Africa advice please

twoseventy

Well-Known Member
Good morning all,

I've been invited to go hunting in South Africa, but I've had no experience of the hunting scene abroad before and wondered if i could draw from the wealth of experience on this forum?

The invitation has offered various hunting packages, each with varying numbers and species. I've never really been interested in trophy hunting, but i do enjoy a challenge. Certainly not interested in any big dangerous game, but i am looking for suggestions of species to book for that will present a challenge and also entertainment. It seems like a waste to go all that way just to shoot fish in a bucket so to speak!.

So those that have been, which species have been the most memorable for you? and which ones are likely to come back and have a go if you get it wrong?

Nathan
 

CarlW

Well-Known Member
Bushbuck and wildebeest will both have a go if you cock it up. As will sable in the right circumstances. Following up wounded pigs is no fun either. However, I am sure you will shoot them all beautifully and not need to worry about that.
 

AdrianC

Well-Known Member
Hunting in Africa is something that will make want to return.
For a first time hunt I would recommend animals that make you think of Africa.

Of course if your invitation is bound to a package then you might not get the choice of species and you don't mention how many animals are included but for a first hunt I would go for a warthog, a springbok, a zebra, an impala, Hartebeest, wildebeest or possibly look for a gemsbok and of course the kudu is one of those animals that most hunters dream about.

Walking and stalking is the only way to hunt properly in my opinion. I have only sat in a hide a few times to shoot bait animals but the thrill of being on foot and hunting is hard to beat in Africa.

Each animal I have hunted will always be a special memory but a few stand out.
My first African animal was a 52" kudu so will always be special, I took a wonderful old hartebeest on a dusty plain as dusk was falling and the sky was a purple pink colour which was amazing.
My first springbok was memorable after a lot of disappointment, my last springbok was also a great memory because it was the biggest I've ever seen.
I've shot a Hartmann's zebra after an amazing hunt in the mountains and a Burchell's after a lot of hard work and effort.
My last kudu was a 56" inch monster that came after a series of mishaps but was an awesome experience.

There are still memories of all the others, remembering the hunt, getting into position and the waiting for a shot to present itself.

The misses, the failed stalks, the experiences of being in the bush and the amazing animals I've been fortunate to see, hunt and photograph all make up those unforgettable moments and memories.
It's not just the mammals, the insects, the birds, the reptiles should all be noticed too.

The smells, the dust, the thorns, the hot sun and how good water tastes when it's warm after a long stalk.

Take time to soak up the feeling of walking up to your first animal and your last, admire it and your surroundings.

Just go and have an experience and adventure you will never forget.

I went for the first time in 2015 on a once in a lifetime trip.

I've been back every year since and am looking forward to my fifth trip later this year.
 
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3xspringer

Well-Known Member
Nathan, come up to Kingsclere and have a chat with myself and some friends there’s a group of us that have been a few times and hopefully going to return something you will never forget. Pm me.
 

zambezi

Well-Known Member
It's not just the mammals, the insects, the birds, the reptiles should all be noticed too.

The smells, the dust, the thorns, the hot sun and how good water tastes when it's warm after a long stalk.

Take time to soak up the feeling of walking up to your first animal and your last, admire it and your surroundings.

Just go and have an experience and adventure you will never forget.
Amen to that! Africa gets in your nostrils and under your skin in a way that other parts of the world do not. Take time to savour that, to store it up in memory. It is a wonderful reverie until you return.
 

artschool

Well-Known Member
The misses, the failed stalks, the experiences of being in the bush and the amazing animals I've been fortunate to see, hunt and photograph all make up those unforgettable moments and memories.
It's not just the mammals, the insects, the birds, the reptiles should all be noticed too.

The smells, the dust, the thorns, the hot sun and how good water tastes when it's warm after a long stalk.

Take time to soak up the feeling of walking up to your first animal and your last, admire it and your surroundings.

Just go and have an experience and adventure you will never forget.
I would love to say what a load of codswallop just to give a different option............

however its all true. I have booked my 4th trip over this coming march and am really looking forward to it.
 

tusker

Well-Known Member
My Eland stalk in Namibia last year was truly epic 2 days and then only getting the shot at last knocking s.
A very large but elusive quarry and more satisfying than than a bakky full of Springbok.
Go.enjoy. Tusker
 

Sika98k

Well-Known Member
in Kenya I was in Tsavo east and saw my first warthog. The disease set in ! The next year saw myself and 3 friends on a warthog management hunt in Hochfeld, Namibia. We had a very enjoyable week and the farmers were delighted.
I’ve been back to Namibia 3 times since on management hunts and have enjoyed every one of them.
Tusker and myself have discussed where we have both gone separately, both very similar. Now that he has gone and got a Rigby 275 also we should do a “Rigby 275” hunt together.
Africa gets under your skin but you won’t regret it. It has something to offer for all of us.
Oryx,hartebeest,zebra and wildebeest are well priced management animals where I go. Indeed the trophy fees are very reasonable also.
 

Hanechdene

Well-Known Member
Be careful going hunting in Africa, it gets under your skin as others have said....

Most things in Africa may want to return the favour if you get it wrong. Just practice a lot with your rifle before you go. Safari Press sell “Perfect Shot Plains Game Targets” Within their poster section.

