The Riflemans 'Rifle'

Coolhand

Well-Known Member
I had been searching for a 9.3 x 62, something classic to replace the Husky 9.3 I sold about 20 years ago. I even put the feelers out for an 8 x 68S.
Then out of the blue a dealer friend informed me that he had recently taken a consignment rifle which I might be interested in.
A pre 64 Mod 70 chambered in .300 H & H, I had a viewing last night. There on my friends dining room table was a classic American rifle, which has been described as the 'Rifleman's Rifle.'
Condition is sublime, not a mark or blemish on the bolt face, no tells tale signs of use in the typical areas, bluing is 100%. A set of RCBS dies, that have the year of manufacture stamped on them, the way they used to do it, 1990. I would venture to say without the use of a bore scope, that this rifle has fired very few rounds. The stock is pristine not a mark on it and the checkering is sharp. It has a vintage 2-7 Leupold in some very unusual QD rings which I cannot identify but are beautifully made. Original front and rear sights are intact. Everything one could wish for, controlled round feed, 3 POS wing safety, Mauser extractor and the trigger is not bad but could use a tickle up.
Needless to say I bought it. Not the 9.3 or 8 x 68 I craved but a classic rifle,chambered in a classic cartridge which appears to have fallen out of favour, why I don't know. This is only the second pre 64 in .300 H & H I have seen in the last 30 years. If memory serves since its inception, from 1936 to 1963 only approx 37,000 rifles were chambered in .300 H & H. Where are they all ?
There was also 60 un-primed old white box Winchester Western Cases, perhaps some of the older forum members will remember them or perhaps still have some. Some new projectiles are needed, 220 Hornady RN's and some Nosler 200 gr Partitions, I think.

regards
Mike.
 

takbok

Well-Known Member
Sounds like a lovely rifle. Time to make up for all those years of it sitting in a cupboard now!

Enjoy.
 

mereside

Well-Known Member
You can't go posting all that and having us drooling and foaming at the mouth where's the bloody pictures:D
 

Loki

Well-Known Member
Hi Mike

You really shouldnt do this to us on the Forum........not good at all............
The written word is fine but where are the photos - the eyes crave more, please?

F
 

Coolhand

Well-Known Member
Sorry Gents , Forgot I had this one pic on my phone ! Better ones to follow when I pick up the rifle.

regards
Mike.Mod 70.jpeg
 
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Hales Smut

Well-Known Member
Nice rifle in a super classic calibre. I do like it a lot.
The M70 with claw controlled round feed is a masterpiece of classic rifle design. Very popular in the US and Africa. Much less in Europe. Tastes are very different from country to country.
In the UK both Sako and Tikka are very popular. In Belgium just 2 hours from the UK, they are not popular at all and regarded as low quality rifles. Shooters have much more conficence in Blaser, Steyer, Sauer, ....

Wouldn't mind having a nice M70 in 30-06.
 

enfieldspares

Well-Known Member
It's queer that, HS. French guns don't "go" here in UK. Faure le Page, Gastinne Rennette, Grainger even, nor Manufrance. I couldn't give my Manufrance, easy-opening 16 bore s/b/s Model 28E boxlock ejector away.

How do French guns "go" in Belgium? Is there a Walloon vs Flanders price difference even? I saw some nice stuff at the King's gun shop in Brussels...but it was almost a pastiche on a Boss, Holland or Purdey.
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
Nice rig ! I recently refinished a spare stock for Conquest 1 . It was the twin to yours . Maybe he'll post some pics ?

I say was because he's flogged it already . The man has no soul , just kidding Rick , you have a soul , it's just black and cold and is incapable of keeping nice rifles for long ............. sorry , that was me I was thinking of lol .

AB
 
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Coolhand

Well-Known Member
Nice rig ! I recently refinished a spare stock for Conquest 1 . It was the twin to yours . Maybe he'll post some pics ?

