first shotgun for youngster

tikka 3006

Well-Known Member
#1
Hello guys I have a nine year old and am looking at getting a light weight shotgun for him and was wondering what ye would recommend either 12bore or 20bore
 

baguio

Well-Known Member
#3
28 gauge would be the best option. 12 or 20 gauges are non starters for a 9 year old! My son is nearly 12 and big for his age. He's only just in to small 20 gauge territory! If your son is big enough for a 20 gauge at 9 years old he's destined for a career as a basketball or rugby player!
 
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#4
What a great present and introduction to our wonderful sport.

Agreed. I think 12 would probably be too much. I gave both my boys a 20 bore at 13.

A lot depends on how big he is for his age. He needs something he can handle both in terms of gun fit and recoil. The last thing you want is to put him off with something too violent and that won't be a pleasure to shoot.

If he can handle a 20 I'd say that would be ideal and, with 'normal' chokes, a bit more forgiving in terms of pellet spread/ broken clays. Encouragement and visible results are key at that age.

Jonathan
 

long_range_rob

Well-Known Member
#5
Most modern 410's are built on the same frame as the 20 bore versions and end up weighing more than the 20 bore version. My 11 year old shoots a Yildiz 20 bore youth model using 21gm cartridges and has no problems.
 

timbrayford

Well-Known Member
#8
Most modern 410's are built on the same frame as the 20 bore versions and end up weighing more than the 20 bore version. My 11 year old shoots a Yildiz 20 bore youth model using 21gm cartridges and has no problems.
I agree the Yildiz 20 combined with the 21g load is what my son graduated to after starting off with 11g cartridges in an old .410 sb Cooey.

At 19g the 3" .410 load is just off the 20 bore 21 g which in turn is a lighter load than the 28 bore 24g load. Our local gunshop advised that there was a very narrow choice of 28b loads available, all more expensive than 20 b. You can also buy a spare adult size stock for the Yildiz if you wish to.
 

baguio

Well-Known Member
#9
Most modern 410's are built on the same frame as the 20 bore versions and end up weighing more than the 20 bore version. My 11 year old shoots a Yildiz 20 bore youth model using 21gm cartridges and has no problems.
Fine for an 11 year old but the OP is talking about a 9 year old. Huge difference!
 

tikka 3006

Well-Known Member
#10
Thanks for the replies. I'm 6ft in height and the tops of my son's head is near level to my shoulder. He has shot a 223 already. He also has a number of rabbits to his name already with my hmr. I was thinking 20 bore with light loads. Was going to borrow my friends sbs 20 bore and try him on that
 

Haggis Hunter

Well-Known Member
#11
My girls (10 and 13) use a single barrel Yildiz 410 with 9gm cartridges. The gun weighs 3.5lbs and recoil is negligible. It cost £175 new, I think. They are more than happy to use it and can hit sensible clays with it.

I'd be wary of giving them a shot with a 20br at the moment, one harsh 'kick' and they loose interest fast.

I'd probably go for a 28br Yildiz youth with 14 or 16gm carts next, or an Armsan SA 28br - if they stick with it. They are never going to fire loads of shells so cost of ammo is not a major concern. Choice and cost is acceptable with Just Cartridges (who probably don't yet deliver to Cork right enough!).

I suppose it depends on the kid. If they are up to a 12br with 21gm carts then happy days, the bit of extra weight will take some of the sting out of the recoil - a problem I have seen with lighter 20brs firing 21gm shells.

As usual many (good) answers to the same problem.

Best of luck,

hh
 

slider

Well-Known Member
#12
if the lad is 5ft 8/9in then I would try to pick up a light 12g s/s and use 21g cartridges - can build up the cartridge weight over time without having to change the shotgun.
 
#13
if the lad is 5ft 8/9in then I would try to pick up a light 12g s/s and use 21g cartridges - can build up the cartridge weight over time without having to change the shotgun.
A big lad 9 year old and 5ft 8or 9in don't think there will be many of them.

