Youngsters (8) First Knife (rabbits/pigeons)

tjm160

Well-Known Member
Can anyone recommend a particularly good knife for a youngsters (boy aged 8) first knife, suitable for gutting rabbits and de-breasting pigeons?

Thanks in advance for any assistance :tiphat:
 

A J

Well-Known Member
If you're happy for him to have a fixed blade knife, then you really couldn't go wrong with a Mora Clipper. It's a good blade that's easy to maintain and cheap enough to replace should he lose it (not that I ever lost a knife at that age).

Mora Companion MG carbon, green | knivesandtools.co.uk

If you'd rather him have a folder then a simple SAK would my call. I started my girls off with Victorinox SAKs.
 
Last edited:

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member

tjm160

Well-Known Member
Thanks gents and I'm not quite sure which, but your comments have already been very helpful.

He has wanted a penknife for a while. The twin boys three years older than him directly across the street had penknives for their 9th birthday. The last thing I want him drawn into is (albeit natural), is either keeping up with the Jones' or one-upmanship.

I am therefore thinking that thanks to you chaps, I am leaning towards fixed blade. Such, just like my own stalking knife, only comes out (just like the .410 he will soon have), when we actually go out together and so therefore for strict specific purpose only. That then also remains consistent with the safety, responsibility and accountability I'm seeking to ensure is paramount, as his journey continues to the next level.

Whilst I agree the Mora is an excellent low cost and great utility knife, I'm not sure it's not just a little too large for his small hands and the job of gutting rabbits and de-breasting pigeons.

Thanks for all the suggestions though, I'll take a look through the links suggested.
 

tjm160

Well-Known Member
Hmm, thanks again gents, all those links have been most helpful.

We're heading for Cotswold's today, whom I note stock the Opinel Trekking pocket knife.

That looks like a great compromise between the two (thanks Mike!).

I've just got to make very sure he doesn't take it everywhere (willie_gun), we live on an estate :)

As the youngest lad in the street, he does have a tendency to try and keep up with and impress the older kids. Hence my very strict control, more than would perhaps be necessary for a true 'country lad'.

Although I am as discrete as possible with only the opposite of the double garage doors open and the car in front of that, it doesn't take long for the local lads (and even some lasses) to come and see what's going on when a deer is hanging up and being dealt with. It is a little disconcerting, but equally an opportunity to do my bit to help them understand that meat doesn't start off shrink wrapped on the shelf at Tesco's. The parents are at least largely supportive and I've not had any complaints, but equally have to be careful.
 

Orion

Well-Known Member
On the recommendation of another SD member, (thanks whoever you were!), I bought a small Buck Bantam folder to replace my beat up Opinel pocket knife. I suspect it would suit your Nimrod perfectly. A good price - and even better when Go Outdoors do their 10% off vouchers. It will also go through the dishwasher unlike an Opinel.

http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/buck-284-bantam-knife-small-p294269
 

tjm160

Well-Known Member
Hmm, thanks Orion, that does indeed look good and less likely to be affected by 'liquid' given the well shaped handle.
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
Tim

If you're concerned about the size of a fixed blade then it might be worth hunting down a "Bird N' Trout" style knife. Designed specifically for working with small game they are much better suited to small hands.

Heinnie's only seem to have this one: Cold Steel Bird and Trout | Heinnie Haynes

After that it starts to get a bit pricey: Buck 538 Open Season Small Game Knife 0538BKS-B, black | knivesandtools.co.uk

Unless buying from the US is an option: Amazon.com : Buck Knives 0538BKS Open Season Small Game Knife : Sports Outdoors

Edit: You might also consider a smaller puukko style knife? Although a bit pricey this looks nice: Karesuando Hare Knife - Casstrom UK
 
Last edited:

Cyres

Well-Known Member
Suggest you look at a bench made mini griptillion. Fantastic folder and will last a life time. I gave one to my no 3 son at a similar age. However buy a first aid kit as a cut will almost certain, frigteningly sharp when new.

D
 

Pine Marten

Well-Known Member
Well it's as sharp as you make it, so you could definitely do those things, plus you learn how to safely use a folding knife without stabbing yourself or anyone else. But personally, I'd just go for a Swiss Army Knife.
 

willie_gunn

Well-Known Member
Suggest you look at a bench made mini griptillion. Fantastic folder and will last a life time. I gave one to my no 3 son at a similar age. However buy a first aid kit as a cut will almost certain, frigteningly sharp when new.

D

If we're opening the search up that wide then also look at Spyderco, perhaps a Delica or Endura? Personally I prefer them to Benchmade knives, but there's really nothing to choose between them that isn't down to personal subjective opinion.

Then there's Enzo, Boker, SAK, Fallkniven, Puma.....suddenly the list becomes endless ;)
 

Hereford

Well-Known Member
My lads have a Morakniv craft line top q fixed blade (whittling, gutting etc) - cheap, cheerful, good scabbard, easy to clean and a blade length that won't get you sent to prison[FONT=Calibri, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif][/FONT]:eek:
 

old man

Well-Known Member
Tim

for a youngster I'd be inclined to suggest a UK legal folder as a first knife. He will doubtless be thrilled skinny with his first knife and will want to take it everywhere.

You beat me to it WG. :tiphat:

The Opinel, good steel but design yet to be tested in court?
 
Last edited:

hybridfiat

Well-Known Member
I second the Opinel. It is light very good for what it is designed and does not look or feel like and offensive weapon.
Since you are in the UK this is a major factor.
The police are very unlikely to turn a blind eye to a thick, heavy, drop point bowie style blade; but a thin light and technically simple 'French farmers' knife they may just pass.
I have carried an Opinel for 25 years and it is by far and away the most practical all rounder I've owned.
20160107_193427.jpg
This is the style I prefer, it sits in the hand better. I lost my SS 'gardening' Opinel with its plain blade but you get the idea.
 

Gaothead

Well-Known Member
I gave a Moray Clipper style knife to an 8yr old for Christmas, only for use under my supervision. A swiss army knife serves for general use - they borrow mine for opening presents and boxes and I use the tooth pick a lot.
 

Top