xxx

243win

Well-Known Member
this is what i do, i neck turn my 300rum mainly, using the same device, normally turn brass off the neck all round just enough so it is clean/shiney this means that it should have a uniform thickness, you can reduce it more, there must be a limit as the neck will eventually be to thin, full length of the neck, you will also need a set of competition dies so you can adjust the tension of the neck by 2-3 thou more if you want a bit of trial and error as the neck will not be right for a set of standard dies.

i think it is worth it for odd calibres and accuracy for long range,
i use redding comp dies but any comp dies will be of quality anyway,

i have found it makes the rounds smoother feeding in other cals and more consistent, this is about last step in reloading accuracy

steve
 

Andy L

Well-Known Member
Sorry, going to show my ignrance but what does neck turning achieve? I am not a reloader so be kind!!!
 

charadam

Well-Known Member
300wsm - I have neck turned for .22-250, .308 and, most lately, 6.5x55.

I used the Lyman neck turner and took off enough brass so that the cases were trimmed around 60% of their circumference. this usually results in very consistent neck thickness.

With Hornady neck sizing and Lee factory crimp dies, there was an appreciable increase in precision.

Have now sold the Lyman kit and gone over to a hand-held neck turner by K&M. It is easier to use and, I believe, more sensitive. The Lyman kit used to tear the brass given the smallest excuse.

Is it worth it?

It is a hobby and keeps me off the street.

I wrote originally that "I took off enough bras" - but corrected it. Can't actually imagine taking off enough bras.

Anyway, moving on............
 

JAYB

Administrator
Site Staff
Now this is interesting, I have never bothered with neck turning. I think that I convinced myself years ago that for my style of reloading and required accuracy, that I did not need to. Never had time if truth be told.

However, charadam is probably the first person I have heard say, or should I say seen write, that there is an appreciable increase in precision using of all things Lee equipment. He then goes on to point out that irrespective of it's benefit, it is his hobby.

Isn't it refreshing in this modern age of designer this and that, someone points out it is a hobby, and improvement can be gained without falling into the trap of buying the absolute best out there.

Now, I have to start trying to get myself out of a hole, or at least a shallow depression. It is not intended as a dig at those amongst us who have the very best of equipment as I am sure that they have taken this part of their hobby to a higher level, driven by their thirst for improvement.

Lets not forget it is a hobby. I may give neck turning a try myself.

John
 

Ronin

Distinguished Member
I have a few rifles that have tight (fitted) necks (they wont take standard factory rounds)

The cheapest accuracy gain you can have when having a rfle rebarrelled is to have a tight neck chamber - it doesnt cost any more than a standard chamber.

The goal, is to have your brass sit entierly concentric within the chamber, any irregularities at the neck (uneven / non concentric neck wall thickness) will and does have e detrimental effect on accuracy.

Not that this matters much to a sporting rifle, but I for one prefer to take out all factors that will reduce accuracy, leaving only the nut behind the bolt as a factor of doubt.

How much to take off?

Entirely dependant on what the neck size is really - for example, if you have a 6.5mm with a .290" neck, you want to remove sufficient brass from the neck so that a loaded round measures .287 /8" or put another way the bullet is .264" diameter, the neck diemeter is .290" then the neck wall thickness needs to be .012" (264+12+12 = 288)

Is it worth doing?

Have to say yes, bear in mind you only ever do it once per case and its done.

Is it for everyone?

No, this is advanced handloading you need to be very careful and measure very precicely what your doing otherwise you end up with at best scrap brass or dangerously thin neck walls.

Dies?

Have to use bushing style dies for reloading and select a bushing .002" smaller than the loaded round diameter.

You can also neck turn cases for standard chambers, by doing a 3/4 turn clean up (clean the brass so that material is removed from 3/4 of the diameter of the case) this does also have a positive effect of accuracy.

