Questions questions questions

Beretta shooter

Well-Known Member
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]I’m hopping some of the reloading experts can possibly shed some light on a few questions I have? [/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]I’m yet to start reloading for my sako 85 .243 but have done loads of reading up and have a friend that’s reloaded in the past willing to keep me rite and point me in the correct direction and keep me safe to start with. However if I’m honest on a few subjects the more I read the more I’m confused. In particular when it comes to powder choice and load data, I have bushwear local to me and they stock Vihtavuori and it would seem to be a popular choice on here so was thinking I would start with that but what one???? [/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]N150/N160/N165/N550/N560 as they are all listed for a 100grain head? Also when I try to cross refer between different manuals to help with my choice I find different min and max loads for the same powders when using different head brands but are still 100grain. [/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Am I making this to complicated for my self and just confusing things? [/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]I was planning to start with Sierra pro hunter 100grain heads but they don’t supply much data for Vihtavuori. [/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Can I use other 100grain head data from the likes of Nosler or Hornady? [/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Next up is primer choice, CCI seam to be the popular choice but they do the standard large primer and also the bench rest ones at almost twice the price. Do they make any difference or is it a case of use the standard ones to work up your load and then swap to bench rest to see if it makes a difference or would I need to rework the load? [/FONT][/FONT]
[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot][/FONT]
[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot][FONT=&quot]Sorry for all the questions some of which might be silly but we all need to start somewhere.[/FONT][/FONT]
 

Woodsmoke

Well-Known Member
When I started to reload for my rifles I made a decision as to which bullet I was going to stick to, which primers were easiest to get, and from which manufacturer. I chose Speer 130gr bullets as they seemed to be really popular, CCI LR primers, and also H4831 as that was deemed to be the 'powder of choice' for the .270. I then stuck to the Lee manual for my load data, and tried a range of powder weights for my chosen bullet. Interestingly, my final load was suggested to me by a chap on here, and it turned out to be my choice of powder, but at a considerably lower weight than the Lee manual suggested as a starting load. It's now my go-to load and I have no intention of changing it! I had every intention of reloading my 22-250 too, but in the end decided to stick with factory ammunition.

My point is, it's really easy to chase yourself into ever-decreasing circles as there's so much data available. I found it best to keep it simple, reduce the variables as much as possible, and just work-up a load (using my chosen components and powder) that shot well enough to keep me satisfied. Of course, there's absolutely nothing to prevent you experimenting to your hearts content, (as long as you work up from the recommended 10% below minimum for each new load), but I found I very quickly ran out of both time, and the inclination, to spend too much time at the reloading bench.
 

robus10T

Well-Known Member
Hope this helps
4390155e256d4f8482cdd664a23e8f92.jpg
 

takbok

Well-Known Member
N160 is a great choice and you won't go wrong with a 100gr Sierra Pro Hunter. Gameking could also work well.

Use the Vihtavouri 100gr data.
 

Andy-shooter

Well-Known Member
Picking a bullet and sticking to it is pretty decent advice.

I like nostler partition 95gn bullets. They are tough so can be run fast to get a nice flat trajectory and some measure of security regarding the 1700fpe limit on larger species, they penetrate extremely well and yet on a muntjac the cause quite acceptable damage ( because they stay together very well ). The previously mentioned 100gn pro hunters are very good too and half the price of the partitions

In my 24” barrel I get nudging 3000fps with either bullet using reloader 22 powder and unbelievable accuracy (1/2” 5 shot groups @ 100 yds over and over again)
 

sh1kar

Well-Known Member
I also use Rel 22 and echo accuracy Unfortunately have now ran out - not sure if its on the non com[liant list? will watch this with interest I have good supplies of Vit 140, 50, 60 and Hodgdon H4350
S
 

Beretta shooter

Well-Known Member
Thanks for all the input guys, I’m needing to go for a 100grain bullet head as my .243 is my only centre fire rifle and I have permission with sika on it and another with the occasional red.

So just to clear things up I can use the Vihtavuori load data on any 100grain head be it flat or boat tail? But if I was to change head I would need to go back to the min and work it up again?
If that’s the case why do different manufacturers give different data compared to the powder manufacturer?
 

