Would some uk deer stalking be uninspiring?

devon deer stalker

Well-Known Member
Seriously considering an adventure before I’m past it but I’d need 12 months prep
Don't think about it, do it.
I'm sure people are getting bored with me going on about it, but there is nothing that I have experienced hunting wise that equates to the 4 hunts I did in Montana, DIY, up in the mountains, in snow at times, camping out (but not all the time!) packing out your animals on your back, whilst being in an area where you could easily die due to terrain and/or wild weather, or be eaten by the local wildlife!
I went there at the age of 52, and the last at 58.
The planning was just as much fun as the preparation, did I mention you have to be fit?
 

DevonRifle

Well-Known Member
We always wild camp on our syndicates , not exactly NZ style hiking ,

We could stay in hotels 5 miles away, but I'd rather be on the ground for first light mooching around till last light etc,

I've spent a full week like this a few times and long weekends aswell, pack up truck with supplies and off we pop,

We all enjoy the camp setting up etc and especially the fire pit in winter, even better if we cook bits of a beast that we grassed , it's all part of it to my lot , we'd be bored staying in hotels etc

Nowt better than the fire and stars at night in camp

Kjf
Where do you legally keep your rifle? Not baiting, generally interested as this really appeals to me.
 

norma 308

Well-Known Member
Don't think about it, do it.
I'm sure people are getting bored with me going on about it, but there is nothing that I have experienced hunting wise that equates to the 4 hunts I did in Montana, DIY, up in the mountains, in snow at times, camping out (but not all the time!) packing out your animals on your back, whilst being in an area where you could easily die due to terrain and/or wild weather, or be eaten by the local wildlife!
I went there at the age of 52, and the last at 58.
The planning was just as much fun as the preparation, did I mention you have to be fit?
55 next birthday and just lost a close family member has made be realise life is short
I could do with loosing a stone 😜
 

Bo Diddley

Well-Known Member
I know exactly how you are feeling, the shooting & fishing in far-off destinations has plenty of glamour. My desire was fly fishing for NZ Brownies, never did get there, but I have got access to a lovely bit of fly fishing in this country and my brother & I regularly fish the afternoons until dark, then campout with a cook up on a fire pit, and roll-out before 1st light to start again for a few hours, it's excellent stuff, makes happy memories!
 

John Gryphon

Well-Known Member
It’s comforting to know it’s possible to feel just as ‘connected’ and ‘moved’ by the outdoors when in a 50 acre Lowland wood with a rifle, when conditions favour one’s imagination, as it is to be assailed by the drama & mists of NZ and Pennsylvania high ground.

K
NAH,maybe with the help of the local funny shrooms.
Don't think about it, do it.
I'm sure people are getting bored with me going on about it, but there is nothing that I have experienced hunting wise that equates to the 4 hunts I did in Montana, DIY, up in the mountains, in snow at times, camping out (but not all the time!) packing out your animals on your back, whilst being in an area where you could easily die due to terrain and/or wild weather, or be eaten by the local wildlife!
I went there at the age of 52, and the last at 58.
The planning was just as much fun as the preparation, did I mention you have to be fit?
Yes and more yes.
 

bbell

Member
Hunting communities have their own culture. I think some of the fun is learning that areas hunting culture. I can attest that a remote backpacking trip is amazing and quite the experience. But at the same time there are great aspects of hunting less remote areas as well. That's why there's people passionate about animals and hunting all over the world. I wouldn't thumb my nose at a fried breakfast after a morning stalk:) I have fallen into the trap of not appreciating what I have. Even though I lived in the western states I lived in western Oregon. It's no Colorado or Montana by any means. But over time I have found that blacktail deer hunting is one of my favorite things to do. Don't get me wrong though, someday I will hunt Alaska and I have preference points in Wyoming and Colorado.:lol: Lord willing I will be able to put a hunt together while I'm in the UK. Then I can add that to my experiences as well. Each is a great hunt on it's own. Pros and cons. Enjoy them for what they are. I always enjoy looking at hunting pics so here are some pics to show the contrast. Some are farmland by the house others are in the mountains in solitude. Thanks for letting me share.

IMG_0309.JPG IMG_1116.jpg IMG_1159 2.JPG IMG_1190.JPG IMG_3204.JPG
 

norma 308

Well-Known Member
Please don’t think I’m poo pooing what us southerners do I’m off after fallow this afternoon and have looked forward to it all week !
I guess after a bereavement you evaluate life family friends work and play and what time you have to fit it all in 👍👍👍 and what’s important to you !!
All the replies are very valid and I’m pleased I posted the thread thanks a lot folks
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Where do you legally keep your rifle? Not baiting, generally interested as this really appeals to me.
If I am staying in a hotel there are various options:

1) Leave body of rifle locked in boot of car, bolt and ammo with me in the room.

2) if its a takedown Then in your duffle bag, but ammo locked in vehicle.

3) many hotels that cater for sportsman do have gunsafes ask.

4) often a guide, stalker etc has somewhere to store your rifle. Put a padlock through the action and keep the bolt before him locking it away.

Have a read of the home office guidelines on firearms Security - there is a whole section on such matters.
 

DevonRifle

Well-Known Member
If I am staying in a hotel there are various options:

1) Leave body of rifle locked in boot of car, bolt and ammo with me in the room.

2) if its a takedown Then in your duffle bag, but ammo locked in vehicle.

3) many hotels that cater for sportsman do have gunsafes ask.

