Giving up shooting

varmint223

Well-Known Member
The time has come for me to give up shooting and move on to other things.

Just wanted to thanks to the many good people on this forum.

All the best everyone
 

arron

Well-Known Member
What has brought this on , the older I get the less inclined I am to pull the trigger ! I am sure the time will come for me also but enjoy the rewards of the food value to much at the moment , atb what ever you take up
 

kes

Well-Known Member
For me, age would be a factor - older you get the harder it gets.
I too am finding it harder to pull the trigger and am doing more to conserve rather than serve.
So, at some point we all find it less appealing - however, I am loathe to give up entirely since getting and keeping firearms has proved a real effort. A farmer friend of mine still has his shotguns in a safe I had made for him - he's 84.
 

Blaser243

Well-Known Member
Good luck to you, hope you enjoy your r next adventure. Plenty will say “don’t give up”, and they could be right, but only you know. You can always start again - bit of a hassle, but you’ll know the pitfalls next time!

My father was never an avid shooting man, and whilst he did enjoy the odd day, he seemed to loose interest after I was born. He kept his licence until I was about 10 or so, but I can’t recall him ever shooting during my childhood.

I suppose I’ve always had more of a passion for it. Started (with his guidance and an air rifle) when I was around 6 and then he my own air rifle at 13. Shotgun at 16 and rifles from 17. 25 years on and I can’t image not shooting - although I do have other interests and find that I do one thing intensively for a while then swap to another. Keeps things fresh and entertaining still.
 

varmint223

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the good wishes guys , I can't say exactly has happened it just hasn't been as enjoyable for a while now, the farmer said his land will always be there for me anytime which was very good of him because I have became good friends with the whole family and will still go up to visit or help him out .... think the whole thing started about 10 months ago when I didn't want to take the shot...I won't say I'll never go back to it but it seems unlikely and there is some minor health issues just now so think the time is right to have a change.


ATB
Tommy
 
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zambezi

Well-Known Member
... I can’t imagine not shooting - although I do have other interests and find that I do one thing intensively for a while then swap to another. Keeps things fresh and entertaining still.

Same here. I have shot rifles off and on for over 40 years. I also have had other diverse hobbies [DIY, scuba [retired], sea kayaking, hiking, bushcraft, travel, whittling, etc] and am episodically busier with one or other. But I absolutely cannot see a cessation to my shooting unless the eyes went.

Several folk I have spoken to have talked of diminishing stomach for shooting live quarry. Various reasons given, but generally it seems that they have arrived at their new position principally by emotion. I.e. the reasons for foxing as part of a land management issue remain compelling. Shooting deer for venison stands up to any scrutiny. But for the individuals in question it ceases to be palatable.

I fully respect that position. But what about punching paper consistently or ringing gongs at distance? Surely there is still fun to be had?
 

Hayduke

Well-Known Member
All the very best V223, I know plenty who have knocked it on the head, and one or two chaps who wanted to but couldn't because it was their livelihood and only source of income. I will stop one day, no regrets.

Please consider passing your permissions over to some eager youngsters. It's hard to get a foot on the ladder, with some old guns holding on to more land than they can manage. Share the good times.
 

varmint223

Well-Known Member
There are a couple of main reasons as well one of which is a reoccurring eye problem, the up side to it is that I have arranged with the farmer to allow a guy on to shoot ..he is an ex army chap who was badly injured in Afghanistan so he is delighted because he couldn't get a permission of his own so that has put a smile on my face that I could help him out.

Atb
Tommy
 

JAYB

Administrator
Site Staff
Ill health forced me into it, strange at first but you soon adapt and take pleasure in your other interests. The strange thing is, I find, when I am out in the country I still think like a stalker, looking for cover, checking the backstop etc, every time I see a beast. God knows why it's in no danger from me, just can't break the habit.

John
 

User00025

Well-Known Member
Ill health forced me into it, strange at first but you soon adapt and take pleasure in your other interests. The strange thing is, I find, when I am out in the country I still think like a stalker, looking for cover, checking the backstop etc, every time I see a beast. God knows why it's in no danger from me, just can't break the habit.

John

That's what frightens me about giving up John, Oh and lack of low cholesterol meat. :eek:
 
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