Available: Available SABLE TROPHY 40-42" - RSA

Bushwack

Well-Known Member
#1
We have ONE tag available for a Sable Antelope trophy in the region 40-42", might even be bigger...first come first serve...


available time: 2015



5 days, 1 arrival, 3 hunting days, 1 departure for:

Trophy Sable bull x 1



Price:
GBP5 335.00 (all inclusive)

Area
: Limpopo Province

Ranch size: 3 200ha
High Fenced: Yes
PH: Myself or PH available
Outfitter: Myself


Included:
· Pickup and return to OR Tambo International;
· Ground transportation;
· Lodging;
· Meals and drinks (Soft drinks, beer, local wine and Bottled water);
· Laundry (Except Sundays);
· Transportation of trophies to local taxidermy;
· Skinning / salting of trophies;
· Hunting permits;
· Service of tracker/skinner;
· Licensed Professional Hunter.

Excluded:
· Airfare,
· Dip/pack cost,
· Shipment costs of trophies to country of hunter,
· Taxidermy cost,
· Staff gratuity,
· Bar account (Brandy, whisky, rum) – but will stop at a convenience store for you.
· Accommodation before and after the safari,
· Items of a personal nature.
 
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Stephenl

Well-Known Member
#4
I have just come back from SA and the farmer (family friend) we stayed and shot at has just sold two breeding stock Sable Rams for R325 000 each, that's about £18k each so with this offer including accommodation etc its is not a bad price for a trophy like that.......
 

MJ75

Well-Known Member
#5
I have just come back from SA and the farmer (family friend) we stayed and shot at has just sold two breeding stock Sable Rams for R325 000 each, that's about £18k each so with this offer including accommodation etc its is not a bad price for a trophy like that.......
A lot of people buy younger males cheaply, rear them on and hope that they achieve a large trophy size which increases their value. However, while this is great for the game farmers I'm not so sure it's great from a hunters perspective. The sable grow up on a game ranch where they are used to people being around and therefore don't have a natural fear of man.

Last year we walked within 50 yards of a sable bull on a game farm as it just stood there and looked at us. It's an animal I'd like to hunt, but only one from truly wild stock, not one that's been farmed.
 

Stephenl

Well-Known Member
#6
Trust me we had a long heated discussion on that very point. The game trade in South Africa is getting huge and will only grow while there is little or no regulation unfortunately.
 

MJ75

Well-Known Member
#7
Trust me we had a long heated discussion on that very point. The game trade in South Africa is getting huge and will only grow while there is little or no regulation unfortunately.
Oh I know, the last two PH's I went out with were also game dealers. In fact one was far more game rancher than PH due to the growing market. The designer bred market for multi coloured antelope seems to have gone mad over there. I was told that Namibia will be looking at importing animals from RSA and so the game farmers are getting ready for that. Several species were being sold at game auctions for more than the cull fees that some people were charging to hunt them.

Potentially this could also have a negative effect for hunters as cheap cull hunts will or already have increased in cost.

In my mind it makes free roaming species that will dig under reserve fences far more appealing than potentially 'tame' animals.

Apologies to the OP for derailing this thread. Perhaps an admin could split it and put the last few posts in the Big Game Hunting sub forum?
 

Bushwack

Well-Known Member
#8
A lot of people buy younger males cheaply, rear them on and hope that they achieve a large trophy size which increases their value. However, while this is great for the game farmers I'm not so sure it's great from a hunters perspective. The sable grow up on a game ranch where they are used to people being around and therefore don't have a natural fear of man.

Last year we walked within 50 yards of a sable bull on a game farm as it just stood there and looked at us. It's an animal I'd like to hunt, but only one from truly wild stock, not one that's been farmed.
fair argument...but also keep in mind that 'every' bunisness has their 'bad apples'...we in the hunting fraternity do get them...
 

Bushwack

Well-Known Member
#9
Trust me we had a long heated discussion on that very point. The game trade in South Africa is getting huge and will only grow while there is little or no regulation unfortunately.
This is Ludicrous, especially the 'smartie' pack animals...I do not support this at all!!


This animal offered is as wild as can be!! 5 bulls was offered to a agent in Denmark via an Outfitter friend of mine - which he offered..., thus this EXCELLENT discounted price...

I will conduct the hunt myself and know the safari area quite well.
 
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Stephenl

Well-Known Member
#11
Hi Bushwhack,

As I mentioned I think your prices are very reasonable after the prices I heard discussed last week!! It was scary!! The discussion I had was with 4 other farmers all in the hunting or game trade and a wild game dealer. It was interesting to hear the points of view and the divide amongst them in what each thought was acceptable or not.