4) often a guide, stalker etc has somewhere to store your rifle. Put a padlock through the action and keep the bolt before him locking it away.

Have a read of the home office guidelines on firearms Security - there is a whole section on such matters.
Thanks for the reply but I was asking about camping. How do you legally keep your rifle with you when asleep in a tent?
 
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Dan Newcombe

Well-Known Member
If you are looking for something a bit more adventure based speak to Professional Sporting Solutions - Brad can offer camp out trips out West which look pretty awesome.

He’s on Instagram as professional sporting soutions
 

John Gryphon

Well-Known Member
On this trip we ended up about 28 k`s off road and its tough but rewarding and I just wish that I was young enough to go again. I was 55 on this trip but fit.
There is no bacon and eggs and rocking chair in front of the telly that some desire but devon deer stalker has said it right,there is simply no comparison in being out in the wild away from the rest of the world hunting truly wild game.
Only 20`ks to go!

trekking into tahr country.jpg
 

dunwater

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the reply but I was asking about camping. How do you legally keep your rifle with you when asleep in a tent?
I used to shove it down the side of the sleeping bag, on the uphill side so you don’t keep rolling and sliding on to it. Since I was camping in the back end of a forest there was no one about to question the legality of my actions.
I suppose that if you are really worried you could go all Khyber pass and chain the firearm to your foot, but that way the Afridi’s will have to cut your throat before removing your foot.
 

Foxyboy43

Well-Known Member
Hunting communities have their own culture. I think some of the fun is learning that areas hunting culture. I can attest that a remote backpacking trip is amazing and quite the experience. But at the same time there are great aspects of hunting less remote areas as well. That's why there's people passionate about animals and hunting all over the world. I wouldn't thumb my nose at a fried breakfast after a morning stalk:) I have fallen into the trap of not appreciating what I have. Even though I lived in the western states I lived in western Oregon. It's no Colorado or Montana by any means. But over time I have found that blacktail deer hunting is one of my favorite things to do. Don't get me wrong though, someday I will hunt Alaska and I have preference points in Wyoming and Colorado.:lol: Lord willing I will be able to put a hunt together while I'm in the UK. Then I can add that to my experiences as well. Each is a great hunt on it's own. Pros and cons. Enjoy them for what they are. I always enjoy looking at hunting pics so here are some pics to show the contrast. Some are farmland by the house others are in the mountains in solitude. Thanks for letting me share.

View attachment 238975 View attachment 238976 View attachment 238977 View attachment 238978 View attachment 238979
Lovely shots and great to see the family immersed in it too, thank you. Also good to see the Remmy!
🦊🦊
 

Tazz

Well-Known Member
Having become addicted to Alaska NZ Yukon adventures on YouTube because our tv is such rubbish I can’t help feeling as a lowland stalker is our branch of uk deer stalking is a little limp ? Sure Scotland and some more mountain regions of England and Wales are far more strenuous but rarely do we sleep out with a days hike to get to animals let alone the pack out !
It got me thinking ?? after thinking about swap hunts would the swap guy think blimey this is a piece of cake 😜 get up a bit early hustle half hour down the road jump out take a couple of deer and be back in your house for fried breakfast!😃 I write this just a few weeks before heading to the highlands even then I’ll be in a hotel with a hot shower a two hot meals a day . Seriously considering an adventure before I’m past it but I’d need 12 months prep and of course sort this covid thing out because we’re here for a good time not a long time 👍 HNY
I recommend billy molls on YouTube a nice guy
For the same money I am sure the hotel would let you camp in the car park and bar you from the restaurant and bathroom during your stay if you want to “Wild it up more”
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the reply but I was asking about camping. How do you legally keep your rifle with you when asleep in a tent?
"Reasonable precautions" are all that's legally required. Don't overthink it.
I often sleep out under the stars with my rifle when doing a dusk and dawn stalking trip, no tent, just camp bed and sleeping bag. I take what I consider to be "reasonable precautions" for the security of my firearm under the circumstances, and don't lose any sleep over it! The main thing is that the rifle, bolt and ammo are separate from one another.
 
Hunting communities have their own culture. I think some of the fun is learning that areas hunting culture. I can attest that a remote backpacking trip is amazing and quite the experience. But at the same time there are great aspects of hunting less remote areas as well. That's why there's people passionate about animals and hunting all over the world. I wouldn't thumb my nose at a fried breakfast after a morning stalk:) I have fallen into the trap of not appreciating what I have. Even though I lived in the western states I lived in western Oregon. It's no Colorado or Montana by any means. But over time I have found that blacktail deer hunting is one of my favorite things to do. Don't get me wrong though, someday I will hunt Alaska and I have preference points in Wyoming and Colorado.:lol: Lord willing I will be able to put a hunt together while I'm in the UK. Then I can add that to my experiences as well. Each is a great hunt on it's own. Pros and cons. Enjoy them for what they are. I always enjoy looking at hunting pics so here are some pics to show the contrast. Some are farmland by the house others are in the mountains in solitude. Thanks for letting me share.

View attachment 238975 View attachment 238976 View attachment 238977 View attachment 238978 View attachment 238979
Greetings from Western Oregon! For those who are thinking of a hunt in the States, I can only advise to start building preference points years ahead of time. With the advent of Youtubers showing their hunts, the good states have boomed in popularity for folks coming to hunt there. Idaho had over 15,000 folks online the morning their tags went on sale.
 
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