I say was because he's flogged it already . The man has no soul , just kidding Rick lol .

AB
Alberta Boy , my younger brother is an electrician with the Calgary Counsel , I am due for a holiday, so perhaps I'll bring the .300 H & H with me and we can go chase those nice Alberta Muleys ! And then hit the Bow down around Carseland , caught some big browns down there !

Mike.
 

Coolhand

Well-Known Member
Hales , I have never understood the cultural bias towards various goods much less firearms, if it's good, it's good does not matter who made it. The Pre 64 Mod 70 was and still is a work mans tool, hence the term Riflemans Rifle. I would suggest that the pre & post 64 Mod 70 and the Sako L61R fit that description as well as any commercial Mauser, Shultz & Larsen, Carl Gustav , etc etc. I have at one time or another owned them all and don't have a stand out favourite.
The thing that impresses me is that all these classics were made to a standard and not to a price and for the most part were mass produced. I stumbled on an ad last night on a gun shop web site for a new CZ in .300 H & H which was $500 more than what I paid for the pre 64, which one would I rather have? I am often amused by the dialogue between younger shooters I know. They are enraptured by the modern 'plastic guns ' and that is not a reproach as they have nothing to compare them with. There was a time here, and I am sure the U.K. was exactly the same, when one could walk into a gun shop and take ones pick of, Sako L61R , L579 , L461, REM BDL & ADL, BRNO's ( the early ones before the Ruskies took over ) any amount of commercial Mausers, those fabulous Shultz & Larsens, Carl Gustavs, Winchesters, M55 Tikkas.
I could go on but I think it would become boring ! It occurred to me whilst typing this that I miss my youth, not because I was young, because of all the gun related things that I took for granted and now crave again. I have just learned that my mate that sold me the pre 64 has two guns he wants me to see. A Holland Royal in .375 Flanged & a Rigby Hammerless Underlever and the hits just keep on coming !!

regards
Mike.
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
Alberta Boy , my younger brother is an electrician with the Calgary Counsel , I am due for a holiday, so perhaps I'll bring the .300 H & H with me and we can go chase those nice Alberta Muleys ! And then hit the Bow down around Carseland , caught some big browns down there !

Mike.
I'm in , I know a few good spots on the Bow and I have some friends with very large parcels of land down around Longview . There are Muleys there that will blow your mind . Let me know when you up this way .
I'll be down your way about March , I'll buy you a drink and we can swap filthy lies about hunting lol .

AB
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
Hales , I have never understood the cultural bias towards various goods much less firearms, if it's good, it's good does not matter who made it. The Pre 64 Mod 70 was and still is a work mans tool, hence the term Riflemans Rifle. I would suggest that the pre & post 64 Mod 70 and the Sako L61R fit that description as well as any commercial Mauser, Shultz & Larsen, Carl Gustav , etc etc. I have at one time or another owned them all and don't have a stand out favourite.
The thing that impresses me is that all these classics were made to a standard and not to a price and for the most part were mass produced. I stumbled on an ad last night on a gun shop web site for a new CZ in .300 H & H which was $500 more than what I paid for the pre 64, which one would I rather have? I am often amused by the dialogue between younger shooters I know. They are enraptured by the modern 'plastic guns ' and that is not a reproach as they have nothing to compare them with. There was a time here, and I am sure the U.K. was exactly the same, when one could walk into a gun shop and take ones pick of, Sako L61R , L579 , L461, REM BDL & ADL, BRNO's ( the early ones before the Ruskies took over ) any amount of commercial Mausers, those fabulous Shultz & Larsens, Carl Gustavs, Winchesters, M55 Tikkas.
I could go on but I think it would become boring ! It occurred to me whilst typing this that I miss my youth, not because I was young, because of all the gun related things that I took for granted and now crave again. I have just learned that my mate that sold me the pre 64 has two guns he wants me to see. A Holland Royal in .375 Flanged & a Rigby Hammerless Underlever and the hits just keep on coming !!

regards
Mike.
You make an important point . These rifles weren't factory custom . They were built and priced for the average working person , but they were built to a standard not seen in todays factory rifles of comparable price points . I think that's true of firearms built on both sides of the pond .

