Sea Eagles.

riddick

Well-Known Member
With so much talk of birds of prey in general, I wonder how these [and the people affected by them] already there appears to be conflicting ideas of their habits.



 
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riddick

Well-Known Member
well there should have been, but my keyboard seems to be misbehaving, [or possibly my mouse], every so often it misses letters out making the sentence incomplete, it should have read,,
With so much talk of birds of prey in general, I wonder how these recently released sea eagles [and the people affected by them] will fare?, already there appears to be conflicting ideas of their habits.

there, I hope that's explained it for those or you can just off
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
Magnificent birds but no friend of the sheep farmer take significant numbers of lambs though the raptorphiles deny it
One had a go at a keepers field spaniel when we were rough shooting thought better of it when it saw all the people
that were there.
 

Mickeydredd

Well-Known Member
The riskiest time for interaction with livestock, especially fowl, is when they begin to wander - which is what happened in the final attachment re the cleric.
 

riddick

Well-Known Member
oops looks like it done it again, that should have been,,
there, I hope that's explained it for those who couldn't understand it, or you can just imagine how off putting it must be. :tiphat:
 

kes

Well-Known Member
Simply no understanding and then they complain when people feel the need to protect their valuable animals - still maybe marginally better photo than a golden eagle eating a rabbit in a Fenn trap. I am sure CWIS will say its natural predation - maybe when he takes his dog for a walk near his partners Zoo he will change his mind ???
 

caorach

Well-Known Member
The problem with sea eagle introductions has been the huge number of these apex predators that have been released into areas much too small to sustain them. They may have been native in parts of the UK in the past but were probably extremely rare. Anyone who has watched an eagle will know that it has a huge territory. In the Hebrides they've released many tens, perhaps 100, sea eagles into an area that might have the physical land mass to sustain a few of them. As a result the sea eagles don't do so very well in terms of the entire environment as they compete with each other, plus they have a significant impact upon the other raptors in the area. Golden eagles in particular seem to have been impacted and I'm seeing a lot less harriers as well, I suspect it is for this reason that the RSPB deny there were harriers on Lewis for example as it seems to me that it is the sea eagles that have wiped them out.

For "conservation" organisations this is, of course, a "win win" situation as they can get money from people for releasing sea eagles and they can get money from people to save the raptors that the sea eagles are killing. If you can blame the "missing" raptors on, say, gamekeepers, then that is an added bonus as you can also get money for getting gamekeepers banned.

The other significance of the sea eagle is as a symbol of the power of the conservation organisations - every time you see a sea eagle soaring over an empty moorland it quite clearly says, on behalf of the conservationists, "we're in control around here and you'll do what we tell you."
 

riddick

Well-Known Member
The problem with sea eagle introductions has been the huge number of these apex predators that have been released into areas much too small to sustain them. They may have been native in parts of the UK in the past but were probably extremely rare. Anyone who has watched an eagle will know that it has a huge territory. In the Hebrides they've released many tens, perhaps 100, sea eagles into an area that might have the physical land mass to sustain a few of them. As a result the sea eagles don't do so very well in terms of the entire environment as they compete with each other, plus they have a significant impact upon the other raptors in the area. Golden eagles in particular seem to have been impacted and I'm seeing a lot less harriers as well, I suspect it is for this reason that the RSPB deny there were harriers on Lewis for example as it seems to me that it is the sea eagles that have wiped them out.

For "conservation" organisations this is, of course, a "win win" situation as they can get money from people for releasing sea eagles and they can get money from people to save the raptors that the sea eagles are killing. If you can blame the "missing" raptors on, say, gamekeepers, then that is an added bonus as you can also get money for getting gamekeepers banned.

The other significance of the sea eagle is as a symbol of the power of the conservation organisations - every time you see a sea eagle soaring over an empty moorland it quite clearly says, on behalf of the conservationists, "we're in control around here and you'll do what we tell you."
excellent informed post,
I suspect with regard to territories much could be said of wolves, and lynx, both require large territories to co exist with humans, something severely lacking in this small island, as is often supported by the fact,, that not even all the human inhabitants can get along. :-|
 

timbrayford

Well-Known Member
Simply no understanding and then they complain when people feel the need to protect their valuable animals - still maybe marginally better photo than a golden eagle eating a rabbit in a Fenn trap. I am sure CWIS will say its natural predation - maybe when he takes his dog for a walk near his partners Zoo he will change his mind ???
I wouldn't be surprised if he doesn't find a dead Sea Eagle in one of his wusty old twaps soon!
 

Sinistral

Well-Known Member
The problem with sea eagle introductions has been the huge number of these apex predators that have been released into areas much too small to sustain them. They may have been native in parts of the UK in the past but were probably extremely rare. Anyone who has watched an eagle will know that it has a huge territory. In the Hebrides they've released many tens, perhaps 100, sea eagles into an area that might have the physical land mass to sustain a few of them. As a result the sea eagles don't do so very well in terms of the entire environment as they compete with each other, plus they have a significant impact upon the other raptors in the area. Golden eagles in particular seem to have been impacted and I'm seeing a lot less harriers as well, I suspect it is for this reason that the RSPB deny there were harriers on Lewis for example as it seems to me that it is the sea eagles that have wiped them out.

For "conservation" organisations this is, of course, a "win win" situation as they can get money from people for releasing sea eagles and they can get money from people to save the raptors that the sea eagles are killing. If you can blame the "missing" raptors on, say, gamekeepers, then that is an added bonus as you can also get money for getting gamekeepers banned.
Before advancing theories on the predation of other raptors by the WTSE, perhaps you should read the feasibility study on their introduction to the Isle of Wight.
This also deals in some detail with past introductions, and the present situation on the west coast of Scotland & the Isles.

