Clipping a dog's claws?

FrenchieBoy

Well-Known Member
I take my dog to have his claws clipped about once a month which only costs me a fiver each time and only takes about 2 to 3 minutes to do. I know only too well that lots more road work might well avoid the need for regular trimming but sometimes I am not in a position to do the road work necessary. (I ought to add that Harley is as good as gold about having his claws trimmed)
With this in mind I am thinking about getting my own set of "dog claw clippers" and doing the job myself whenever it is necessary. I have watched numerous videos on Youtube (Some by qualified vets and very detailed) and can see no reason why I should not do so myself. However one thing that is not too clear is which sort of clippers are the best to use i.e. Scissor type or the Guillotine type of clippers.
How many of you trim your dogs claws yourself and which type of clippers would you suggest are the best to use please.
Also do you have any useful hints or tips for clipping dogs claws please?

Thanks in advance for any helpful replies you can offer.:thumb:
 

riddick

Well-Known Member
the guillotine type are in my opinion better they have less of a tendency to crush and split the claw, they also have a gauge or " stop" type of thing which limits the amount that's trimmed, negating the fear of cutting too much and causing bleeding and discomfort for the dog. I'll try and find a picture,
even better than a pic, the exact ones I have and used for well over 40 years. Millers Forge Millers Forge Pet Nail Clippers - Millers Forge from Splendid Pets UK
 

Apthorpe

Well-Known Member
I've used scissor type clippers before and they worked fine. If i'd seen guillotine type, i'd have chosen them.
Pretty obvious....but err on the side of cutting too little, to avoid cutting to the quick
 

riddick

Well-Known Member
just to add it seems in my haste I didn't think about the scissor type being exactly what I have, so to clarify, a type that cuts and supports the claw as opposed to a blade and anvil type, the ones I have, [in the link] provide a cutting from all around the claw and with the added stop in place avoids the cutting too short as refereed to by apthorpe in the above post.
I also give my dogs a treat, tin of sardines usually immediately upon the completion of the trimming session, I believe with all things dog wise, to end on a positive especially by a food reward helps focus their thoughts on the treat rather than fear of the clippers, I have clipped other peoples dogs as well as my own, one of which had to be doped and muzzled before the vet appeared in the room with the clippers, I spent an hour with him and he let me clip all his claws no problem.
 
Last edited:

Pedro

Well-Known Member
My previous dog hated having his paws touched at all and trying to clip his claws was like trying to cut Michael Flatley's toenails mid-dance and the inevitable result one time was that I got quite a bad bleeder, no doubt with some pain. They were cut by professionals after that. But my present dog is as calm as anything, obviously with the long view that he gets a treat once it's finished. Guillotine clippers I find best. And I'd second Apthorpe's observation that it's better to cut less (and more often) and not cut the quick, which is hard to see on many dogs.
 

old keeper

Well-Known Member
As Riddick says. The guard stops cutting the quick. My black lab is a bit of a job as he has black dewclaws, but on other dogs I've had you could see the quick.
 

steve54

Well-Known Member
Me and my wife tackle our dogs claws with the guillotine cutters with the guard. It has to be a two pronged attack, - as "Basil" dances around like he's on hot coals as soon as we start cutting :rolleyes:
My wife distracts Bas' with his favourite treat - primula, while i do the cutting. We have got it down to a fine art now.:thumb:
Good luck Pete.
 
Last edited:

FrenchieBoy

Well-Known Member
Me and my wife tackle our dogs claws with the guillotine cutters with the guard. It has to be a two pronged attack, - as "Basil" dances around like he's on hot coals as soon as we start cutting :rolleyes:
My wife distracts Bas' with his favourite treat - primula, while i do the cutting. We have got it down to a fine art now.:thumb:
Good luck Pete.
I had guessed that it might be a two person job. I now have a new set of clippers (With the guard) and a bag of Harley's favourite treats on hand and ready so we will be tackling the job shortly.
 

FrenchieBoy

Well-Known Member
Job done without any problems. He was good as gold with the front feet but a little touchy about the back feet. Some of his favourite treats sorted that out! :thumb:
Edit: Unfortunately it is me that is lacking a bit in confidence and worrying about nipping the quick so I only took the smallest bit off each claw. I guess the confidence will come in time!
 

bogtrotter

Well-Known Member
A mixed bag really most of mine are not a problem but I have one that by the time you are done you feel as if you had gone fifteen rounds with a mike Tyson, she is nine years old always been like this never gets any easier.
 

steve54

Well-Known Member
I had guessed that it might be a two person job. I now have a new set of clippers (With the guard) and a bag of Harley's favourite treats on hand and ready so we will be tackling the job shortly.
As you have done Pete. Just be very careful, and try not to cut too much first off, - to avoid cutting too close to the quick.
Less stress for Harley, and no blood trails around the house :thumb:
 

Labman14

Active Member
As you have done Pete. Just be very careful, and try not to cut too much first off, - to avoid cutting too close to the quick.
Less stress for Harley, and no blood trails around the house :thumb:
Remember the 1st time I tried to clip our dogs claws
Think I was more nervous than the dog as I was petrified I'd hurt her
Luckily all went well and no blood trail so far
 

Pro_carper

Active Member
I do mine my self with my wire snips from work aslong as you dont cut to far back your fine.
The dog and the blood will let you no if you have
 

Top