Dead badgers

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Bavarianbrit

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Funny how they all are only ever seen deceased laid out on the nearside of the road and never ever splattered in the middle of the road like happens to rta foxes.
I think I know the answer BTW.
 

joed

Well-Known Member
Yes. Badgers are notoriously poor at crossing the road. Too tentative...they need to give it a good charge like the foxes do
 

EMcC

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Sometimes they have 'little' holes in them as if they have been run over with spiked tyres normally used in the winter !
 

tikka_madras

Well-Known Member
And then they bloat, and rot, and swell until one hot sunny day they explode, sending dead badger goo all over the place. As my wife found out to her cost when walking past one one day.
 

kes

Well-Known Member
The Welsh government is asking anyone who comes across a dead badger to call it in for collection. Might be for bovine TB tests or to see if it leaks when full of water. There is a warning not to approach pre-deceased badgers as they can 'cause serious injury' and to call the RSPCA. Might be interesting to note the outcome of holes and BTB?
 

The fourth Horseman

Well-Known Member
We see an awful lot of dead Brocks n the Spring of the year on our roads. Despite some beliefs that they may have holes in them, you will find most are young boars that are evicted from the family sett at cubbing time, and are a little disorientated when chucked out. Most of them will never have been near a road before, but are without territory and very similar to young roe bucks who keep moving until they find a peaceful unoccupied spot.

:scared:
 

Apthorpe

Well-Known Member
I think this is a fairly silly thread to be starting in public on a pro-shooting website and one with some pretty irresponsible insinuations.
Being a considerably more solid animal than a fox, they get knocked to the side as deer do. They tend to walk along boundaries anyway given the choice. And finally, being black and white, they blend into the road markings when they get run over in the centre of the road.
 

big ears

Well-Known Member
I think this is a fairly silly thread to be starting in public on a pro-shooting website and one with some pretty irresponsible insinuations.
Being a considerably more solid animal than a fox, they get knocked to the side as deer do. They tend to walk along boundaries anyway given the choice. And finally, being black and white, they blend into the road markings when they get run over in the centre of the road.
There is the answer and a very pertinent comment
 

EMcC

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Once dead and bloated Crows and Magpies have a go at them and they end up with holes in them. As a result some people get the wrong idea.
 

bobjs

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last one i seen who failed his highway code looked at the examiner with tainted eyes,

a bit like this,
 

SimpleSimon

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I see a lot of living wildlife crossing the roads locally. I work a shift pattern which often means I'm driving around dawn or dusk. Aside from squirrels the most common LIVE animal I see on the roads is badgers. It stands to reason that they're also the most common dead one...
 

tackb

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I was told they were dumped by pikeys that had been using them for badger baiting , don't know how much truth there is in that?
 

old keeper

Well-Known Member
I've never understood why anyone would carry a badger (they're no lightweight) across fields and eventually put them by the roadside, just doesn't make sense.
 

TonyR

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I ran into a Badger on the road ,it was a large animal and I considered it a danger to other road users so I put it on the grass verge,perhaps a lot of other people do the same ?
Went past the Badger the next day and someone in a tractor had driven onto the verge and over the Badger.:eek:
 

Bavarianbrit

Well-Known Member
It is just odd to me that they are estimated to be at the same population levels as foxes in the UK and I almost never see a deceased fox on the road in south UK.
I almost never have seen any dead uns on the roadside in Germany so does this mean that UK badgers are just less road aware?
Insinuations??? having a larf.
 

plonker

Well-Known Member
It is just odd to me that they are estimated to be at the same population levels as foxes in the UK and I almost never see a deceased fox on the road in south UK.
I almost never have seen any dead uns on the roadside in Germany so does this mean that UK badgers are just less road aware?
Insinuations??? having a larf.
Dead foxes on the road down here everywhere,seen 3 on the way home (10 mile drive)
Dave
 
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