Puppy chew toy

angusb1

Well-Known Member
Our 10 week old puppy is chewing stuff all the time as they do at that age, and what she seems to like best are things that are at the right height for her and don't move, like the knobs on the dresser and coffee table drawer. She sleeps in a crate and goes in a pen for some time in the day and I thought it might be good for her to have a nylon chew toy that I could fix to the pen and the crate. I wouldn't want her to have anything but a nylon chew toy unsupervised. I've googled it but I'm not finding anything. I could probably make something to hold a nylabone but it would be easier to buy something if there is such a thing. Anyone ever seen something like this?
 

angusb1

Well-Known Member
Yeah a toy with treats in is her favourite but she will choose an immobile object over most of her toys that don't have food in. That's what got me thinking if I could fix a nylon bone to something that doesn't move she would really like it. Might save me resorting to bribery with treats.
 

Pedro

Well-Known Member
The problem with items made for dogs to chew is that (generally) they resist chewing and stay whole. Chair legs, knobs (ooer) and most other items however satisfyingly crumble under the onslaught.

You could try a Kong, fill it up with something nice for them to extract. Or simply put your hard hat on and wait for it all to stop.
 

angusb1

Well-Known Member
That might well be it. She probably just enjoys the destruction 🙂. The Kong is a favourite but it can't hurt to find other toys she likes too
 

Koenig

Well-Known Member
Kong stuff is very good and lasts. Our GR is a prolific chewer. Most toys last 10-30 mins! You can get a spray for chair legs or other things you don’t want destroyed. I think it’s called No Chew or something similar. Smells of Citronella and does seem to put her off.
 

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
They are programmed to chew - some do so more than others. Naturally, it would be stones/rocks/branches/bones. When you are domesticating you have to first accept what they are doing is 100% normal and natural and then overcome the damage by a number of methods - segregation with correct crate training as opposed to locking them up - distraction with something that they are allowed to chew (keep changing and swapping so they don't get bored with the same old thing) - and training as in learning NO or LEAVE IT!
 

angusb1

Well-Known Member
Cheers Keith, from what you say, we are doing the right things. All of what you have said is what we are doing, I thought a "static" toy she's allowed to chew might be a useful toy to alternate amongst the others and might help when she's not happy about being in the crate or pen. I'm happy about how she's getting on with the training, and as toys are something to bribe her with, giving her one she likes to play with would be useful. Appreciate your advice, thanks.
 

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
Cheers Keith, from what you say, we are doing the right things. All of what you have said is what we are doing, I thought a "static" toy she's allowed to chew might be a useful toy to alternate amongst the others and might help when she's not happy about being in the crate or pen. I'm happy about how she's getting on with the training, and as toys are something to bribe her with, giving her one she likes to play with would be useful. Appreciate your advice, thanks.
It's a pain in the backside but once they've grown out of it you'll forget it ever happened....you'll just have sheep worrying to deal with then :) Only joking but you do soon forget all about it
 

Rob Dhu

Well-Known Member
Haven't found a toy that is indistructable. have a plastic bone the young dog chews but not for long.
in the garden w have started keeping small pieces of branches up to 2 inches thick. The lab and the young alpine chew them happily for ages. the 8 year old lab has the cleanest teeth.
 

Keith Edmunds

Well-Known Member
Haven't found a toy that is indistructable. have a plastic bone the young dog chews but not for long.
in the garden w have started keeping small pieces of branches up to 2 inches thick. The lab and the young alpine chew them happily for ages. the 8 year old lab has the cleanest teeth.
Me too, I honestly sticks are great.
 

Rob Dhu

Well-Known Member
Scandially, I'm not talking sticks they can swallow, big chunks that they happily chew and spit out. unlike bone which they have a tendency to swallow even when they are big pieces. i was just saying to the wife I should bag the piles in the garden and sell as weed control covering.
 
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