Who knows their Boar?

timbrayford

Well-Known Member
Many years ago I used to farm free range Tamworth pigs, looking at the markings and shape of these they look like wild boar domestic crossbreds
 

Dan Gliballs

Well-Known Member
Many years ago I used to farm free range Tamworth pigs, looking at the markings and shape of these they look like wild boar domestic crossbreds
Apparently these arent crosses, a nearby Estate tried to introduce Iron Age Pigs, they escaped about 5 or 6 years ago and have been living wild ever since, its a LONG way to the nearest domestic pig.
 

timbrayford

Well-Known Member
Apparently these arent crosses, a nearby Estate tried to introduce Iron Age Pigs, they escaped about 5 or 6 years ago and have been living wild ever since, its a LONG way to the nearest domestic pig.
Funny you should say that. When they wanted "Iron Age " pigs for the Butser Hill project in Petersfield, Hampshire in the 1970's they crossed Tamworths with wild boar.
The first generation crosses gave basically a wild boar colouring with slightly less hair and a modified body shape. My Tamworth boar crossed with a saddlebackXLarge white used to give white pigs with dark blotches similar to your pictures.
 
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trev

Well-Known Member
Evening Dan,
A nice group of pigs, just coming up to their second year i think. No sign of mum, which makes me think she has just kicked them out to make way for some new piglets.
If you don't have a realy hard winter, you could have a lot of piglets come the spring.
Great to watch, thanks for the clip.
trev.
 

Dan Gliballs

Well-Known Member
We have been filming this group in 2 different location, from what we can see there is 5 in the group, the locations are around 500yrds apart.

In the first clip there is a larger animal comes in to the shot and pushes the other 2 away, could this be the dominant sow?

There is possibly another 2 groups of similar numbers on the estate.

Its looking like some sport should be had soon

I have about 170 clips on the card, its great watching them.
 
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trev

Well-Known Member
No i would stick with my first guess, looks like you have a young family group. The animal that pushes the others out of the way, looks like a young boar.
 

Dan Gliballs

Well-Known Member
No i would stick with my first guess, looks like you have a young family group. The animal that pushes the others out of the way, looks like a young boar.
Cool, that means I can shoot any one of them. :D

NV looks like the only way, they are proper jump jacks, even the IR coming on has them spooked.
 

mudman

Well-Known Member
try and get hold of a couple of wild boar sows and let them, err....ahem, 'escape', they will soon be breeding true to type within a couple of generations I would guess. A bit of selective culling would speed up the process.
 

Dan Gliballs

Well-Known Member
try and get hold of a couple of wild boar sows and let them, err....ahem, 'escape', they will soon be breeding true to type within a couple of generations I would guess. A bit of selective culling would speed up the process.
Im not fussed about the genetics, I just want something different to put in the freezer!!
 

Buchan

Well-Known Member
Interesting comments on the pictures. I do an annual inspection of some wild boar and the farmer regularly crosses the boar with different breeds. The idea being to get some flavour, but a bigger carcass. The wild boar piglets are usually striped until older, the spotted ones are those with some rare breed blood. They could just be genetic throwbacks.
 

yorksjt

Well-Known Member
Have you any idea where they originate from? If there are pure boar the area it seems a shame to dilute the breed.
 

SussexFallow

Well-Known Member
got a few down here but never seen a spotty one yet! as long as they taste good surely thats all that matters
atb steve
 

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