The trouble with a .410 is you need to be a pretty good shot to hit much with it,so not ideal for a youngster as they can loose interest quick if they can't hit anything, 28b is a much better bet , behaves more like a normal game gun ,20b would be better still but a 20 can be a bit punchy and too much for most nine year olds.
 

jubnut

Well-Known Member
#14
if the lad is 5ft 8/9in then I would try to pick up a light 12g s/s and use 21g cartridges - can build up the cartridge weight over time without having to change the shotgun.
Good advice

I shot my first Wigeon at 8 with a 12 bore. My first shotgun.

I wasn't especially big for my age.

Starting kids with a 20 or a 28 is ******** in my opinion.

If he is strong enough to handle it then use some light loads. Recoil won't be an issue.
 

baguio

Well-Known Member
#15
Good advice

I shot my first Wigeon at 8 with a 12 bore. My first shotgun.

I wasn't especially big for my age.

Starting kids with a 20 or a 28 is ******** in my opinion.

If he is strong enough to handle it then use some light loads. Recoil won't be an issue.
The lad is under 5" tall though (not 5' 8 or 5' 9) and at 9 years old will not be strong enough to handle a 12 gauge safely! I have no idea why using a 28 or 20 gauge is anything other than sensible? Plenty of adults use 20 & 28 gauges and do very well with them. They certainly have plenty of advantages over 12 gauges when out in the field!
Starting a kid of 9 with a 12 gauge is crazy and will do them no favours IMO!
 

slider

Well-Known Member
#16
The lad is under 5" tall though (not 5' 8 or 5' 9) and at 9 years old will not be strong enough to handle a 12 gauge safely! I have no idea why using a 28 or 20 gauge is anything other than sensible? Plenty of adults use 20 & 28 gauges and do very well with them. They certainly have plenty of advantages over 12 gauges when out in the field!
Starting a kid of 9 with a 12 gauge is crazy and will do them no favours IMO!
Apologies but I read it that the lad was shoulder high to his 6ft Dad, that would make him circa 5ft 8in.

A light s/s 12b with 21g cartridges will be no heavier or have no more recoil than many 20b's.

Recoil is simply a reaction to the action of firing the cartridge - 21g is 21g no matter what the bore. The only thing that softens the recoil is the weight of the gun - the heavier the better but in this case the lad needs to be able to lift and hold. I bought my boy a 20g O/U when he was 12 but he found it easier to handle his granddads old S/S.
 

sikasako

Well-Known Member
#17
Be careful. Don't put him off.

My brother in law was introduced to a 12 bore at an early age. He got such a fright he has never shot again. (30 years ago)
Be sensible and start off with a .410 or similar.
 

McKenzie

Well-Known Member
#18
Agreed; small & work up.

Borrow a few & you'll be able to find his comfort zone in a very short space of time. I'd have thought that most clay grounds or instructors would have a few small guns for children, juniors & women just for this purpose. When you've eliminated some you'll be left with the right choice.
 

SJC

Well-Known Member
#19
I would agree with others. I started with a 410, it is a small gauge which obviously means less shot and a higher need for accuracy. That can work one of two way, be very demoralising when you miss everything or rewarding when you become aware of how accurate you are. It's a tough choose as I am sure you don't want to put your son off. My 410 was mostly used on rats which proved great fun, peogien on the other hand....... 28g would be ideal but not so easy to come by or affordable for a first gun. 20g great, 12g just as good. As with rifles recoil is subject to load and weight of gun. I recall my first go with a 12g, a friend of my fathers brought over some low recoil cartridges. They felt fine until my father had a go and said they were no different. He was right. The gun had a bit of wieght to it. Might be an idea to go to a clay range for a lesson were your son can try a few. It is an investment in his, hopefully, long term shooting life.
 

baguio

Well-Known Member
#20
Apologies but I read it that the lad was shoulder high to his 6ft Dad, that would make him circa 5ft 8in.
This is getting silly! A 6" tall man has a head and neck and shoulder length combined of a lot more than 4" slider! I have a big lad of nearly 12 years old and is 5' 4". The OP is talking about a 9 year old! There is a lot more metal in 12 gauge barrels than there is in 20, 28 or 410 barrels so no, the weight at the far end, (which is where the lad will feel it) will not be the same! 9 year old kids have arms like pipe cleaners. They just don't have the strength to handle 12 gauge double barrel guns and single barrel guns kick like hell!
 
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