javelin bipods

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keith rippin

Well-Known Member
Am considering a javelin bipod (long) - how do they stand up to hard/long use? e.g does the leg locking system wear or get loose and how resilient are they to accidental knocks (I have in mind carbon flyrods which easily fracture if hit by a weighted fly)?
What is the difference between the Mark 1 and the mark 2?
I am tempted by their light weight and that they do not stick into your back when carrying the rifle as they can detach and go into your pocket.
I have always used Harris bipods and have never had any problem with their robustness or efficiency but they are (comparitively) heavy and are a pain when carrying the rifle.
 

andychas

Well-Known Member
I moved over to a javelin for the same reasons, and have to say I really like it. Ive got the long version and just move it across rifles, the new one looks to have the advantage of folding along the stock (useful) and a bit more streamlined.
I've found it tough and resilient, its been knocked and dropped with no harm done in normal use, especially so as it only gets put on the rifle when you're ready to use it. You're right of course about fly rods sometimes fracturing when hit by a weighted nymph, but thats quite an impact speed and I'm not seeing myself using the bipod for casting or as a hammer anytime soon!
I would definitely recommend having some secure method of carrying your javelin (there are a couple of options from the manufacturer, sling and belt pouch I think). First time out with mine I shot a buck at last light and forgot Id laid it by the rifle, fortunately recovered the next day! Ive made a belt pouch for mine now....
 

wise man

Well-Known Member
I have one . Don't get me wrong it's good but the the Harris is just as good .
for the coast not worth the money a Harris will do what I need
 

hobbit

Active Member
hi, I have a harris, and atlas and a javelin on an anschutz, AI and Blaser respectively (plus the dedicated TRG one on my TRG22 and a phoenix that floats)

The advantages of the Javelin are 1, they are very light, 2, you can remove them easily on the go which can help with shooting sticks, off a bag etc.

Downside is cost and, as andychas alludes to, I do worry that I will lose the bloody thing!

Overall I like it and it has a place - horses for courses as ever - my 2 cents
 

hobbit

Active Member
One other thing - you can get multiple adapters for the javelin at reasonable cost - flat, curved and picatinny, and hence move the bipod easily between rifles

and get a tripod

more money I agree - my blaser javelin bipod only works with the blaser adapter and vice versa however ..... yet another Blaser money making scheme - some good vids on youtube to help make your mind up
 

nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
The key point is how easy and quick they are to remove so you don't have it digging in your back. For me that's where the cost goes and I find it worth jt.

The mark ii has a slightly wider stance to be more stable and the adapter has an extra notch cut in it so you can put the bipod in 180° and it now locks so has no ability to twist for Shooting off a flat level surface. The one that folds flat is the Spartan 300 which is a more tactical picatinny bipod.
 

keith rippin

Well-Known Member
Nun_hunter - when you say the mark ii has no ability to twist, does this mean that you cannot "pan" when looking for or at an animal through the scope?
 

nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
Only if you reverse the bipod in the adaptor. In the standard front facing position it has quite a large degree of pan avaikabke. This just gives a second option to lock it in place. Check out their website for YouTube videos of all the features.
 

Tikka595

Well-Known Member
I have the javelin fitted to my R8 pro success i wouldn't want to be without it now
i carry it in my coat front pocket so always available easy to attach and remove
great not having a bipod fitted when walking with sticks, Highseat or when sitting in the truck shooting out of the window at Charlie.
but if you jump out you pop it on and shoot off the bonnet
i practice on targets at 400yds with the bipod no issues..
if I was shooting deer somewhere that would be from a guaranteed prone I might fit the Harris (on the hills after reds) bit more secure if crawling around ,but for normal everyday shooting deer and foxes
I am happy with the javelin great bipod easy to adjust,
Simple... get one after a while you will wonder how you managed without it..
as Nun-hunter mentioned have a look on YouTube..
Cheers Tikka595
 

keith rippin

Well-Known Member
I am persuaded that a "long" Javelin bipod would suit - thanks for all the help and advice guys.

One question - I like the look and neatness of the "gunsmith's" version of the adapter but I have restocked the particular rifle (Schultz & Larsen Victory in .308) and I doubt that the forend is deep enough to accept that adapter if the magnet is still the screw or bolt (as per the standard adapter). If the magnet in the "gunsmith" version is built into the adapter and the adapter is merely glued into place in the forend however, I can drill the forend to a sufficient depth to take the adapter.

I have looked at the web and although all adapters are shown, I can find nothing in detail how to fit the "gunsmith" version - can anone advise please?

Thanks in advance,

Keith
 

ASHCROFT9491

Well-Known Member
I'm very happy with mine, attaches and removes easy, very light and easy to slip in your pocket. I opted for a small picatinny rail at the front of the rifle for versitility of having the choice of this adapter or other bipods so no stuck with just one choice
 

nun_hunter

Well-Known Member
I fitted the gunsmith adapter to two rifles and it was simply a case of drilling the required diameter hole with a forstner bit and keep checking the depth with the adapter until I was happy with it's position and then flue in with epoxy. Very simple and quick.
 

CCB

Well-Known Member
I am persuaded that a "long" Javelin bipod would suit - thanks for all the help and advice guys.

One question - I like the look and neatness of the "gunsmith's" version of the adapter but I have restocked the particular rifle (Schultz & Larsen Victory in .308) and I doubt that the forend is deep enough to accept that adapter if the magnet is still the screw or bolt (as per the standard adapter). If the magnet in the "gunsmith" version is built into the adapter and the adapter is merely glued into place in the forend however, I can drill the forend to a sufficient depth to take the adapter.

I have looked at the web and although all adapters are shown, I can find nothing in detail how to fit the "gunsmith" version - can anone advise please?

Thanks in advance,

Keith

I bought one with a gunsmith adapter after looking at Mckenzies, i mounted mine to the nose cone of an R8 PS! a 19MM drill a chainsaw file and some 3M clear epoxy did the trick, wasnt that difficult, although it does make you wonder about messing it up, so measure wisely!
 
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