Speed limit for twin cab?

daw

Well-Known Member
The following is from the national police site:

'Most double cab pick ups would fall into the class of dual purpose vehicle (examples of a double cab pick up are vehicles such as Mitsubishi Warrior and a Ford Ranger). A dual purpose vehicle is;
◾constructed/adapted for carriage of both passengers and goods
◾a vehicle with an unladen weight not exceeding 2040 kgs
◾constructed/adapted that the driving power of the engine can be transmitted to all wheels
◾must have rigid roof, transverse passenger seats and rear windows amongst other things.

The national speed limits applicable to dual purpose vehicles (when not drawing a trailer) are the same as those for a car:
◾motorway 70mph
◾dual carriageway 70mph
◾single carriageway 60mph
◾built up area 30mph'

But my Navara twin cab has a 'mass in service' of 2160kg according to the V5 which is above 2040kg and is therefore a LGV and not a dual purpose vehicle. So restricted to 50, 60 and 70 as opposed to 60, 70 and 70. The V5 states it is a LGV.

Am I correct please?

David
 

Coddy

Well-Known Member
Just drive it the same as a car.

The worst things are the likes of Caddy's etc, with are 50 in a 60 and 60 in a 70.
 

howy308

Well-Known Member
After being on a speed awareness course I was shocked to find out the speed limit of pick ups are the same as a van. As above it is 50 in a 60 and 60 in a 70
 

howy308

Well-Known Member
Sorry pal but if you check you will see that I am correct. I only got to know from the course. I have had pickups for 7 years and was shocked when they showed us the chart. But the people running the course may be wrong and if so I apologise
 

Ranger22

Well-Known Member
After being on a speed awareness course I was shocked to find out the speed limit of pick ups are the same as a van. As above it is 50 in a 60 and 60 in a 70
I just recently did a driving examination with an ex police class1 trainer. He had me driving at 60 in my Ranger and told me I can drive my L200 at these speeds too.

think you have been miss informed
 

daw

Well-Known Member
Just drive it the same as a car.

The worst things are the likes of Caddy's etc, with are 50 in a 60 and 60 in a 70.
My point is that the Navara is subject to the same lower speed restrictions as a Caddy, I think!!??
 

daw

Well-Known Member
I do not think you are entirely correct sir. This could be very vehicle specific.
From what I have researched I think it all turns on whether the 'unladen weight' is above 2040kg. The problem is that my V5 uses the term 'mass in service'. Are the two terms the same?
 

redlab

Well-Known Member
The following is from the national police site:

'Most double cab pick ups would fall into the class of dual purpose vehicle (examples of a double cab pick up are vehicles such as Mitsubishi Warrior and a Ford Ranger). A dual purpose vehicle is;
◾constructed/adapted for carriage of both passengers and goods
◾a vehicle with an unladen weight not exceeding 2040 kgs
◾constructed/adapted that the driving power of the engine can be transmitted to all wheels
◾must have rigid roof, transverse passenger seats and rear windows amongst other things.

The national speed limits applicable to dual purpose vehicles (when not drawing a trailer) are the same as those for a car:
◾motorway 70mph
◾dual carriageway 70mph
◾single carriageway 60mph
◾built up area 30mph'

But my Navara twin cab has a 'mass in service' of 2160kg according to the V5 which is above 2040kg and is therefore a LGV and not a dual purpose vehicle. So restricted to 50, 60 and 70 as opposed to 60, 70 and 70. The V5 states it is a LGV.

Am I correct please?

David
works vehicle or private as speed limit depends upon that answer
 

FGYT

Well-Known Member
My Isuzu Dual cab Utah is taxed as a LGV has a Kerb weight (unladen) of 1978kg and as it has 4WD its a Dual purpose vehicle and can do the full speed limit

some pick ups may be heavier so not qualify on weight grounds


Still not acceptable at the Local tip as they classify it as a Commercial vehicle requiring a pass to use tho i can tow in my sub 6ft trailer fully loaded block every body while I use the tip as long as nothing comes out of the pick up ;)

even tho its not even insured to commute to work let alone business use
but will let in Vans that have second row of seats in the back with windows
 

FGYT

Well-Known Member
The following is from the national police site:

'Most double cab pick ups would fall into the class of dual purpose vehicle (examples of a double cab pick up are vehicles such as Mitsubishi Warrior and a Ford Ranger). A dual purpose vehicle is;
◾constructed/adapted for carriage of both passengers and goods
◾a vehicle with an unladen weight not exceeding 2040 kgs
◾constructed/adapted that the driving power of the engine can be transmitted to all wheels
◾must have rigid roof, transverse passenger seats and rear windows amongst other things.