AB
 

sharkey

Well-Known Member
I think a lot of those 300H&H were given the wby treatment. Not for increased performance, just ease of reloading & case life. Lovely rifle & if it was mine I'd seriously think about a rechamber if I was going to use it a lot.
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
I think a lot of those 300H&H were given the wby treatment. Not for increased performance, just ease of reloading & case life. Lovely rifle & if it was mine I'd seriously think about a rechamber if I was going to use it a lot.
Blasphemy !
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
Great catch!

It is funny, that earlier on Monday, I had stopped by to chat with a friend, a former long range competitor and bench rest world record holder. He was saying how he would like to find or build one rifle he doesn't have, a Model 70 in .300 H&H. I had passed one up about five years ago and regret it.

What really made the world take notice was when the rifle Model 70 came out with the .300 H&H in 1937, a shooter bought one off the rack, the hunting model, and some Silvertip 180-gr ammunition, and won a 1,000 yard match against some of the world's best shooters with their match Springfields in .30-06. Everybody wanted a .300 H&H in heavy barrel target model then. And it won a bunch of matches with 175-gr and 200-gr Matchking bullets. With today's great 178-gr and 180-gr match bullets, it has a new lease on life.

Cabela's has a special edition Ruger No. 1 for their 50th birthday.
http://www.cabelas.com/product/Ruger-reg-No-H-H-Cabelas-th-Anniversary-Rifle/1172286.uts
 
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SDC7x57

Well-Known Member
That Cabela's Ruger looks nice! They're also doing one (non-commemorative) in 7x57 - think I'd like both!
 

Coolhand

Well-Known Member
I think a lot of those 300H&H were given the wby treatment. Not for increased performance, just ease of reloading & case life. Lovely rifle & if it was mine I'd seriously think about a rechamber if I was going to use it a lot.
Sharkey , that would be like taking an E Type Jag and putting a Mazda donk in it. I will stick to my modern custom builds for the culling work and carry the .300 when its Deer and Pig time.

regards
Mike.
 

Coolhand

Well-Known Member
Great catch!

It is funny, that earlier on Monday, I had stopped by to chat with a friend, a former long range competitor and bench rest world record holder. He was saying how he would like to find or build one rifle he doesn't have, a Model 70 in .300 H&H. I had passed one up about five years ago and regret it.

What really made the world take notice was when the rifle Model 70 came out with the .300 H&H in 1937, a shooter bought one off the rack, the hunting model, and some Silvertip 180-gr ammunition, and won a 1,000 yard match against some of the world's best shooters with their match Springfields in .30-06. Everybody wanted a .300 H&H in heavy barrel target model then. And it won a bunch of matches with 175-gr and 200-gr Matchking bullets. With today's great 178-gr and 180-gr match bullets, it has a new lease on life.

Cabela's has a special edition Ruger No. 1 for their 50th birthday.
http://www.cabelas.com/product/Ruger-reg-No-H-H-Cabelas-th-Anniversary-Rifle/1172286.uts
It must be a generational thing Southern, I had a similar conversation with a young bloke new to shooting, bought himself a .300 Win Mag and loves it. He tells me all about the its virtues and wonders why I bothered to buy an 'old obsolete cartridge. ' The arrogance, or perhaps the ignorance of youth, he was a little dismayed when he learned that the .300 Win came into being in 1963 & the .300 Super Thirty 1925 and I then told him about Ben Comfort, the Man that won the Wimbledon Cup in 1935 and again won the International 1000 yard match in 1937 using a .300 H&H. This young bloke gets the delirium tremens, like to have a conniption,when I tell him how much powder, primers and projectiles used to cost !

regards
Mike.
 

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