I would say it was a 50/50 split and it's refreshing to know that there are still operators out there ,like yourself, who offer traditional hunting and not just selling what I call "designer animals" for stupid money.
Please pm me when you read this as I am very interested to hear your opinion on the game market in SA and where it's heading .

Regards,

Stephen
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
#12
Most of the areas, if not all in SA are now fenced.

But there is a difference between fenced and fenced! In as much as a fenced area of 20,000 hectares is about as wild as you will get in SA these days, compared to say 1000 hectares where you will see the fence in the first 10 minutes of hunting.

Animals such as Sable and Roan are always, and have always been expensive, and are not easy to relocate and take time to establish on any area. Some years back I got involved with sending DNA samples of Giant Sable out to Stellenbosch university form the museum collection I curated. This was part of the scheme to protect Giant Sable in Angola, shortly after which we were visited by an expert Sable breeder in SA.

Hunting for these magnificent creatures has become a more put and take basis on areas in SA, and it is in a fashion to order as demand will always be there. True Safari hunting which I have been lucky to undertake a few times is now becoming rare and totally out of the average mans reach. Therefore the put and take areas are now filling the gap for those that still want a touch of wildness and old Africa that is within their grasp.

I have no real issue with this as long as it is done ethically and professionally. However when it comes to large cats such as Lion in such situations I think this oversteps the mark on ethical and professional issues.
 

MJ75

Well-Known Member
#13
fair argument...but also keep in mind that 'every' bunisness has their 'bad apples'...we in the hunting fraternity do get them...
Hmmmmm

I'm not actually calling anyone a bad apple. Last year we were given a very good insight into the SA game ranching industry. No I don't want to hunt blue pink and yellow springbok so that I can arrange a pretty display in the living room. But I do understand that game ranching can benefit populations of certain species such as bontebok.

However, I've enough first hand practical experience with various animals to understand that those born in captivity that grow up around humans will never be truly wild, and quite possibly even tame. The sable bull I walked close too really wasn't afraid of us, however it was on a farm where no hunting takes place.

Like Malc has said, truly wild hunting opportunities in Africa are beyond the reach of most, I can draw direct comparison to SA farms to UK based Stillwater trout farms that cater for the working man, whereas some wild brown trout river fisheries are simply too expensive for those that catch rainbows in ponds...

Again, this isn't really the right thread for this discussion, but what species in RSA will always certainly be wild? I was thinking warthogs amongst others...
 

Bushwack

Well-Known Member
#14
Hmmmmm

I'm not actually calling anyone a bad apple. Last year we were given a very good insight into the SA game ranching industry. No I don't want to hunt blue pink and yellow springbok so that I can arrange a pretty display in the living room...
Very true...If the game breeder in the exotics do want to make money (and 'business' is business) - good for them...BUT in my eyes is hurts SA...especially for me in the hunting environment...you just said you dont want to hunt these 'smartie pack' animals, so wat do you and others do, don't book any other safaris in SA because of this image send out...'The message' if i was a hunter would read it as of South Africans are selling 'pen raised animals' (and some do...as i said the 'bad apples')...

On the 1000ha farms issue; guy's, as i see it you can have an excellent safari on a 1000ha farm and a really bad safari on 100 000ha concession...i have been there, it had been experienced. IT'S IS WHAT YOU MAKE OF IT...Trying to market hunting safari's for and or SA is quit difficult these days (PH's doesn't get work, so they registerd as Outfitters...killing the market with shorter hunts and 'cut throat' pricing...now a days if you have a farm in SA, you can registered as an Outfitter 2 days after you passed your PH cours, where back in the day...i had to do 3 years PH work before any application was considered to become an Outfitter) ), because PH's and Outfitters in my eyes are taking the 'short routes' with their clients trying to score a 100% harvesting rate with each client...this is not hunting...hunting cannot and will not ever be guaranteed...s#%t still can happen in the hunting fields...all 'real hunters' knows this...

yet again , just my 2 cents...
 
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Bushwack

Well-Known Member
#15
Most of the areas, if not all in SA are now fenced.

But there is a difference between fenced and fenced! In as much as a fenced area of 20,000 hectares is about as wild as you will get in SA these days, compared to say 1000 hectares where you will see the fence in the first 10 minutes of hunting.

Hunting for these magnificent creatures has become a more put and take basis on areas in SA, and it is in a fashion to order as demand will always be there. True Safari hunting which I have been lucky to undertake a few times is now becoming rare and totally out of the average mans reach. Therefore the put and take areas are now filling the gap for those that still want a touch of wildness and old Africa that is within their grasp.
In SA defense (Namibia included)...will probably be in the near future the ONLY area/s to hunt in Africa...private land has its benefit...Poaching will destroy and we can see it in Botswana (and Kenya in the 1980's) after hunting was stopped in 2014. Some smaller species is on the brink of extinction.
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
#16
I hunted Botswana in 1990, with Gordon Cundells outfit out of Maun. At that time the Wildebeest population had just crashed to an all time low due to a huge fence being out across the Kalahari. That did more damage to the wild life than any poachers gun.

