Sauer 100

the scudd

Well-Known Member
hi has anyone tried one of these out, whats the opinion say compared to tikka or other rifles in the same price bracket. thanks
 

Glen of Imaal

Well-Known Member
A friend has ordered one in .222, still waiting for delivery. They haven't arrived in the republic yet. Very reasonable price, should give the Tikka a run for its money. Tempted to get one myself but I'll check out his first!
 

Colonel

Well-Known Member
I've heard that the barrels are not threaded into the receivers, does anyone know if this is correct.
 

Moray Outfitting

Well-Known Member
We are due a couple on next delivery. Only briefest of handling thus far - will be doing a thorough work out once get full hands on.

Sauer support us - so thats an open declaration at the start; but also given choice of the range I have to say we love the 101 to pieces and thats's the model we choose for the course rifles. The 100 follows quite closely with the most obvious difference being the different safety. If that's the only fundamental difference, it is going to be a cracker I suspect.

Certainly the 101 barrel is a 'sweated' fit as opposed to threaded, so I would think it very likely the 100 is the same.
 

JTO

Well-Known Member
I've heard that the barrels are not threaded into the receivers, does anyone know if this is correct.
Steyr SSG barrels are not threaded into the receivers and it 'might' be a problem for rebarreling, after 12,000 rounds.
 

tarponhead

Well-Known Member
I see that Braces are selling them in various calibres. I fancy one in .223, given they are quite a bit cheaper than The Tikka T3x in the same spec. I'd prefer a Mauser M12 though - much nicer stock than the T3 but a little bit more money.
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
As far as I remember the 100 can be re-barrelled (Report shot show 2016) the 101 and M12 cannot. My take is the customers will wise up and steer clear of the 101/M12. On a German Forum there were some complaints about the 100 having a make fit stock with washers making up space and pillar height?? It looked like a real botch job. Not sure if they all come like that. I would give the 100 a try over 101/m12 as stock issues can always be fixed but a rifle that can't be re-barrelled is useless. Who would a buy a second hand one with unknown round count?
edi
 

Cris

Well-Known Member
Not really convinced about the argument against a sporting rifle for recreational use that can't be rebarreled as many will out live the owner befor the barrel goes. At even a couple of hundred rounds a year thats a long life for the majority of recreational stalkers. If you know you will be putting thousands down range a year a different rifle would suit of course.
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
Well Cris, you can see it any way you like, a barrel has a certain amount of shots life span. We as firearm dealers would not take a used "throw away" rifle in as a trade in. At the moment the last 22-250/243/25-06 rifles we took in 50% were re-barrelled due to being shot out. Of course the owners said round count was low, done nothing...bla bla.
I can shoot my fathers rifle and my son can shoot it now too, it would have gone in the bin if it wouldn't have had a new barrel fitted. Now it shoots better than it ever did in it's 50 years.
edi
 

Border

Well-Known Member
Pretty sure as Eddy points out that the 100 can be rebarreled as it has a conventional screw fit barrel.
re rebarreling, not all barrels get shot out, some are changed for moderator rust at muzzle or for change of cartridge.
Point is, a screw fit barrel is a better option than the sweat fit option.
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
That's it Border.
Not all rifles shoot well, things can go wrong along the way. Rust being one or even just wanting a calibre change.
If one buys a second hand rifle there is often some risk that it might not shoot well or be too ammo fussy etc. If one can change a barrel one can at least say the risk costs max xxx £ to get fixed.
edi
 

Moray Outfitting

Well-Known Member
Grief - now if we can just nail the shooter on the grassy knoll conundrum whilst we are at it ** :D

I refer again to the Emo Philips Die Heretic sketch as being so illuminating to some of these debates.

All are entitled to a view - that's why its a forum, but the amount of confuddlement that arises is huge. Remember - some people might believe things that are written on the interweb; even on SD - dogmatically ;)

The Sauer 100 is a sweated fit barrel. as is the Sauer 101. Both have bolt lugs that lock into the barrel rather than the action - which alone makes rebarrelling from a non factory tube harder. A sweated fit barrel can be changed - its not a fun job and possibly more fraught than a threaded model.

If barrel changing concerns apply to you in reality or just another thing that keeps you awake at night, then it is something to keep in mind. But keep perspective - a tiny proportion of standard sporting rifles undergo a barrel change - by and large.

Build quality - not yet really wrung one out - but will be doing so shortly - that is the 100. Having used/ sold several dozens of 101's and utilising 101's as course rifles - giving them a weekly diet that surpasses the average sporting users use over a decade or more - and several years down the line now - no nasty surprises and no failures. As clients can testify - the main course 243 with 7000 rounds and counting continues to rip tiny holes in the centre of the DSC1 target with ( almost ) boring regularity.

This isnt gain saying against other comments - opinions are individualistic and who can realistically argue with another person's conclusions - from their experience. But just to flag consideration in context. :tiphat:
 

Moray Outfitting

Well-Known Member
** per post above. Grassy knoll - little known fact was that a half eaten packet of Eccles cakes were found next to a 6.5 case - both hidden by a copy of Tractor Fanciers Monthly. QED it was CSL!
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
I went by this or a similar report from the shot show. Maybe I misunderstood.

https://www.all4shooters.com/en/Shooting/rifles/Sauer-Sohn-S100-S404-Synchro-SC-bolt-action-rifles/
Now Sauer & Sohn is raising the ante once more by launching the S100 model with pared down technology and features. Initial indications are that the basic model of this unbeatably low-price bolt-action rifle will change hands for as little as €1000, without asking the owner to accept any real compromises in terms of its practical suitability out in the field.

The shape of the receiver’s outer surfaces has been simplified, the barrel is no longer attached by a sophisticated mechanism – it is merely screwed into the case – and the safety and trigger unit have been modified. The safety is now found to the left of the receiver, and no longer perched on the bolt sleeve. It will be interesting to see what kind of reception the brand-new Sauer & Sohn S100 will get in future.

edi

ps: Unhappy German customer. Last picture is nice, with the stack of washers.
https://forum.wildundhund.de/showthread.php?109075-Sauer-100-unter-aller-Kanone-und-nicht-Sauer-Like!&highlight=sauer100
 
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Cris

Well-Known Member
Well Cris, you can see it any way you like, a barrel has a certain amount of shots life span. We as firearm dealers would not take a used "throw away" rifle in as a trade in. At the moment the last 22-250/243/25-06 rifles we took in 50% were re-barrelled due to being shot out. Of course the owners said round count was low, done nothing...bla bla.
I can shoot my fathers rifle and my son can shoot it now too, it would have gone in the bin if it wouldn't have had a new barrel fitted. Now it shoots better than it ever did in it's 50 years.
edi
Well edu as you say, you can see it any way you like. Fact is you will have to put thousands of rounds through it and abuse it before it wares out and as a dealer of course you have the right to decline any trade in if you are not happy with it just like the original purchaser had the choice not of buy if it was not going to be the right type of rifle for them.
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
Well edu as you say, you can see it any way you like. Fact is you will have to put thousands of rounds through it and abuse it before it wares out and as a dealer of course you have the right to decline any trade in if you are not happy with it just like the original purchaser had the choice not of buy if it was not going to be the right type of rifle for them.
As most rifles, even the cheapest US brands can be re-barrelled it would be nice to make the customer aware of this disadvantage. It is a bit like buying a car with a motor that can't be changed.
And...who say's thousands of rounds? Who guarantees that and to what accuracy?
edi
 

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