Pitting on brand new DPT moderator

CDSG Shooting Sports

nicowilson

Well-Known Member
Earlier this week a friend helped me zero a brand new Tikka T3x in .308 Win. On the end of the barrel was a new DPT moderator. I fired 57 shots. I took the mod off, followed the manufacturer's instructions and cleaned it in warm soapy water. There is some slight pitting on each of the sections of the moderator. Is this something that I should worry about?

Apologies for the slightly blurred image but it's been very difficult to get it pin sharp.

 

nicowilson

Well-Known Member
I should mention that:
- I used a selection of factory ammo
- I stopped shooting with ammo from one box of factory ammo (Remington Corelokt PSP) as it seemed to be leaving unignited powder in the barrel.
 

Jezza308

Well-Known Member
Hi Nico, Can't offer an opinion on the pitting but I would be very interested to hear other opinions because I am just about to buy a DPT over barrel in .308. If you get any expert opinion from the place you purchased it or feedback from the manufacturer I would appreciate a PM.
Cheers Jerry ;)
 

I. Farticus

Well-Known Member
Nico

I reckon it was the 2 rounds of dodgy Remington ammo... Mine has only had the 27 rounds through it on the bench next to you on Weds, and is showing no signs of anything at all.

All - These 2 rounds of Remington had a completely different sound, and left what looked like sludge in the bottom of the barrel. Upon pushing a mop up, there was unburnt powder on the paper that we'd positioned under the end of the barrel. I've never seen anything like this so just a heads-up.

Nico - Can you post the specifics of the ammo, inc. batch number and where you bought it from please.
 

Taff

Well-Known Member
This is normal on all mods, ( most you do not see it as they don,t come apart ) contact the boys at DPT and all will be explained. Or look on NZHS forum In "DPT baffle corrosion " in the firearms, optics and accessories section, page 3. Hope this helps.
 

Milligan

Well-Known Member
I'm more interested in how it took 57 shots to zero, with help? :eek:
Gas cutting is normal on alu mods, it's the tradeoff.
Most have a limited lifetime guarantee, basically you get a discount on new baffles.
 

ejg

Well-Known Member
I have one of the first prototype Roedale ultra light alu mods on my 308. I don't know but good 6 years. Shot couple competitions with it and use it for target practice as well as all my stalking. I have never taken it apart and it still seems to be as good as on the first day although I am sure she is well pitted inside. Especially alu mods start pitting with the first shot. One customer of ours had an alu mod on a 223 which was in a very bad condition after a bit over 1000 rounds.
My suggestion.... don't take it apart, just shoot, maybe wash it out every now and then and spray with oil/wd40.
edi
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
I'm more interested in how it took 57 shots to zero, with help? :eek:
Gas cutting is normal on alu mods, it's the tradeoff.
Most have a limited lifetime guarantee, basically you get a discount on new baffles.

My initial thought also. I take it that there was a fair bit of shooting practise involved too and not 75 shots just to zero the rifle.

Shooting that many rounds could generate a tremendous amount of extremely hot gasses causing more than usual pitting if the moderator isn't allowed to cool between strings. That's why many moderators have stainless steel baffles or at least the first baffle is stainless anyway. If I had a lightweight all aluminium moderator I would definitely be limiting the number of shots that I took before allowing the moderator to cool down to 3 shots. Which is what I would normally do anyway when zeroing or checking a load, and some of the baffles in my moderator are stainless steel.

Nico is it possible for you to rotate the baffles around in your moderator (front to back and move one forward each time it is stripped) so as to even out the wear that they get?
 
Last edited:

straightpull6547

Well-Known Member
I'd just put it back together, tape up the outside with cammo tape, and go shooting (and sleep at night). Modeartors are made this way because production is cheaper. They are not meant to be cleaned. The manufacturers use the cleaning ability as a selling point over non stripable units.
 

Taff

Well-Known Member
My initial thought also. I take it that there was a fair bit of shooting practise involved too and not 75 shots just to zero the rifle.

Shooting that many rounds could generate a tremendous amount of extremely hot gasses causing more than usual pitting if the moderator isn't allowed to cool between strings. That's why many moderators have stainless steel baffles or at least the first baffle is stainless anyway. If I had a lightweight all aluminium moderator I would definitely be limiting the number of shots that I took before allowing the moderator to cool down to 3 shots. Which is what I would normally do anyway when zeroing or checking a load, and some of the baffles in my moderator are stainless steel.

Nico is it possible for you to rotate the baffles around in your moderator (front to back and move one forward each time it is stripped) so as to even out the wear that they get?
You can fit a stainless baffle into a DPT , as recommended for magnum rounds
 

big ears

Well-Known Member
I have a DPT on a 6.5 and the advice I was given was this was a stalking mod not a range mod. Putting 57 rounds through it in quick succession is probably what did it. I use a heave wildcat for range work then once a load found out the DPT on and re zero, usually only putting 3-4 rounds through it. I then spray it with WD40. This is what Steve in Ivythorn told me to do and it has worked a treat.
BE
 

E. Fudd

Well-Known Member
Earlier this week a friend helped me zero a brand new Tikka T3x in .308 Win. On the end of the barrel was a new DPT moderator. I fired 57 shots. I took the mod off, followed the manufacturer's instructions and cleaned it in warm soapy water. There is some slight pitting on each of the sections of the moderator. Is this something that I should worry about?