Botswana still allows hunting, but only behind wire. A friend of mine has just visited there with his family and had a good trip.
Without doubt SA and now probably Namibia is leading the way with conservation projects and re introduction of species. But my point for the hunting side is that I personally do not agree with some fenced hunts, such as Lion, Buff etc. I also see no sense in breeding different coloured beasts. But I understand that some people like to collect various coloured Springbok.

I have hunted unfenced Kalahari Springbok and also Cape Springbok. Basically the same beast I know, but the Cape tends to be smaller in stature and horn length. As for some of the smaller animals becoming extinct, that is mostly down to habitat destruction, not so much poaching. However the main problems in most if not all African countries is corruption, poaching and wars.

Sorry if this has taken the thread off course slightly!
 

MJ75

Well-Known Member
#17
Very true...If the game breeder in the exotics do want to make money (and 'business' is business) - good for them...BUT in my eyes is hurts SA...especially for me in the hunting environment...you just said you dont want to hunt these 'smartie pack' animals, so wat do you and others do, don't book any other safaris in SA because of this image send out...'The message' if i was a hunter would read it as of South Africans are selling 'pen raised animals' (and some do...as i said the 'bad apples')...

On the 1000ha farms issue; guy's, as i see it you can have an excellent safari on a 1000ha farm and a really bad safari on 100 000ha concession...i have been there, it had been experienced. IT'S IS WHAT YOU MAKE OF IT...Trying to market hunting safari's for and or SA is quit difficult these days (PH's doesn't get work, so they registerd as Outfitters...killing the market with shorter hunts and 'cut throat' pricing...now a days if you have a farm in SA, you can registered as an Outfitter 2 days after you passed your PH cours, where back in the day...i had to do 3 years PH work before any application was considered to become an Outfitter) ), because PH's and Outfitters in my eyes are taking the 'short routes' with their clients trying to score a 100% harvesting rate with each client...this is not hunting...hunting cannot and will not ever be guaranteed...s#%t still can happen in the hunting fields...all 'real hunters' knows this...

yet again , just my 2 cents...
This time in two weeks I'll be half way through my 7 day hunt in South Africa with Settlers Safari's again. Baboon and bushpig are two of the species I'm after, it's been explained quite clearly that neither are guaranteed. So I'd call this 'real' hunting. Bushbuck, Cape Grysbuck and warthog are also species I wish to try for whilst there, none are mass produced farmed animals.

People are welcome to correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe ethical hunting can take place in RSA if you choose the correct species, outfitter and location. I just don't want to hunt a put and take farm, at least not knowingly! Like Malc, there are a number of species I'd never hunt in RSA, I can understand the arguments for and against canned lion etc. It's just not for me personally.

I think one of the major problems is that a lot of hunters don't understand RSA hunting too well. Many don't know about the fences or game ranching boom over there. I honestly think many who have not visited, imagine massive open savannahs etc after watching wildlife documentaries based in Kenya or Tanzania...
 

Bushwack

Well-Known Member
#18
...People are welcome to correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe ethical hunting can take place in RSA if you choose the correct species, outfitter and location. I just don't want to hunt a put and take farm, at least not knowingly! Like Malc, there are a number of species I'd never hunt in RSA, I can understand the arguments for and against canned lion etc. It's just not for me personally...

exactly...take a look at this for instance...:D


We have ONE tag available for a Sable Antelope trophy in the region 40-42", might even be bigger...first come first serve...


available time: 2015



5 days, 1 arrival, 3 hunting days, 1 departure for:

Trophy Sable bull x 1



Price:
GBP5 335.00 (all inclusive)

Area
: Limpopo Province

Ranch size: 3 200ha
High Fenced: Yes
PH: Myself or PH available
Outfitter: Myself


Included:
· Pickup and return to OR Tambo International;
· Ground transportation;
· Lodging;
· Meals and drinks (Soft drinks, beer, local wine and Bottled water);
· Laundry (Except Sundays);
· Transportation of trophies to local taxidermy;
· Skinning / salting of trophies;
· Hunting permits;
· Service of tracker/skinner;
· Licensed Professional Hunter.

Excluded:
· Airfare,
· Dip/pack cost,
· Shipment costs of trophies to country of hunter,
· Taxidermy cost,
· Staff gratuity,
· Bar account (Brandy, whisky, rum) – but will stop at a convenience store for you.
· Accommodation before and after the safari,
· Items of a personal nature.
 
Last edited:

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