Gin traps

CarlW

Well-Known Member
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Thought you guys might like to see a picture of a couple of the 750-plus gin traps we pull out of our place in Mozambique every year. Guy on the left, holding the trap is a recently-captured poacher, the middle guy is Farai, our chief scout, and the fellow on the right is Alexander, one of our stick leaders.

The harm the traps do is immense but we are slowly winning the battle.

PS have never posted a photo before so let me know if it doesn't appear!

Kind regards,

Carl
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
View attachment 101649

Thought you guys might like to see a picture of a couple of the 750-plus gin traps we pull out of our place in Mozambique every year. Guy on the left, holding the trap is a recently-captured poacher, the middle guy is Farai, our chief scout, and the fellow on the right is Alexander, one of our stick leaders.

The harm the traps do is immense but we are slowly winning the battle.

PS have never posted a photo before so let me know if it doesn't appear!

Kind regards,

Carl
Picture came out ok.....


I have been on the bus from Mapoto to inuabanne lol

Tim.243
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
Thanks, Tim. I hope you liked the country: a very special place, eh!
Iv'e been twice @ 6 weeks a time.

Taught 4 Boer diving off the beach which is a task in its self lol the local bread ( pao) or how ever you spell it is good up till lunch time then you can play cricket with it!

Being the son of a bricklayer I picked out all the good bricks and chucked the green un-fired ones they tried to load on the Bucky!!

Tim.243
 

BRYAN

Well-Known Member
Carl.
Do you have a trap in the UK that you would be willing to sell to me (for ornamentation only).

Kindest regards Bryan.
 

Frank Homes

Well-Known Member
Carl

I have hunted twice in Niassa and we never encountered any gin traps there. Which part of Moz are you in? And I agree it’s a magical place.

F
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
Iv'e been twice @ 6 weeks a time.

Taught 4 Boer diving off the beach which is a task in its self lol the local bread ( pao) or how ever you spell it is good up till lunch time then you can play cricket with it!

Being the son of a bricklayer I picked out all the good bricks and chucked the green un-fired ones they tried to load on the Bucky!!

Tim.243
Funny. The Mozambicans are really hit-and-miss when it comes to making bricks. We have given up buying them and now burn our own (standing over the guys to make sure they keep the fires hot enough for the full three days.

Lucky you diving on the coast: am very envious.

Kind regards,

Carl
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
Carl.
Do you have a trap in the UK that you would be willing to sell to me (for ornamentation only).

Kindest regards Bryan.
Hi Bryan,

You can have some for nought. Will bring a couple to the UK for you in the spring. They do a few different styles. Made from old lorry springs. Rather clever really if they were not so destructive. Drop me a line in March to remind me.

Kind regards,

Carl
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
Carl

I have hunted twice in Niassa and we never encountered any gin traps there. Which part of Moz are you in? And I agree it’s a magical place.

F
Hi Frank,

We are near Macossa in Manica province. I am glad you enjoyed Niassa: there is very good hunting up there, eh!

If only we can nail the poaching problem, Mozambique has the potential to act as a real reservoir for African wildlife. We lost a scout to elephant poachers in February: shot through the stomach with an AK by ivory poachers. This is a war and hunters are on the front line. I don't get many vegetarians offering to come out and contribute!

Best,

Carl
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
It’s difficult to see, but I do hope that poacher’s fingers are in the jaws!
Hey Goathunter,

Off-camera, Farai and Alexander gave him a few "life lessons" before and during taking him to the police station (which is a five-hour drive).

Best wishes,

Carl
 

goathunter1

Well-Known Member
Good stuff. I hope he remembers them for a long time. What will happen now? A small fine paid by a big man somewhere and he’ll be out in no time?
 

A Guy Out West

Well-Known Member
Those are some BIG traps. I agree that they might be of collector value. If your getting 750 a year, it might be worth it to see if you can sell the whole lot. Shipping charges might ruin it, but check with the following folks, they may be of help. Cumberlands Northwest Trappers Supply

On further thought check with these guys, N.A.T.C.A. they will likely be able to tell you if there is a market for them and what they are worth, free of charge.
 
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shakey jake

Well-Known Member
I do feel for the blokes who do the trapping, im sure they know the wrong but looking at the guy in the photo hes clearly poor and just doing it to earn a living, i doubt it pays well and hes probably exploited by the more wealthy. Its a shame more value cant be attached to keeping stuff alive.
Shakey
 

BRYAN

Well-Known Member
Hi Bryan,

You can have some for nought. Will bring a couple to the UK for you in the spring. They do a few different styles. Made from old lorry springs. Rather clever really if they were not so destructive. Drop me a line in March to remind me.

Kind regards,

Carl
Hi Carl.
That is most kind and I will try to remember your offer in march. Also I will obviously pay postage or courier and put a few quid into a charity. I admire the work that you do but will never have the funds to experience Africa.

Kindest regards Bryan.
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
Good stuff. I hope he remembers them for a long time. What will happen now? A small fine paid by a big man somewhere and he’ll be out in no time?
He will be fined, will not pay it, will be rearrested a few months later, jailed for a couple of months, then out poaching again by the next dry season.
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
Those are some BIG traps. I agree that they might be of collector value. If your getting 750 a year, it might be worth it to see if you can sell the whole lot. Shipping charges might ruin it, but check with the following folks, they may be of help. Cumberlands Northwest Trappers Supply

On further thought check with these guys, N.A.T.C.A. they will likely be able to tell you if there is a market for them and what they are worth, free of charge.
That is a really interesting thought. I will contact those guys. Thank you. Currently we use them as rebar in foundations and dam walls so that they don't get stolen and sold back to the poachers.

The real goal is to nail all of the blacksmiths who are making them but we've only managed to get hold of a few of them so far. Really skilled men for whom one can't help but have a grudging respect.
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
I do feel for the blokes who do the trapping, im sure they know the wrong but looking at the guy in the photo hes clearly poor and just doing it to earn a living, i doubt it pays well and hes probably exploited by the more wealthy. Its a shame more value cant be attached to keeping stuff alive.
Shakey
Hi Shakey,

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Does this photo make you feel less sorry for him?

However, I agree: we must include some pity as well as anger. These guys have nothing. If you and I were living as Africans in his village, we would probably be poachers too.

By the way, most of our staff are ex-poachers. One learns more about hunting from them than from any white guy.

Kind regards,

Carl
 

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