Yellow, Black or Chocolate?

Musketeer

Well-Known Member
My boy is a chocolate lab, chunky, thick set and called Oliver. Well really he responds to to Ollie. Got to say he is the best dog I have had. Unfortunately my boy is seven and ten is the average age for a chocolate to pass to dog heaven (Not sure that exists in truth...).
The wife and I have discussed this tonight and we have decided to introduce a pup.

As a profession, we are Foster Carers and have young children in the house. These children change periodically. Ollie loves children,...dislikes men and is protective of the children and my very young and beautiful wife (she is 28,...I'm 48).

So my question is,...go for chocolate,..or try another colour? Are their traits so different? What are your thoughts on labs?
 

riddick

Well-Known Member
My boy is a chocolate lab, chunky, thick set and called Oliver. Well really he responds to to Ollie. Got to say he is the best dog I have had. Unfortunately my boy is seven and ten is the average age for a chocolate to pass to dog heaven (Not sure that exists in truth...).
The wife and I have discussed this tonight and we have decided to introduce a pup.

As a profession, we are Foster Carers and have young children in the house. These children change periodically. Ollie loves children,...dislikes men and is protective of the children and my very young and beautiful wife (she is 28,...I'm 48).

So my question is,.am I a lucky bugger?
oh come on,,, you have no intention of getting another dog, just wanted to tell us all about your beautiful young wife, ;) :rofl:

ps, pics, or it didn't happen. :-|
 

Pedro

Well-Known Member
Well why not tell about the wife? Good for you, and even better for you to be fostering. As for Labradors, I don't think there's too much difference between yellow, black and red. Let's face it, there can be different colours in the same litter. Chocolate ones do tend to be more thick set and they say they are harder to train, although not sure I really believe that.

My advice would be if you really don't mind what colour, look for the other attributes you want. A working strain is usually smaller and faster, needs more exercise and stimulation, the more pet/show end of the spectrum you get bigger dogs and you sometimes have to watch their weight. Hip dysplasia is a thing to rule out too. But pretty much all Labradors would be ideal for your environment. They all have that loving, loyal nature. Having a youngster about the place may well enliven the one you have too, give him an Indian summer. Did for mine. Anyway, 13 years old is quite achievable for many Labs, so you might have the old boy about for a bit yet. The one I have is 9 going on 10 and still jumps up into the Discovery boot with ease, does some work on pheasant days and no runner escapes, but is putty in the hands of any of my 6 grandchildren.
 

Cootmeurer

Well-Known Member
As a lab aficionado and breeder/trainer I can say that, with the exception of those mutant mutt silvers, lab color is of no major difference. I prefer blacks, but have had yellows and chocolates. From good bloodlines you will likely get good dogs.

The minor differences that I do see are that coat type and color can make a difference if you hunt in very hot or very cold areas. Here in the Southern US a yellow lab with the less dense coat tends to be less heat stressed during our Sept-Oct hunting seasons, when it regulatory is 30C or higher. Likewise, a buddy from up north likes dark dogs with the dense undercoat, but he primarily hunts waterfowl and upland in the dead of winter when temp are -10C.
 

philip

Well-Known Member
Keep the dog fit in mind and body he’ll last more than a few years, my last chocolate lab was 18 when he slid off a couple years ago he worked 15 of them years

Good all round dog
 

Red Dragon 2

Well-Known Member
We have 5 chocolate labs, bitches from show strain and the dogs are working strain as they are taller and less prone to getting fat, the latest addition we have bred is 7 months old and already nearly as tall as his sire. Time to get some serious training in with him. Personally I would go for temperament rather than colour especially as you are fostering.
 

rover

Well-Known Member
KC Black, Yellow, Chocolate. Are the colours recognised by the KC.
They say chocolate can be hard mouthed, don't know if this is true. But you don't see many in the shooting field.
Do your homework check all health and breeding of potential future pup. Take your time and choose wisely.
Jim
 

Acm

Well-Known Member
We recently got married and spent some of the kindly gifted wedding money on a lab pup, I work collies for work and have never had a sporting dog. I’m chuffed to bits with him. A dark yellow/fox red called Ben. If the other colours are the same as him you can’t go wrong, he’s loving, loyal, attentive and bright and is already easily doing 100m tracks at 5 months old. Good luck with the pup and we’ll done on the fostering!
 

Mossypaw

Well-Known Member
Don’t treat a pup as a commodity, it’s part of a family. It doesn’t matter what colour it is, it takes its lead from you.
Pick the runt of the litter if you can, and let it learn from the environment you place it in, dogs don’t come pre programmed, they are what you make them.
 

dartmoordog

Well-Known Member
A few years ago I was offered a Sprocker pup for next to nothing, he was the one no one wanted, not even me if I am honest, but I got him at “cost” price so I took him at about 14 weeks. A real gamble.

He was an awesome working dog, a little headstrong at times (Cocker) but honest, biddable, loving and as tough as old boots. He would wreck himself to flush the last Pheasant on Dartmoor, as a retriever he was rubbish until his last season, but has a hunting dog, not much could touch him.

I lost him this year, and I guess you could have called him the “runt”, he was ugly with bow legs, but turned out one hell of a dog.
 

Musketeer

Well-Known Member
Don’t treat a pup as a commodity, it’s part of a family. It doesn’t matter what colour it is, it takes its lead from you.
Pick the runt of the litter if you can, and let it learn from the environment you place it in, dogs don’t come pre programmed, they are what you make them.
Well just to put things straight, Ollie is very much part of the family. I wanted a black when we were looking(because I had, had two blacks in the past), a chocolate litter came up, where the pups were clearly living with a family of young children. This is vital, as this member of the family is vetted by Social Services in the same way the humans are. Ollie is a working dog, providing therapeutic benefits to the vulnerable children we care for.

The little bundle of 'bear cub' left his litter mates and was curious enough to approach my children and climbed on to their laps. He felI asleep on them snuggled up. We feel he chose us. I understand that they are not pre-programmed, but they do do have differing traits.

I thank you for you comments.

 
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foxdropper

Well-Known Member
I’ve been in dogs just as long and maybe we are looking for different attributes but runts are just that ,runts .Ive worked terriers and lurchers for 35 years and bred my own line of terriers for 30 odd and I’ve never seen the runt go on to make a decent worker so these days it’s a gift to a pet home .
I’m not saying they won’t work just that they get pushed about a bit when trying to work .
Pick of litter is a saying usually associated with the boldest ,best looking pup in the litter not the runt left behind .
Then again the terrier game isn’t money orientated like the gundog world where every pup has a price tag on it .
 

riddick

Well-Known Member
Well just to put things straight, Ollie is very much part of the family. I wanted a black when we were looking(because I had, had two blacks in the past), a chocolate litter came up, where the pups were clearly living with a family of young children. This is vital, as this member of the family is vetted by Social Services in the same way the humans are. Ollie is a working dog, providing therapeutic benefits to the vulnerable children we care for.

The little bundle of 'bear cub' left his litter mates and was curious enough to approach my children and climbed on to their laps. He felI asleep on them snuggled up. We feel he chose us. I understand that they are not pre-programmed, but they do do have differing traits.

I thank you for you comments.

"she's never 28!!!" ;)
 

foxdropper

Well-Known Member
To be honest mate (musketeer)even though the dog looks fine with the child I wouldn’t be complacent about that scenario .The dog is putting up with the attention at that moment ,not thriving on it as in petting when the dog isn’t chewing, eating .
I know it’s negative and you probably don’t see anything amiss but I’ve seen the flip side to it and wouldn’t wish it on anyone .
Good luck in your choice of puppy .
 

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