Injured Roe Buck

#1
Received a phone from a local farmer at about 21:00 last. Can I come and have a look at a Roe that he thinks may have been hit by a car as it is acting strangely (does not move away when approached). Anyway it's the big field where they are combining in the standing crop at the end near the road.

So off I go drove into the field - parked up and walk the last 50 yards to where the Deer should be. Naturally, can't see a thing. So start searching along the only remaining tram line in the standing crop and there it is. It's sort hunched up with it's head facing back and half standing. It takes no notice of my approach and is despatched with a head shot from about 5/6 yards.


Upon inspection it has a very large wound to the lower right neck which is black smelly and full of maggots. Poor thing must have been suffering for sometime.
 

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#4
Well done.

Any other visible damage at all?

Just wondering whether that really is the result of car damage or rather an injury from a fight with another buck, a shot, wire, etc? I am struggling to think how a car could cause that type of injury.
 

Monkey Spanker

Well-Known Member
#7
I would think that was a bad shot looking at the width of it. Could be barbed wire then opened up by fly strike but it's not really that shape of wound and the angle looks wrong. I don't suppose we will ever know, but either way you've done the right thing and ended its suffering. I had a muntjac with deep fly struck wounds last year and the smell was just horrendous!
MS
 

Glyn 1

Well-Known Member
#8
Yes, that's what I was thinking.
Can't be that because neck shots are either hit or miss and they never go wrong or at least that's what I keep hearing!

Well done to Oxfordfowler for dealing with the situation.

One thing to note with injuries, however they are caused, is that there is often a big difference in the outcome and survivability between winter and summer when fly strike is inevitable.
 

Paul 600

Well-Known Member
#9
Can't be that because neck shots are either hit or miss and they never go wrong or at least that's what I keep hearing!

Well done to Oxfordfowler for dealing with the situation.

One thing to note with injuries, however they are caused, is that there is often a big difference in the outcome and survivability between winter and summer when fly strike is inevitable.
:thumb: Totally agree Glyn. Well done Oxfordfowler on ending suffering however it was caused.
 

mudman

Well-Known Member
#13
Looks very much like a shot grazing the neck, unzipping the skin and breaking up the muscles and tissues underneath exposing a the whole lot to flies. Being on the neck it cannot lick the area clean and has no dount suffered for several days.

If this had occurred during the winter I would say there is a good chance the beast would have survived. It is the maggots which have done for it.
 

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