Apologies for the slightly blurred image but it's been very difficult to get it pin sharp.


Its normal with any mod to have the first couple of baffles degrade sooner than the others and the first one is the one which starts to fall to bits usually and thats when bits start to fall out of unstripable moderators. Look at this from a positive point of view, you can swap your baffles around every 100 shots or so and that will spread the wear out much more evenly.

Alternatively DFT will sell you a single baffle when you need to replace the first one, I like the idea of strippable mods but dont expect that you should take them apart and clean them after every use, it will just drive you mad. Personally I would switch baffles every 100 rounds as far as possible they buy a new baffle to replace the most worn out one when it comes to that. Even when you wear the hole in the first baffle to twice its size the mod will still work almost as good as new.

Imagine what the inside of your cars exhaust looks like after 10,000 miles, moderators must be looked at as disposable, especially lightweight aluminium ones.
 
Last edited:

JTO

Well-Known Member
I have a DPT on a 6.5 and the advice I was given was this was a stalking mod not a range mod. Putting 57 rounds through it in quick succession is probably what did it.
My thoughts as I read the thread! Sounds like range moderators need to be heavier duty/different metal.
 

nicowilson

Well-Known Member
Nico

I reckon it was the 2 rounds of dodgy Remington ammo... Mine has only had the 27 rounds through it on the bench next to you on Weds, and is showing no signs of anything at all.

All - These 2 rounds of Remington had a completely different sound, and left what looked like sludge in the bottom of the barrel. Upon pushing a mop up, there was unburnt powder on the paper that we'd positioned under the end of the barrel. I've never seen anything like this so just a heads-up.

Nico - Can you post the specifics of the ammo, inc. batch number and where you bought it from please.

It was Remington ammo, bought from Sheephouse Shooting Supplies in Maidenhead. Here's a photo of the flattened out box to show the precise type and I believe the batch number is on the end flap:


 

nicowilson

Well-Known Member
I'm more interested in how it took 57 shots to zero, with help? :eek:

It took me a fair old time to work out how to hold the rifle steady. Other than my DSC1 in 2015 and one shot earlier this week for my first ever deer, it's 30 or so years since I've fired a rifle.

Fair to say that Iain was exceptionally patient with me!
 

nicowilson

Well-Known Member
My initial thought also. I take it that there was a fair bit of shooting practise involved too and not 75 shots just to zero the rifle.

Shooting that many rounds could generate a tremendous amount of extremely hot gasses causing more than usual pitting if the moderator isn't allowed to cool between strings. That's why many moderators have stainless steel baffles or at least the first baffle is stainless anyway. If I had a lightweight all aluminium moderator I would definitely be limiting the number of shots that I took before allowing the moderator to cool down to 3 shots. Which is what I would normally do anyway when zeroing or checking a load, and some of the baffles in my moderator are stainless steel.

Nico is it possible for you to rotate the baffles around in your moderator (front to back and move one forward each time it is stripped) so as to even out the wear that they get?

Yes, there was a lot of shooting practice.

Thanks for the idea of rotating the baffles.
 

nicowilson

Well-Known Member
I have a DPT on a 6.5 and the advice I was given was this was a stalking mod not a range mod. Putting 57 rounds through it in quick succession is probably what did it. I use a heave wildcat for range work then once a load found out the DPT on and re zero, usually only putting 3-4 rounds through it. I then spray it with WD40. This is what Steve in Ivythorn told me to do and it has worked a treat.
BE

It was 57 rounds over the course of 4 hours, with the mod removed and the barrel allowed to cool after every 3 or 4 rounds.
 

Milligan

Well-Known Member
It took me a fair old time to work out how to hold the rifle steady. Other than my DSC1 in 2015 and one shot earlier this week for my first ever deer, it's 30 or so years since I've fired a rifle.

Fair to say that Iain was exceptionally patient with me!
Fair enough, just teasing.:)
Nothing wrong with practice and training, at all.

In all earnest I wouldn't worry about the mod, consider the first baffle a consumable.

If you are however going to shoot a lot on ranges then an all steel mod is the way forward. ASE Northstar etc are bomb proof, but very heavy.
 

dpt

New Member
Hi All,

I'm Darren Toms the owner of DPT suppressors in new Zealand.

Its a funny thing with suppressors that can be dissembled (and probably a down side of them), some people do freak out with the first sign of wear.
The wear on the baffles does look normal.

See bellow a little snippet from our instructions that are supplied with each suppressor we sell.

"
After the first 20 or so rounds you may find pitting on the module closest to the muzzle , that is nothing to be concerned about as its the anodizing wearing off, after the initial pitting you will find it wont change much the next few hundred rounds, life expectancy of that module is around 2000 rounds on a 22 inch hunting rifle. To prolong the life of the modules, when cleaning don't clean the carbon off the front face of the modules as it protects it. Life expectancy of the suppressor can be improved by not getting it too hot, a good rule of thumb is an average of 60 rounds an hour and 30 rounds an hour with a protective sleeve on the suppressor (because it slows the heat dispersion).If stainless steel blast baffle is used the round count goes up to 90 rounds per hour without sleeve and 45 rounds per hour with sleeve."

I hope that puts your mind at rest. :)

Darren
 
New Avon Arms
Top