NOTES ON TAKING ON A SYNDICATE PLACE

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sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
We seem to be getting a number of posts offering syndicate places, so I thought it might be helpful to offer a bit of advice to those thinking of taking a place on any deer stalking syndicate/lease.

1. Before parting with ANY money, ask questions locally about the ground. Seek advice from other stalkers regarding the past history of the ground, what the deer numbers are like, past culls etc.
2. Always ask to see the ground, walk it at your own pace, look for evidence of deer activity, it should be plain to see if the area is holding deer. Browse lines, slots, hair on fences etc.
3. Before parting with any money ask to see the a copy of the lease. This is a legal document that should have the name and address of the landowner giving full permission to the lease holder to take and control deer. If its not there DONT PAY ANYTHING, WALK AWAY.
4. Note any footpaths, houses and boundaries of the land. Quite often it is less acerage than discussed, some of it may be out of bounds due to houses or roads etc.
5. Ask to see any cull records for previous lease holders. Again this should give you some indication of deer numbers present. If there is nothing in writing I would be careful.
6. If there is a Pheasant syndicate also on the ground this could cause issues, again I would be careful about accepting the syndicate position.
7. Depending on the size of the ground I would check the syndicate numbers. Many syndicates have large numbers of members for a small area of land. Its not unusual to see 12 members on less than a 1000 acres. Many operate on a rota system. Is this really what you want from your stalking?
8. Insurance will be required, make sure you have it in place and check the lease to see what you as a member may be responsible for. Many estates have their deer lease drawn up by land agents and it can be quite in depth. You may find yourself responsible for damage to fences, ditches and head lands when driving onto and off the ground. Check it before signing.
9. Before you make your final decision read the lease and its contents thoroughly, if your not happy and get fobbed off with stupid responses walk away.
10. Make sure the lease includes the following. Full name and address and contact details of the landowner or his agent acting on his/her behalf. The full name and details of the lease holder, the person running the syndicate. Make sure all the relevant rules and regulations are laid out in the lease, boundaries, other members involved with their names and contact details. Make sure it is signed and dated correctly by the Landowner or his agent, and also the syndicate leader of person taking on the lease. You should have a copy of all of this signed by you and agreed to by all involved along with a map of the land showing boundaries and a list of all other syndicate members and their contact details.

If any of the above does not ring true and there are excuses abound, walk away. This is not a complete list, its just my advice after nearly 40 years of dealing with various estates and landowners with deer stalking. There should be no reason for anyone not to be up front if the lease and syndicate is genuine, if you feel its not right walk away. Money is hard to come by and hard earned by most of us, stalking is becoming ever more popular and ground is in high demand. I hope the enclosed is of some use to those seeking a syndicate place.
 
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tony rentokil

Well-Known Member
Well done, Malc. I for one have fallen foul of this,, £1000 parted,no deer to speak of other folk booked in,same time,,,nowadays I pay for the odd outing,or I am really fortunate to help a top guy,out, on the local estate,who has helped me out no end.
I also had an outing with yourself,ok we didnt see ouwt,well nothing shootable and was offered a free,day,thanks Malc and anyone else who has kept me in the stalking game.
Regards Tony Rentokil.
 

Rusty Gate

Well-Known Member
We seem to be getting a number of posts offering syndicate places, so I thought it might be helpful to offer a bit of advice to those thinking of taking a place on any deer stalking syndicate/lease.

1. Before parting with ANY money, ask questions locally about the ground. Seek advice from other stalkers regarding the past history of the ground, what the deer numbers are like, past culls etc.
2. Always ask to see the ground, walk it at your own pace, look for evidence of deer activity, it should be plain to see if the area is holding deer. Browse lines, slots, hair on fences etc.
3. Before parting with any money ask to see the a copy of the lease. This is a legal document that should have the name and address of the landowner giving full permission to the lease holder to take and control deer. If its not there DONT PAY ANYTHING, WALK AWAY.
4. Note any footpaths, houses and boundaries of the land. Quite often it is less acerage than discussed, some of it may be out of bounds due to houses or roads etc.
5. Ask to see any cull records for previous lease holders. Again this should give you some indication of deer numbers present. If there is nothing in writing I would be careful.
6. If there is a Pheasant syndicate also on the ground this could cause issues, again I would be careful about accepting the syndicate position.
7. Depending on the size of the ground I would check the syndicate numbers. Many syndicates have large numbers of members for a small area of land. Its not unusual to see 12 members on less than a 1000 acres. Many operate on a rota system. Is this really what you want from your stalking?
8. Insurance will be required, make sure you have it in place and check the lease to see what you as a member may be responsible for. Many estates have their deer lease drawn up by land agents and it can be quite in depth. You may find yourself responsible for damage to fences, ditches and head lands when driving onto and off the ground. Check it before signing.
9. Before you make your final decision read the lease and its contents thoroughly, if your not happy and get fobbed off with stupid responses walk away.
10. Make sure the lease includes the following. Full name and address and contact details of the landowner or his agent acting on his/her behalf. The full name and details of the lease holder, the person running the syndicate. Make sure all the relevant rules and regulations are laid out in the lease, boundaries, other members involved with their names and contact details. Make sure it is signed and dated correctly by the Landowner or his agent, and also the syndicate leader of person taking on the lease. You should have a copy of all of this signed by you and agreed to by all involved along with a map of the land showing boundaries and a list of all other syndicate members and their contact details.

If any of the above does not ring true and there are excuses abound, walk away. This is not a complete list, its just my advice after nearly 40 years of dealing with various estates and landowners with deer stalking. There should be no reason for anyone not to be up front if the lease and syndicate is genuine, if you feel its not right walk away. Money is hard to come by and hard earned by most of us, stalking is becoming ever more popular and ground is in high demand. I hope the enclosed is of some use to those seeking a syndicate place.
:thumb: Can this post be pinned, sticked whatever
 

AN DU RU FOX

Well-Known Member
This info is second nature to lads with a bit of knowledge about whats what but its in very short supply for new lads coming up for umpteen reasons,poaching/lease jumping etc , This post should be made a sticky for the new lads because sometimes it looks like a closed shop from the outside looking in. well done Malc.
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
This info is second nature to lads with a bit of knowledge about whats what but its in very short supply for new lads coming up for umpteen reasons,poaching/lease jumping etc , This post should be made a sticky for the new lads because sometimes it looks like a closed shop from the outside looking in. well done Malc.
It is a sticky mate.
 

howy308

Well-Known Member
Some good advice given there.
One point I would add is to make sure lease holder does not also take out paid guests who are not members of the syndicate

Just like Johnathan Mellars Liddlesdale stalking joined a syndicate of his only to find out through photos on this site he took out paying guests. Then he puts out false figures to get new stalkers on the ground
 

jimbo1984

Well-Known Member
As before id be interested to hear about companies offering insurance for deer stalking syndicates. I asked BASC about it and got nothing but a statement their members were individualy covered? But that was four or five years ago so has anything changed
Funny 5 years ago you didn’t have your fac did you ?
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
I put the original post up to help new people coming into stalking, but yet again we have the 5 minute wonders making comments. I have removed the unwanted posts and will re lock the thread, whilst making it a sticky.
Some people tread a thin line with me. Off to Scotland with clients. And not a syndicate either.
 
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jimbo1984

Well-Known Member
Just like Johnathan Mellars Liddlesdale stalking joined a syndicate of his only to find out through photos on this site he took out paying guests. Then he puts out false figures to get new stalkers on the ground
This happens a fair bit to be honest , as Malcolm says ask around first stalking is a small world and bad reputations travel fast
 
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