Why do people tolerate bad triggers?

#1
I bought an inexpensive Parker Hale 243, trigger weight was OK but sooo much creeeeep. It didn't take much time to set the sear engagement. The previous owner must have put up with it for ages. Why? I just dont get it.
GH
 

Muir

Well-Known Member
#2
I bought an inexpensive Parker Hale 243, trigger weight was OK but sooo much creeeeep. It didn't take much time to set the sear engagement. The previous owner must have put up with it for ages. Why? I just dont get it.
GH
Not knowing any better. Maybe he shot off of a bipod and didn't need a good trigger?? If he shot standing he'd have swapped that trigger out. I can't stand a bad trigger!! ~Muir
 

NigelM

Well-Known Member
#3
I put up with an average trigger for years. Treated myself to a Jewel in the last rifle I had built. Much nicer to shoot, breaks like glass and the groups have tightened up as a result. Will never go back to a cheaper one.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
#4
I've upgraded all my triggers. The .22 now has a Yodave kit in it, and my 2 Abolts have had the Browning spring replacements. To be fair, the Browning factory triggers are ok, but they're just set too heavy. I don't even think about the triggers now. I guess it's possible a lot of people just aren't good enough shots (and no offence is meant by that, to anyone) to realise how big an effect a bad trigger can have on their shooting?
 

The tramp

Well-Known Member
#5
I put a TRG trigger onto my tikka 595, not that the tikka trigger was bad, it's just a consistency thing as I run two TRG's too, and I put a cmc trigger in the AR as the std one was far too heavy and gritty.
 
#8
Only recently been converted to the "Good" or "Quality" trigger thing, having shot since pre-teens with anything that would go bang fitted with a bent rusty nail:coat:, I just learned to go with the flow,... My moment of enlightenment arrived when breaking in my new Winnie build from Brock & Norris, this rifle had been fitted with a Timney, supposed to be one of the better makes?... well after putting on a shade more pull weight, (I once suffered an ND after a loose leather glove finger touched off a round when covering a downed deer, so I like my trigger's to go when I really want them to,:doh:) I was pleasantly surprised to the difference it made.:tiphat:
 

JeffYoung

Well-Known Member
#10
How does one know they have a bad trigger? Is creep obvious?

I used a Yodave kit to adjust my CZ 455 trigger's weight so it better matched my Weatherby (Howa 1500), but there doesn't seem to be any movement in either one before they break.

Are those just two reasonably-good factory triggers, or did I just get lucky with my particular rifles, or do I not know what to look for?

Thanks,
Jeff.
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
#11
If your rifle is suitable for dry-firing, make certain it's unloaded (egg sucking I know, but no doubt there are one or two who would jump on the ommission for the sake of pedantry) cock it and squeeze the trigger gently......if there's any creep you'll actually feel the extra travel between the sear and trigger before it releases :thumb: To be honest, if you're happy with your shooting there's no reason to worry about it, but a bad trigger is really obvious & will very quickly p iss you off
 

palo

Well-Known Member
#13
How does one know they have a bad trigger? Is creep obvious?

I used a Yodave kit to adjust my CZ 455 trigger's weight so it better matched my Weatherby (Howa 1500), but there doesn't seem to be any movement in either one before they break.

Are those just two reasonably-good factory triggers, or did I just get lucky with my particular rifles, or do I not know what to look for?

Thanks,
Jeff.
Creep is very obvious. Well it is to me anyway, I hate it. Another thing I dont like is inconsistent pull weight for example where the trigger lets off at 2lb one time and 3lb the next. Your triggers sound fine.
 

JeffYoung

Well-Known Member
#14
Thanks, guys.

I have done dry-firing drills (unloaded, suitable back-stop, etc.), and I can't feel any creep then either (and I get a nice surprise break).

Cheers,
Jeff.
 

jamross65

Well-Known Member
#15
A good rifle smith will transform a trigger for under £50, considerably less in most cases. I was told years ago by a very reputable custom rifle builder that in his opinion a good trigger was the most important thing on a rifle, assuming its an accurate weapon in the first place.

I agree though, why tolerate something unless its down to ignorance....(no disrespect intended)
 
#17
Haha
I didn't expect to spark quite so much discussion, but I wasn't even asking why people don't upgrade but simply adjust what they have to be decent. Mind you gun shops don't seem to do the basics to guns they resell and don't get me started on American factory triggers, until accutriger they were simply an insult.

I guess it's a lesson to us less experienced stalkers that just because someone has been stalking for ages doesn't necessarily mean they know that much.

Bless you all

GH
 

Whitebeard

Well-Known Member
#19
As a varmint shooter i have been shooting light triggered rifles for 20 years, for small varmints at long range its a must.
My 22BR and my 257 AI both carry Rifle Basix varmint triggers factory set at 12oz, my .17 Fireball has the factory trigger adjusted to the max but its still too heavy, i will be fitting the same Rifle basix trigger to the fireball very soon.

Ian.
 

cambsman

Well-Known Member
#20
Or you could just buy a decent rifle with a decent trigger in the first place. One has to wonder about the rest of the rifle if the designer/manufacturer can't even get something as simple as a trigger right.
 

Top