In percentage terms it seems the main food sources of sea eagles is first Carrion of all kinds (as much as 50%), then Fish, followed by Waterbirds, and a few mammals (mostly carcasses). There is very little evidence of them taking live lambs (see 4.2.1.1 onwards) which someone else mentioned.

It feeds on what’s easiest, and what’s at hand which is dead stuff. One phrase which stuck in the reference to gamebirds is that the WTSE is no threat as being the size of a goose “it isn’t an agile hunter“. As such I can’t see it outflying a Golden Eagle, or any other raptor for that matter.
It co-exists with these because it’s adapted to an entirely different menu.:thumb:

http://www.roydennis.org/o/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Isle-of-Wight-WTE-feasibility-April-2019.pdf
 

rms364

Well-Known Member
Before advancing theories on the predation of other raptors by the WTSE, perhaps you should read the feasibility study on their introduction to the Isle of Wight.
This also deals in some detail with past introductions, and the present situation on the west coast of Scotland & the Isles.

In percentage terms it seems the main food sources of sea eagles is first Carrion of all kinds (as much as 50%), then Fish, followed by Waterbirds, and a few mammals (mostly carcasses). There is very little evidence of them taking live lambs (see 4.2.1.1 onwards) which someone else mentioned.

It feeds on what’s easiest, and what’s at hand which is dead stuff. One phrase which stuck in the reference to gamebirds is that the WTSE is no threat as being the size of a goose “it isn’t an agile hunter“. As such I can’t see it outflying a Golden Eagle, or any other raptor for that matter.
It co-exists with these because it’s adapted to an entirely different menu.:thumb:

http://www.roydennis.org/o/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Isle-of-Wight-WTE-feasibility-April-2019.pdf
Doesn’t take much agility to land on a nest of fledglings on the ground and lambs are easy prey for a bird of this size and power but we will all look on to see how things unfold........


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
Before advancing theories on the predation of other raptors by the WTSE, perhaps you should read the feasibility study on their introduction to the Isle of Wight.
This also deals in some detail with past introductions, and the present situation on the west coast of Scotland & the Isles.

In percentage terms it seems the main food sources of sea eagles is first Carrion of all kinds (as much as 50%), then Fish, followed by Waterbirds, and a few mammals (mostly carcasses). There is very little evidence of them taking live lambs (see 4.2.1.1 onwards) which someone else mentioned.

It feeds on what’s easiest, and what’s at hand which is dead stuff. One phrase which stuck in the reference to gamebirds is that the WTSE is no threat as being the size of a goose “it isn’t an agile hunter“. As such I can’t see it outflying a Golden Eagle, or any other raptor for that matter.
It co-exists with these because it’s adapted to an entirely different menu.:thumb:

http://www.roydennis.org/o/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Isle-of-Wight-WTE-feasibility-April-2019.pdf
This doesn't explain why native golden eagles are being extirpated from haunts that for the better part of the last century have harboured them. Roy Dennis might not be the best placed to provide an objective opinion as to the cons in any raptor reintroduction feasibility study, I fear. Still, as rms says above, we will see how this unfolds (again, at the expense of others, in this case the IoW sheep farmers); or not!
 

caorach

Well-Known Member
In percentage terms it seems the main food sources of sea eagles is first Carrion of all kinds
So this Roy bloke who is campaigning for sea eagle releases is telling me that introducing a huge over abundance of an apex predator into a relatively stable ecosystem is going to have no effect at all because they are just going to eat stuff that is already dead, or the sandwiches from their lunchbox?
 

camodog

Well-Known Member
Before advancing theories on the predation of other raptors by the WTSE, perhaps you should read the feasibility study on their introduction to the Isle of Wight.
This also deals in some detail with past introductions, and the present situation on the west coast of Scotland & the Isles.

In percentage terms it seems the main food sources of sea eagles is first Carrion of all kinds (as much as 50%), then Fish, followed by Waterbirds, and a few mammals (mostly carcasses). There is very little evidence of them taking live lambs (see 4.2.1.1 onwards) which someone else mentioned.

It feeds on what’s easiest, and what’s at hand which is dead stuff. One phrase which stuck in the reference to gamebirds is that the WTSE is no threat as being the size of a goose “it isn’t an agile hunter“. As such I can’t see it outflying a Golden Eagle, or any other raptor for that matter.
It co-exists with these because it’s adapted to an entirely different menu.:thumb:

http://www.roydennis.org/o/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/Isle-of-Wight-WTE-feasibility-April-2019.pdf
These individuals are notorious for finding, colating and espousing 'information' to support what they wish for !
It is one thing releasing WTSE's in a relatively sparsely populated area, it is quite another to release them somewhere like the I of W. Here you have lots of people walking the coastline ie....Mr & Mrs 'Dog Walker' with little 'Fifi' or 'Fido' in it's cute tailored coat. Just see the furore unfold when a few of these start being 'picked-off' !
 

The fourth Horseman

Well-Known Member
Ahh bless, need to say a couple of 'hail mary's"?
O
Oh dear I was always told not to mock the afflicted. I should have listened. But then I have met a lot of idiots, some are dead and unfortunately an odd one or two are still alive, just like yourself, and being civilised we have to put up with idiotic bigots. Just glad I put a couple in the larder tonight makes life with fools bearable.
 

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