Sharpening Mora knives

Gameking

Well-Known Member
#1
Gents

I usually sharpen my pocket knives with a Spyderco Sharpmaker .

I have 3 Mora knives that were razor sharp when new but now need a touch up.

The trouble is they are skandi grind so not compatible with the 40 degree angle that the sharpmaker uses on the 'normal' flat grinds most knives have.

How do you sharpen the Moras ?

I can get most knives sharp with the Sharpmaker though not 'scary sharp' as shown on the Sal Glasser (CEO Spyderco) you tube video for Spyderco sharpeners - any tips on how to do this please ?

thanks
 

NoIDeer

Well-Known Member
#2
Tried everything myself, just started using a 1000/3000 japanese water stone and leather strop. You can get any knife scary sharp with a bit of work.
 
#4
I always use a Diamond sharpening block (lidl under £10) and finish with a strip of card coated with Brasso.
Place the card on a slightly damp work surface and strop the blade.
I get an edge with a high polish comparable to a Scalpel.
 

OISÍN

Well-Known Member
#5
Check out Knivesandtools.co.uk several good options but expensive £200-£600, but you are ensured of a good job, you need Japanese water-stones but you also need the angle to be correct so a good angle guide is invaluable.
 
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#6
Or try the Wicked Edge sharpener - I've had one for a couple of years and I'm delighted with it.

People in the village now drop their kitchen knives round to be sharpened ;)
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
#10
As they are cheap and easy to keep keen ,I use a blade tech another cheap item, No I would't use one on one of my hand made blades as they rip steel like wood shavings but work well enough for the great little knife like the mora.
 
#13
I use various methods but the quickest and easiest is a £5 Kitchen Devils ceramic sharpening wheel from Asda and then a stop on some leather. Brings up all my knives sharp enough to shave my forearm. On the down side I get funny looks at work when I keep turning up with bald patches on my arms!
 

hybridfiat

Well-Known Member
#15
As a former butcher, boner and slicer, I have to say that the higher the polish the less likely it is to cut tissue well or give good longevity. A certain amount of micro serration on the blade is helpful in cutting diverse materials and tissue. Don't obsess with a 'Razor' polish just get that bevel perfectly flat. If you do that a plain Aluminium Oxide stone will suffice. A Japanese stone is difficult to get right but a GOOD double sided diamond hone is best. Don't go for an 'ultrafine'.
Get a sharpening guide. Learning to keep a blade in exactly the same angle as it passes over the surface of a stone/hone takes months of constant practice. It took me (a qualified butcher) 5 months of sharpening a blade twice a day every working day to get an edge even approaching that of an experienced boner. With a good guide it can be done in a day.
Remember that with time and sharpening the blade gets narrower and getting a decent bevel harder so put the blade flat on the coarse side periodically and take some thickness away.
Sharpening angles.png
 
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hybridfiat

Well-Known Member
#16
I use various methods but the quickest and easiest is a £5 Kitchen Devils ceramic sharpening wheel from Asda and then a stop on some leather. Brings up all my knives sharp enough to shave my forearm. On the down side I get funny looks at work when I keep turning up with bald patches on my arms!
When I was a butcher my forearms were permanently bald :)
 

pipe man

Well-Known Member
#17
I use a lansky on 17 and then strop on leather.But i sometimes just use the angle of the scandi grind flat on a stone and i get a very good working edge.
 

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