Laurie

Well-Known Member
I also use Rel 22 and echo accuracy Unfortunately have now ran out - not sure if its on the non com[liant list? will watch this with interest I have good supplies of Vit 140, 50, 60 and Hodgdon H4350
S

All Alliant 'Reloder' series powders that we get here are Reach-compliant as they're manufactured in Europe by Bofors in Sweden or Nitrochemie in Switzerland. So, Re22 remains with us.
 

Miki

Well-Known Member
I know Bushwear call then 'heads' but the proper term is 'bullets'

The difference between the Viht N150/160/165/ powders is the burn rate. The slower burning powders are more suited to larger calibers and heavier bullets where a faster burning powder suits smaller caliber lighter bullets.
You can this this 'pattern' on the Vhit reload data pages. If you look at the .243 page (for example) the data starts with a 58gn bullet and works up to a 105gn.
The 85gn can use a fast burning powder (N135) which dissapears off the list for an 80gn bullet.

N150 and N160 appears pretty consistantly across the whole range so if you were to pick this powder you could use a variety of bullets (of different weights).
N160 burns slower than N150 and in between these two are the N540 and 550 powders.

vihtavuori.com/reloading-data

CCi LR-200 primers are fine, they will do everything you need.
N150 powder will too.
 
Last edited:

Edinburgh Rifles

Well-Known Member
what barrel length?
N550 is a good powder
double base./high energy
good trade off in terms of pressure curve, fill, %age burn, efficiency

42.5gr N550 under Sierra 100gr PH for 3025fps at 58kpsi



243 550 100grPH.png
 

25 Sharps

Well-Known Member
As has already been said N160 probably a good choice.

To answer your question on swapping primers. As a general rule if you switch any component, bullet / brass (head stamp say, fed for lap) / primer you should work back up as all will affect pressure. This is really important if your load is nearer the higher end but good practice at any charge weight and for the sake of loading and testing a couple of rounds to check for pressure. Some folk will say you need to do the same for a new batch of powder, again, more important at higher end loads or if there is a bit of time between batches of powder.
 

25 Sharps

Well-Known Member
Thanks for all the input guys, I’m needing to go for a 100grain bullet head as my .243 is my only centre fire rifle and I have permission with sika on it and another with the occasional red.

So just to clear things up I can use the Vihtavuori load data on any 100grain head be it flat or boat tail? But if I was to change head I would need to go back to the min and work it up again?
If that’s the case why do different manufacturers give different data compared to the powder manufacturer?

When substituting bullets look for a similar profile, lots of variables like cartridge overall length can change the pressure. Different profiles, say boat tail plastic tip vs. flat base soft point, will use up more or less case capacity and therefore changing pressure, if loaded to the same length. If you look at Nosler's data it is generally just banded by weight, so different bullets, same charge weights but if you look different lengths to compensate.

All these variables, primer, powder, brass, bullet profile, length and even barrel twist all affect pressure and that is why you get variance between source for various loads, if that makes sense!
 

25 Sharps

Well-Known Member
I know Bushwear call then 'heads' but the proper term is 'bullets'

The difference between the Viht N150/160/165/ powders is the burn rate. The slower burning powders are more suited to larger calibers and heavier bullets where a faster burning powder suits smaller caliber lighter bullets.
You can this this 'pattern' on the Vhit reload data pages. If you look at the .243 page (for example) the data starts with a 58gn bullet and works up to a 105gn.
The 85gn (you mean 58)can use a fast burning powder (N135) which dissapears off the list for an 80gn bullet.

N150 and N160 appears pretty consistantly across the whole range so if you were to pick this powder you could use a variety of bullets (of different weights).
N160 burns slower than N150 and in between these two are the N540 and 550 powders.

vihtavuori.com/reloading-data

CCi LR-200 primers are fine, they will do everything you need.
N150 powder will too.

Fixed it for you
 

Beretta shooter

Well-Known Member
Thanks so much to everyone that’s replied in perticular the guys that have took the time to explain in details about powders and the difference in supplied data. Things certainly make a bit more sense now. Looking like a trip to
bushwear for a tub of N160 and some CCI primers will be on the cards soon.
 

Beretta shooter

Well-Known Member
Thanks for that Ed much appreciated.
I presume that would be the max load?
Could I be a pain and ask you if you could do the same for N160 if you don’t mind?
Barrel length is 20”
 
Top