Wonder what the implications are?

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Pete E

Well-Known Member
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7575459.stm

I read the above article on the BBC news site and wondered if this is true, what, if any,the implications are for stalkers??

I haven't stalked Red on the open hill, but i would have thought wind direction and terrain would have been more influential to the feeding direction of a herd?
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
Hmm well I have stalked and managed three large estates in Scotland, still do and Red Deer behave in a similar way, but like many animals in a herd they often when grazing feed into the wind when out in the open.

Its not so easy to pick up any potential enemies when you have your face to the floor, and with the wind in your nose at least you get to smell any potential danger before it gets too close. As with most times with Red's there is always as a rule a hind or two that is not feeding, or is laying down looking around, quite often a yield hind. Stags on the other hand in early October have only one thing on their minds. Finding them is fairly easy, getting in with a harem of hinds and calves is what makes it fun :D

They also have the canny knack of positioning themselves so they have the higher ground and therefore a good view of your approach. I shall be up on the Stags in a few weeks with clients, just hope the weather is kind to me :rolleyes:
 

User00004

Distinguished Member
sikamalc said:
I shall be up on the Stags in a few weeks with clients, just hope the weather is kind to me :rolleyes:

Sikamalc, it has done nothing but rain up here for the 3 weeks I have been up here, it is shockingly wet under foot just now.

In a weeks time however I will no doubt long for some rain as I will be at Archers Post, Kenya, sweating my Ar*e off.

Hope to catch up with you when I return, Good Luck!!
 

Bandit Country

Well-Known Member
I don't want to rain on anyone's parade but I live right next door to a field with cattle in it most of the year and guess what? They tend to mooch about facing in all directions. They graze across the field, up & down the field and sometimes one lot go one way while another lot go the other.

Although the figures look impressive:
"The researchers surveyed Google Earth images of 8,510 grazing and resting cattle in 308 pasture plains across the globe."

Really? So that's 8,510 cattle out of how many on the face of the planet - 10 million? A thousand million? So probably not what your average statistician would call a representive sample. Later in the piece the report is quoted as saying the "The scientists were unable to distinguish between the head and rear of the cattle, but could tell that the animals tended to face either north or south" Oh, right, they tended did they? So therefore one can assume that not all the 8,510 were facing either north or south. I wonder how many tended to face east or west, or a little bit east of north or..........

I would be much more impressed if they found that cattle aligned themselves with true north or even grid north - thus proving that cattle can map read!

(Probably better than most Ruperts!) :lol:
 

JAYB

Administrator
Site Staff
tartinjock said:
sikamalc said:
I shall be up on the Stags in a few weeks with clients, just hope the weather is kind to me :rolleyes:

Sikamalc, it has done nothing but rain up here for the 3 weeks I have been up here, it is shockingly wet under foot just now.

In a weeks time however I will no doubt long for some rain as I will be at Archers Post, Kenya, sweating my Ar*e off.

Hope to catch up with you when I return, Good Luck!!

TJ you have been away from "proper" weather for too long. The rainwater is the warmest it has been for years. :D :D

Safe trip, shall look for you coming home.

John
 

Stayangry

Well-Known Member
I wonder whether the way large ruminants stand may have something to do with temperature regulation.

Consider, say, a milk cow: a big animal, with broad flanks, hairy skin and an onboard fermentation tank. Overheating must be a real issue in summer.

Maybe animals instinctively turn North/South when they are cold in order to catch the sun and then switch to facing East/West when hot in order to minimise exposure.

This would explain why animals in a herd may all come to stand on the same axis at any particular time of day.

Just a thought ...
 

swampy

Well-Known Member
google earth

you can see my dad sat on his patio reading on google earth, he normally sits facing the sun ruminating on scotch
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
I milked a large herd of cows for 20 years. Never noticed them standing ,grazing, laying in any particular direction. I noticed the way they crapped though. Often on me. Still you live and learn
 
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