Best torque screwdriver

nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
What are people's recommendations for the best torque screwdriver?

Wheeler Fat wrench is an obvious choice but for similar money there is the new digital Wheeler wrench which has a larger range of torque settings. Also the Vortex is similar money if a little more but with a smaller range but has the Vortex warranty.

I know there are plenty of torque screwdrivers intended for bikes which are cheaper but these usually dont go down low enough for scope rings which are often below 10inch/lbs. If anyone knows of one that does have the range of 10-70 inch/lbs then put a link up too please.
 

The Singing Stalker

Well-Known Member
Do you want the best of the best? not cheap but the best? Then Norbar. But you are unlikely to need that. I would go sealey or draper expert. I know one of them goes to the required settings as I was looking a few months ago.
Of course you should check calibration every year. To be sure to be sure.
 

nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
The Sealey STS104 goes from 0-100nm so more than enough for every rifle application. Any idea how much recalibration would be?
 

paul o'

Well-Known Member
No problems had mine on the test bench at work when I got it a few years ago and have tested it along side my pals that is RR tested for aircraft use and it was as good as it was ,just remember never leave it set but leave it at rest to keep it in good working order ..

Just seen the above RS components will sort out your Equipment if needed Services | RS Components
 
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9.3x64

Well-Known Member
Norbar are the best I have seen. Yes a bit of overkill and expensive, but an utter joy to use.
This is their shooters kit.
 

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9.3x64

Well-Known Member
Tool porn!

Yeah it's a bit like that.
I was first told about Norbar torque drivers by an old boy working on a spitfire at a museum while visiting my wife's parents near Foxton Cambridgeshire.
It was fascinating talking to him about how the company started and how they designed a specific way to torque some parts on the spitfire engine. I can't remember all the details. If someone does know the story please share???
I think it was Duxford museum or something similar.
I was like a kid in a lolly shop that day.
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
According to the Sportsmatch site http://www.sportsmatch-uk.com/faq-s#faqnoanchor 4mm ring screws should be tightened to 30 in/lbs and 4mm dovetail clamp screws at 42 in/lbs with 5mm dovetail clamp screws to 66 in/lbs With Picatinny / Weaver rail clamps at 40 in/lbs

I am not sure if you are fixed on the screwdriver form but I bought this 1/4" drive torque wrench which claims 2-14nm. (18-125 in/lbs) for another purpose, but it worked fine doing the various clamps on a Photo XT.

OCGIG 1/4 inch Drive Bicycle Bike Torque Wrench Reversible Ratchet Socket Set Torque Sleeve 2-14NM: Amazon.co.uk: DIY Tools

The click action is fine and seems to work both left and right hand threads and from 0nm. The little magnifying window through which you read the scale in conjunction with the micrometer scale on the revolving handle section I find a bit crude and confusing...I have a Snap-On 3/8" drive torque wrench which just has the scale engraved on the fixed part of the shaft and is much simpler and clearer.

There are a load of them badged by different wholesalers on Amazon, they vary the torque range, so make sure it is low enough.

2-14NM Bicycle Torque Wrench Sets, Yosmy 1/4 Tools

Alan
 
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nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
A friend has the Wheeler, but it's scale is really poor to set, and read. I have this

https://www.norbar.com/en-gb/produc...-adjustable/category_multid/56/range_multid/9

and I also have the Vortex, both are excellent, but the Vortex tends to get used the most. Very easy to read, and set, compared to the Wheeler. Regardless of which one you use, it's good practice to zero it after use, to take the tension off.

I did think the Vortex looked easy to set up and very clear markings in 1 inch/lb increments. Also with the VIP warranty it's nice to knkw if anything goes wrong it's covered.
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
What torq settings ( ball park ) does action and stock screws get set at? Just wondering so know what range to look for one that does everything so to speak

Paul
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
What torq settings ( ball park ) does action and stock screws get set at? Just wondering so know what range to look for one that does everything so to speak

Paul

Most articles I have found refer to between 30 to 50 in/lbs but will depend on the screw.

However...

Interesting article on the questionable value of torque wrenches to reproduce the same grip/bolt stretch when friction difference between dry and lubricated threads is considered....

Action Screw Torque

Torque wrench for tuning group size article...

http://www.accurateshooter.com/technical-articles/savage-action-screw-torque-tuning/

Alan
 

Beretta shooter

Well-Known Member
I use the sealey STS 104 digital torque driver and find it’s just the job, 0-20nm so I can use it for other applications and not just gun smithing related tasks.
 

Lateral

Well-Known Member
I use the sealey STS 104 digital torque driver and find it’s just the job, 0-20nm so I can use it for other applications and not just gun smithing related tasks.


The only concern I have with tools supposed to work over such a wide range is how accurate they are ? If I need to torque something to circa 3nm (27 inlbs) as near as damn it, I wouldn't want to rely on a tool scaled to 20nm (180 inlbs). Just me.
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
Maybe I’m being rough but if I’m send a torque wrench over a large range and it worked fine..... how many years have I managed by just wrenching up by feel and an Alan key over the years? Probably over tightened stuff but not to any detrimental effect ..... yet!😳

So if using one for all the ranges needed I’d still probably be better than hand wrench

Paul
 

nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
The only concern I have with tools supposed to work over such a wide range is how accurate they are ? If I need to torque something to circa 3nm (27 inlbs) as near as damn it, I wouldn't want to rely on a tool scaled to 20nm (180 inlbs). Just me.

The Sealy STS104 states it's accurate to 1% of the stated capacity so 1.8 inch/lbs?

The action screws on a pillar bedded stock are around 45 inch/lbs possibly more for a chassis system so would only really need up to 50 or 60 so the Vortex covers that but the Sealey as mentioned would cover other applications too.
 

Lateral

Well-Known Member
The Sealy STS104 states it's accurate to 1% of the stated capacity so 1.8 inch/lbs?

The action screws on a pillar bedded stock are around 45 inch/lbs possibly more for a chassis system so would only really need up to 50 or 60 so the Vortex covers that but the Sealey as mentioned would cover other applications too.


Forgive me for being a pessimist, but when tools such as the £140.00 Norbar 5 series quote a certificated +/- 3% accuracy, I'd be interested to see just how accurate the £35.00 Sealy is ?
 
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