Sad but predictable

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
"7 month wire haired dachshund, brilliant with kids and other dogs, very sad sale due to longer working hours and not enough time to look after her "

And guess what the price is?............................£3000

If you are foolish enough to have bought a puppy through the Halcyon days of furlough and now find that you made a cock-up, at least seek out the very best home, totally regardless of the price-tag.

Makes my blood boil!
 

Hornet 6

Well-Known Member
These people just treat them like commodity, if I ever needed to rehome any of my dogs god forbid the money wouldn’t come into it I would just want the best home for them.
Dogs are a commodity with what people pay these days, breeders being the worst examples.
As for importing unwanted dogs from abroad, and breeders doing the same, while there are homeless dogs for adoption is just madness.

Neil.
 

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
Dogs are a commodity with what people pay these days, breeders being the worst examples.
As for importing unwanted dogs from abroad, and breeders doing the same, while there are homeless dogs for adoption is just madness.

Neil.

We are breeders (all be it hobby breeders) are our dogs a commodity? I guess, in a way they are. I certainly look at them as genetic 'raw material' when planning for future matings, there is no other way really as genotype is far more important the phenotype and I will certainly continue to import the best (IMHO) genetic raw material than I can, regardless of Country or cost.

Do they live with us as part of the family? Yes they do. Do we enjoy their nature and personality as pets and companions? Yes we do. Do we admire their working ability? Yes we do. Do they receive the lifestyle of any other well-cared-for pet? Yes, of course they do.
 

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
Probably what they paid for it, and tbh although I don't condone overly priced pups if they sold it at 1k someone would buy it to spin it on for a profit unfortunately..
Sad times we live in...
Cheers Jimmy
I agree Jimmy but I'd rather see more emphasis on the type of home that they are looking for and perhaps even a contract with a probationary period for the new owner. The cynic in me says if anyone turned up with £3000 in notes the pup would be sold in a flash.
 

London Jaeger

Well-Known Member
£3k!? are they trying to make a profit off their cockup? Ruthless....

Makes you feel like it might not be a particularly good home either way and that dog may of dodged a bullet if the right people are prepared to pay for it.
 

baguio

Well-Known Member
£3k!? are they trying to make a profit off their cockup? Ruthless....

Makes you feel like it might not be a particularly good home either way and that dog may of dodged a bullet if the right people are prepared to pay for it.
How are they making a profit? Its been fed, vacinated and looked after for 5 months and probably cost £2500 ish to start with. You might to approve but they not getting rich at that rate.
 

willowbank

Well-Known Member
Dogs are a commodity with what people pay these days, breeders being the worst examples.
As for importing unwanted dogs from abroad, and breeders doing the same, while there are homeless dogs for adoption is just madness.

Neil.

Locally we have a village forum and a post mentioned dogs regularly being “rescued” (how I really dislike that word being used in this context) and flown over from China to be rehomed.
My question is who the heck is footing the bill for that?

WB
 

baguio

Well-Known Member
Plenty of pro trainers sell on dogs that don't have the X factor to win trials etc. I think that too many people confuse human emotions with those of a dog. This dog and plenty more more will move to a new home without a care in the world. People's circumstances change, sh1t happens. I'm sure that the dog will find a good home and be quite happy. Making things cheap doesn't guarantee that the home it goes to will be a good one. Quite the opposite.
 

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
Locally we have a village forum and a post mentioned dogs regularly being “rescued” (how I really dislike that word being used in this context) and flown over from China to be rehomed.
My question is who the heck is footing the bill for that?

WB

I've heard a rumour that dogs in Romania are now being bred to produce 'rescue dogs'????????
 

London Jaeger

Well-Known Member
How are they making a profit? Its been fed, vacinated and looked after for 5 months and probably cost £2500 ish to start with. You might to approve but they not getting rich at that rate.
*Gross Profit - my sincere apologies for my flippant use of accounting terms
 

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
Plenty of pro trainers sell on dogs that don't have the X factor to win trials etc. I think that too many people confuse human emotions with those of a dog. This dog and plenty more more will move to a new home without a care in the world. People's circumstances change, sh1t happens. I'm sure that the dog will find a good home and be quite happy. Making things cheap doesn't guarantee that the home it goes to will be a good one. Quite the opposite.
On this occasion the 'reason' is there for all to see 'Now working longer hours and don't have the time'......That isn't in the same category as a trial or show dog that doesn't make the grade. I have no qualms with trial/show breeders who run pups on and then find good homes for the ones that don't quite have it......I know one show breeder who is such a perfectionist she has passed on dogs that actually turned out as show-stoppers at 2 years old. She has kicked herself many times.
 

baguio

Well-Known Member
On this occasion the 'reason' is there for all to see 'Now working longer hours and don't have the time'......That isn't in the same category as a trial or show dog that doesn't make the grade. I have no qualms with trial/show breeders who run pups on and then find good homes for the ones that don't quite have it......I know one show breeder who is such a perfectionist she has passed on dogs that actually turned out as show-stoppers at 2 years old. She has kicked herself many times.
Sorry Keith but what's the difference? One is doing it for money and one because their working hours have changed? The end result is exactly the same.
 

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
Sorry Keith but what's the difference? One is doing it for money and one because their working hours have changed? The end result is exactly the same.
What is different is that the trialler or fancier 'plans' to run-on more than one. The trialler or fancier often has a list of homes ready to recieve dogs from them as they know anything worth running on is better than average.

I ask you...where is the planning in this situation?
 

Dan Newcombe

Well-Known Member
The person doing it for money (the trainer) is selling a value added dog.

The seller of the sausage dog bought a dog because they had time due to a temporary government subsidised work situation (cynical but likely) and now can’t be bothered with it when it needs walked, trained and generally looked after. It was always only temporary so what was their plan when they went back to work? It’s also likely that you get a 9 month old dog that is a pain in the arse because no one has spent any time training it.

I’ve no issue selling dogs and getting whatever money you want from them and regularly sell puppies and trained dogs so it’s not some idealistic ‘they should be free to a good home’ dream - it’s a dislike of people who are taking the **** and are, when the bottom line comes - idiots.
 
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