit of ground is (managed) so we don't have oodles of deer queuing up to repopulate the ground because some **** keeps flattening everything that sets foot on his permission
even on a small piece of ground you should be sensible about what you take and leave
 

nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
You need to manage the landowners expectations. No good following a management plan if it's not what the landowner wants otherwise they'll find someone who will. You need to decide what's more important, sticking to what you think is best or keeping your stalking. If you can do both then happy days.
 

danban

Well-Known Member
Most people I know only shoot deer for the money.
I only shoot for the freezer on my permissions. I fo understand the importance of management of deer so I will do as required if needed.

Sent from my GT-I8200N using Tapatalk
 

Archer

Well-Known Member
You need to manage the landowners expectations. No good following a management plan if it's not what the landowner wants otherwise they'll find someone who will. You need to decide what's more important, sticking to what you think is best or keeping your stalking. If you can do both then happy days.
Spot on!
 

Bandit

Well-Known Member
What I'm getting at is the person who goes in to (manage) the deer for the landowner gives all the B S about do this, do that , level this level that , then proceeds to take every Buck they see during season , which then brings in new stock which start setting up new territories fraying more stock which land owner gets upset about (understandably) . Then they don't go out and shoot any doe's because of less daylight hours weather conditions etc.
As we all know you can shoot the population as light or hard as the landowner wants but if you do it right taking and leaving the right ones you don't have to wipe them out
 

JTO

Well-Known Member
That's the problem. To you it's leisure and pleasure. But to the farmer...with saplings...they are a pest. The farmer let you the stalking to, as you say. "keep the numbers in check".

You haven't as by your own admission you can only get there a handful of times a year and, when you have, you've not been able to shoot any in near over a year? You've left him no option.

I apologise if my reply is a bit of "tough love" but having been a landowner and known landowners in that situation, where the you've only been seen once in a blue moon, I'd have done pretty much exactly the same.

+1
 

devon deer stalker

Well-Known Member
I took on a lovely piece of land a few years where no stalking had been done for years, it was pickled in Fallow and Roe, the owner said just take a few, i like seeing them around.
So i did what he requested, left some stunning bucks, took out the crap.
But he had a 'bunny basher' arrive on the scene, i would never have known what happened next until the game dealer told me he had a huge Fallow buck arrive from the farm i shot over, apparently Mr Bunny basher saw the buck limping when out bashing and took care of it, i asked the farmer about this, he said it was a one-off, next thing i am kicked off, bunny basher in, farmer said he was in receipt of lots of venison and money from the other guy, obviously the farmer had moved the goal posts, moral of the story, take it with a pinch of salt what the landowner says, beware of people 'worming their way in'
 

JTO

Well-Known Member
I took on a lovely piece of land a few years where no stalking had been done for years, it was pickled in Fallow and Roe, the owner said just take a few, i like seeing them around.
So i did what he requested, left some stunning bucks, took out the crap.
But he had a 'bunny basher' arrive on the scene, i would never have known what happened next until the game dealer told me he had a huge Fallow buck arrive from the farm i shot over, apparently Mr Bunny basher saw the buck limping when out bashing and took care of it, i asked the farmer about this, he said it was a one-off, next thing i am kicked off, bunny basher in, farmer said he was in receipt of lots of venison and money from the other guy, obviously the farmer had moved the goal posts, moral of the story, take it with a pinch of salt what the landowner says, beware of people 'worming their way in'
Had you been giving the landowner monies for venison?
 

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