Oh, I load for 22-250, 6.5x47, 6.5x284, 7mm/300WSM, 7mm/270WSM, 308, and 338LM - five of these are fitted necks.

I wouldnt do it if there was no benefit - it's not a fun task!


Hope this helps.
 

charadam

Well-Known Member
Redmist - what you said x2!!

Jayb - my Lee dies, as it happens are extremely accurate and happen to give the neck tension needed to take advantage of neck turning.

Otherwise I would have had to buy the more expensive bushing type dies.

I'm a Jock - so no way that was going to happen!
 

Mat

Well-Known Member
I use a Sinclair neck turner...

It's actually quite quick, what I do is to mount the case in a Lee zip trim / universal chuck: first trim it with the Lee trimer, slight inside neck chamfer, then turn the neck turn, then outside neck chamfer. Trimming first means that you get a consistent length of cut.

If you shoot 260 or 243 and you're tight fisted, then you can usually get 308 once fired brass fairly cheaply, neck turn it and size it down. If you try necking down without neck turning then you end up with a thick neck. However the case length is a bit on the short side for 243 or 260.

My next barrel is going to be a wildcat 6mm made by necking down a 308, I made up a couple of dummy rounds, sent them off and had a chamber reamer ground to match...
 

charadam

Well-Known Member
Mat,

I tried the powered approach to neck turning (not a ZipTrim, but a powered screwdriver) and kept tearing up the brass.

Tried a number of cutting lubricants with no success.

What's your secret?

Charles
 

JAYB

Administrator
Site Staff
charadam, don't get me wrong I am not knocking Lee dies, I use them for all my reloading. Lets not forget that world championship was held, using Lee dies for a number of years. Having had a senior moment I can't remember who, so now I have to look it up, like I didn't have enough to do.:cry:


John
 

Mat

Well-Known Member
charadam said:
Mat,

I tried the powered approach to neck turning (not a ZipTrim, but a powered screwdriver) and kept tearing up the brass.

Tried a number of cutting lubricants with no success.

What's your secret?

Charles
Which bit is tearing? I lubricate the mandrel with Imperial sizing lube... A bit on the cutter doesn't hurt either. I find that a close fit of the neck on the mandrel helps, otherwise you get chatter. I always neck turn after sizing...
 

Mat

Well-Known Member
JAYB said:
charadam, don't get me wrong I am not knocking Lee dies, I use them for all my reloading. Lets not forget that world championship was held, using Lee dies for a number of years. Having had a senior moment I can't remember who, so now I have to look it up, like I didn't have enough to do.:cry:


John
I've never had a Lee die that failed to screw into my press, but I've had 2 Redding dies that did. Then there's the Redding Competition seater that hasn't been reamed out properly: there's a constriction in the sleeve that means that the bullets get stuck. Good job that there's a lifetime guarantee on them as one day I might get round to returning it for repair...

In 308 I have a Redding FL sizing / bushing die, a Forster sizing die and a Lee - the Lee was a freebie that came with a press and it's the one that I use most as it's slightly tighter around the base. Also, the expander ball is high up (like on the Forster) and is tapered for necking up. So in effect, it's die with features that you'd pay extra for... And I got it free!
 

Ronin

Distinguished Member
Best way I find to turn necks under power is to use a rechargable electric screwdriver (the kind with the removable bits)

The K&M shell holder and indeed Sinclair Universal shell holder fits this.

The electric screwdriver rotates at a slow speed so there is no significant heat build up of the cutting tool, I place a drop of light oil to lubricate the cutting tool each pass.

Tearing is down to taking too much in one pass or blunt tooling.


Without getting off the thread the Redding comp Seater posts, quite often need lapping to fit the bullet to stop them marking - this is prevalent in 6.5mm, 7,mm and 30 cal due to the wide variatey of Ogive shapes available for these bullets - simply one seater post does not and cannot fit all bullet shapes.

They are available from Redding and are very cheap.
 

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