The national speed limits applicable to dual purpose vehicles (when not drawing a trailer) are the same as those for a car:
◾motorway 70mph
◾dual carriageway 70mph
◾single carriageway 60mph
◾built up area 30mph'

But my Navara twin cab has a 'mass in service' of 2160kg according to the V5 which is above 2040kg and is therefore a LGV and not a dual purpose vehicle. So restricted to 50, 60 and 70 as opposed to 60, 70 and 70. The V5 states it is a LGV.

Am I correct please?

David

Kerb weight is under 2000kg for all the Double cabs i can find on the Navara website I dont know what your model is but you should be able to find out

unladen weight is lighter as No fuel is counted



https://www.nissan-cdn.net/content/dam/Nissan/gb/brochures/Nissan_NP300_Navara_UK.pdf
 
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countrryboy

Well-Known Member
Are caddy's not car based/derived vans?
If its a car derived speed limit is still the upper 1, not sure wot the caddy is derived from but the skoda copy is from the felica.

Also pretty sure wether it is a work motor or private is irrelevant as far as speed limits/laws are concerned, companies may have there own speeding policy or restrictors in place thou.

There won't be many pick up's or even land rovers under the 2T wieght limit.

I have read this rule before and always thought it could be dodgy with some motors.
 

Orion

Well-Known Member
From what I have researched I think it all turns on whether the 'unladen weight' is above 2040kg. The problem is that my V5 uses the term 'mass in service'. Are the two terms the same?
You are correct in thinking that unladen weight and mass in service are different. The MIS (it's an EU standard) includes an allowance of 75kg for driver and tools plus extra allowance of 90% of the fuel capacity - generally about 150kg all up depending on the size of your tank. All manufacturers of dual cab pickups on the UK market will ensure their vehicles comply with the unladen weight restriction, it would be marketing suicide otherwise.
 
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Orion

Well-Known Member
works vehicle or private as speed limit depends upon that answer
No, it depends on the taxation class of the vehicle - most, if not all, double cab pickups will be LGV and provided they achieve the weight limitation, as a dual-purpose vehicle can be driven at the national speed limit(s). Car derived vans such as the Caddy etc. if taxed as an LGV have the lower speed limit applied - if registered as a car derived van by the dealership, then the higher national limit apples - go figure! VW nearly dropped a clanger when they introduced the Amarok into the Uk in 2011 as they used the same weight specification as the rest of the world markets not realising that it would result in a lower applicable speed limit. As if by magic the spec changed overnight and the same national speed limits that other double cabs work to now apply!
 
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FGYT

Well-Known Member
Are caddy's not car based/derived vans?
If its a car derived speed limit is still the upper 1, not sure wot the caddy is derived from but the skoda copy is from the felica.

Also pretty sure wether it is a work motor or private is irrelevant as far as speed limits/laws are concerned, companies may have there own speeding policy or restrictors in place thou.

There won't be many pick up's or even land rovers under the 2T wieght limit.

I have read this rule before and always thought it could be dodgy with some motors.

most all 90 and 110 landrovers are well under 2T even on Kerb weight and as they are all 4WD that comply with Dual vehicle
 

Markfox

Well-Known Member
I've always drove my Toyota at 60 on the motorway rather than 70 as I was told its due to the class

to be honest I'm not fussed and never in s rush so 60 is fine , and with roadworks etc most stretches of motorway you can only do 50
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
most all 90 and 110 landrovers are well under 2T even on Kerb weight and as they are all 4WD that comply with Dual vehicle
I'm surprised by that (althou never been a lR owner)
Last time i had an old navara and empty trailer over the wiegh bridge sure it was 2.8T, my navara and trailer was heavier empty than my dads jimny with 1T in the trailer.
 

I. Farticus

Well-Known Member
Given my Hilux Dual Cab meets all the below criteria on https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/car-derived-vans-and-dual-purpose-vehicles/car-derived-vans-and-dual-purpose-vehicles, I'm able to at car speed limits... until I have anything in the load bed that tips me over the weight restriction, or am pulling a trailer.

Dual purpose vehiclesA dual purpose vehicle is a vehicle constructed or adapted for the carriage both of passengers and of goods and designed to weigh no more than 2,040 kg when unladen, and is either:

  • constructed or adapted so that the driving power of the engine is, or can be selected to be, transmitted to all wheels of the vehicle
or

  • permanently fitted with a rigid roof, at least one row of transverse passenger seats to the rear of the driver’s seat and will have side and rear windows - there must also be a minimum ratio between the size of passenger and stowage areas

Clear as mud, and it might just be easier to stick to 60 on motorways to be safe - and drag the MPG up a bit!
 

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