Humane dispatch of pheasants (or other game birds) outside season

riflerob

Well-Known Member
There's a cock pheasant around our yard yesterday evening / this morning. He's got an injured foot/leg (hops about on one foot, only putting the injured one down when he stops), and he also appears to have a broken wing (will not fly, wing not fully folded in). He's also looking generally shabby and thin.

Am I correct that the law allows me to dispatch him - or any such creature - on the basis that my judgement is that to do so would be a humane act ?

Out of interest, I'd probably do the deed with the 410. You can get within 15-20 feet of him, he'll only move if really forced to do so.
 

Rowey

Well-Known Member
Sometimes they are carrying shot from the end of the season. They can lose condition very slowly especially from leg wounds
 

VSS

Well-Known Member
Shooting any pheasant at close range with a 410 would be an act of mercy, if the alternative is to be wounded at long range next winter.....
 

JTO

Well-Known Member
About 25 years ago, a local keeper was accosted by an RSPCA inspector, who claimed to have seen a limping pheasant nearby. " I expect it's been shot". Was the reply.
 

Jimnydriver

Well-Known Member
You could always catch it and take it to Noel Fitzpatrick . the super vet..... He could
fit it with a prosthetic limb ..rehabilitate it and release it back to the wild..... funded by you of course..... if its managing fine leave it .....or finally wring its neck...... supper.....
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
Wildlife and countryside act 1981 states:


  • a person may take a wild bird if the bird has been injured other than by their own hand and their sole purpose is to tend it and then release it when no longer disabled. These provisions enable people to care for sick, injured or orphaned birds. Additionally, a wild bird may be killed if it is so seriously disabled as to be beyond recovery. Sick and injured birds listed on Schedule 4 should be registered with Defra.
Any gamebird is treated as a protected species outside the shooting season.
 

Pedro

Well-Known Member
Wildlife and countryside act 1981 states:


  • a person may take a wild bird if the bird has been injured other than by their own hand and their sole purpose is to tend it and then release it when no longer disabled. These provisions enable people to care for sick, injured or orphaned birds. Additionally, a wild bird may be killed if it is so seriously disabled as to be beyond recovery. Sick and injured birds listed on Schedule 4 should be registered with Defra.
Any gamebird is treated as a protected species outside the shooting season.
As above. Wild animals and birds can be very resilient and the problem often is whether or not to intervene. Sometimes it's obvious and sometimes not so much. An injured bird might well lose condition whilst it recovers, but may well then thrive. Or not. I should think that if you are acting responsibly and put the bird out of it's misery as you think it isn't going to recover, then you shouldn't be criticised. It isn't an exact science.

On the other hand, if you come across a bird or animal that is injured and patently not going to do anything except suffer and die and you do nothing......
 

pheasant sniper 1

Well-Known Member
With so many people being persecuted for taking gulls ( injured and not ) I don't think it's so clear regarding injury.

Can somebody verify..
You need a general licence GL05 which only applies to b/b gulls.

To take a Herring Gull an A08 licence has to be applied for..

Can the above which mainly relates to pest control be taken if it's deemed an act of mercy ?
 

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