There are so many enjoyable hunting memories but the standouts would be Bushbuck, Eland and Kudu for me as well as my first Buff.

Counting the days till me 7th trip!
 

Nkawu

Well-Known Member
A blue wildebeest is a very big tough animal and makes for a challenging but enjoyable hunt. Hunting impala on foot in bushveld type terrain can also be quite a challenge due to the incredible eye sight and amount of lookouts in a typical herd. Pop over to AfricaHunting.com for an incredible wealth of information from guys in similar situations to yourself.
 

Safari Hunter

Well-Known Member
Warthogs are a must hunt, great fun. Other than that Kudu, Bushbuck, Impala, Springbuck and Wildebeest all good for your first time out and cost effective.
As others have said you will be going back again even if you think this is a one off!!
 

starr shot

Well-Known Member
I’ve been several times now and every stalk and animal shot were all memorable,even the times when we blanked.First warning though will be once you’ve been you will want to go back year on year.
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
Been a number of times and shot most of the plains game and some dangerous game. For a challenge try hunting a Bushbuck, they can be quite a challenge and very feisty if wounded. Nyala in thick bush are also a challenge.
Either way enjoy the whole experience, I have no doubt you will want to go back again.
 

Lateral

Well-Known Member
Find out as much as you can about the people offering the hunting. Is it mainly shooting from the back of a truck, or actually involve stalking.

Is it organised in such a way that the hunting is really "hunting", or so contrived that they drive you directly to the species you want to shoot, and then the animals are so tame, they stand there asking to be shot !

I went in 2017, and found it very disappointing. The whole setup was designed to get you to shoot as much as possible, as quickly as possible. They even used men on horses to drive herds of animals towards us.

We did "stalk" into a group of Blue Wildbeest, got within about 30yds, with them watching us the whole time. It was more like walking up to a herd of cows. And when we did get close, the PH said they had the wrong colour tags on them, so we couldn't shoot anyway :doh: In fact, most of the animals were happy for you to get way closer than was natural.

It destroyed all of my expectations, and the experience for me. I guess I'll go again at some point, but I'll be doing a lot more checking before I do.

The best animal you will shoot, will be the one you have to work the hardest to get.
 

zambezi

Well-Known Member
My second trip is now booked! PG+DG combo. Woohoo. On countdown now. Sooooo excited. Trip is booked with Patrick Reynecke who advertises on these pages. His references are excellent, the concessions he uses are huge and their location [Hoedspruit] are on the western edge of the Kruger-Trans-Frontier park. Ideal.

Patrick declares all animals are wild and not maintained by man's intervention. Sole exception to that is some of the [breeding stock] buffalo bulls are given supplementary feeding when required. But the cows are not tended and are often regional transients although some are resident. And it is a cow that I have opted to hunt. There are two older cows ranging in the Hoedspruit area that have been identified for culling.

If as we stalk into the herd they start walking towards us or show no wariness as we approach, I will not be pulling the trigger. It must be fair chase into herds that are not habituated to human presence or not at all. Patrick assures me it will be true hunting. I will post pics on my return at end of March...
 

Lateral

Well-Known Member
My second trip is now booked! PG+DG combo. Woohoo. On countdown now. Sooooo excited. Trip is booked with Patrick Reynecke who advertises on these pages. His references are excellent, the concessions he uses are huge and their location [Hoedspruit] are on the western edge of the Kruger-Trans-Frontier park. Ideal.

Patrick declares all animals are wild and not maintained by man's intervention. Sole exception to that is some of the [breeding stock] buffalo bulls are given supplementary feeding when required. But the cows are not tended and are often regional transients although some are resident. And it is a cow that I have opted to hunt. There are two older cows ranging in the Hoedspruit area that have been identified for culling.

If as we stalk into the herd they start walking towards us or show no wariness as we approach, I will not be pulling the trigger. It must be fair chase into herds that are not habituated to human presence or not at all. Patrick assures me it will be true hunting. I will post pics on my return at end of March...

Sounds great. I look forward to the report, and pictures.
 

AdrianC

Well-Known Member
Find out as much as you can about the people offering the hunting. Is it mainly shooting from the back of a truck, or actually involve stalking.

Is it organised in such a way that the hunting is really "hunting", or so contrived that they drive you directly to the species you want to shoot, and then the animals are so tame, they stand there asking to be shot !

I went in 2017, and found it very disappointing. The whole setup was designed to get you to shoot as much as possible, as quickly as possible. They even used men on horses to drive herds of animals towards us.

We did "stalk" into a group of Blue Wildbeest, got within about 30yds, with them watching us the whole time. It was more like walking up to a herd of cows. And when we did get close, the PH said they had the wrong colour tags on them, so we couldn't shoot anyway :doh: In fact, most of the animals were happy for you to get way closer than was natural.

It destroyed all of my expectations, and the experience for me. I guess I'll go again at some point, but I'll be doing a lot more checking before I do.

The best animal you will shoot, will be the one you have to work the hardest to get.
Sounds like you got stitched up.
With everything due diligence is required. Plenty of research and questions need to be asked before committing any funds.

I would suggest this is the exception rather than the norm and not widely practiced.
There are hundreds of respectable and trustworthy outfitters in Africa who offer good hunting.

I hope you return one day and get the hunting experience you want.
 

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