Road traffic collisions with boar.

BRACES of Bristol - Mauser M12 with Schmidt & Bender 2.5-10x56 Illuminated Scope

Foxyboy43

Well-Known Member
I too was surprised by the low number reported in France from the article I quoted. Call me an old sceptic if you like but either the number attributed to the U.K. is far too high or else the number given for France is far too low. Perhaps we are comparing apples to pears and the numbers have been collated in a totally different way, with one country recording all collisions and the other country only recording serious injuries or damage above a certain amount?

One thing that I have noticed in France on most of the busier regional routes (not motorways) is that the verges are cut well back from the roads. In the U.K. its common for woods to extend right up to the kerbside.
Surely you are not suggesting that our erstwhile friends could be telling “porkies”? Gracious, the very thought, next it will be Italy, Greece, Portugal, Spain and all the “stans” and “anias”........
🦊🦊
 

pinguisgod

Well-Known Member
I was reading earlier this morning about a boar collision that occurred in Haute-Vienne (France) on Tuesday morning that resulted in the deaths of a young family of four. The car collided with a large boar that crossed the road and careered into a tree resulting in the deaths of a 29 year old man his 26 year old wife and their two children aged 7 and 1. The report gives a number for wild animal collisions reported in France up until January 1st 2021 of 10,794 but it does not say over what period of time, presumably over 12 months.

It then got me thinking about the fatal incident on the M4 in Wiltshire a few years back where a car collided with a boar.
It also reminded me at about at around the same time one of our fellow site members (Ben) had a very serious collision with a boar in the Forest of Dean. Ben ended up extremely seriously injured in hospital. He had been booked to attend the H4H shoot a few days later and it was at the shoot that his friend Karen informed us of his accident. It's very remiss of me and long long overdue but I'm ashamed to say we seem to have lost contact, and neither Ben nor Karen have posted since then that I am aware of. Does anyone have any up dates on Ben's recovery and whether he has had the opportunity to extract his revenge on the boar population of the Forest of Dean.
Funnily enough Mike Karen mentioned at the weekend that you had asked and she forgot to pass it on. But thanks for the concern. Haven't been on in ages so missed this post myself, hopefully we will catch up soon.

I have an increased scrap value due to 3 plates and a knee that is about 20 years older than the rest of me but so far it's not given me any troubles bar the the odd twinge.
Won't say the boar I have shot since have leveled the score but I am working on it, 3 in the last 6 months is a fair start but more to repay.
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
So glad to hear that you're back in the saddle even if you are now carrying a bit of ironmongery. I know the feeling about feeling 20 years older than you should and perhaps being a little bit less agile. :tiphat:
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
Ah, the Internet story. That well-known tome of truthfulness and fact. And the old trick of sitting well back behind the animal. A bit like holding your fish well out in front of you for the obligatory photo.

Now I have seen some truly massive pigs in my time, particularly in northern Australia where we hunted them with great fervour. Thing is they were not wild boar by any stretch of the imagination, they were mongrel feral pigs originally crossed for size and meatiness before their ancestors gained their freedom. The Australians measure the pig’s weight with the guts in, unlike us here in New Zealand where we measure weight fully gutted. In all my years in both countries and a fair bit of time in the US I have never come across a truly wild pig that weighed more than 400lbs. The absolute biggest ones we shot in Australia were fed on grains, sugar cane and bananas and whatever else they could thieve, and they never got bigger than 400lb guts in. (We would shoot them with 12 gauge solids and drag them with the LandCruiser down to the mangroves for the crocs. Who would be waiting. Patiently.)

I’m sitting in the living room of our homestead typing this surrounded by the most hard-core internationally experienced pig hunters you will ever meet, and all of them think these monster pig stories are complete BS!
You can’t compare wild pigs from the other side of the world to the European wild boar. A young male wild boar of about a year old in my family’s part of germany normally weighs between 90 And 120 kg with guts in, I’ve seen literally hundreds of male and female wild boar shot that weighed around the 150 kg mark and a handful that weighed just over 200kg and they required a tractor to move them.
A few years back I went out to sit for some wild boar one afternoon in the forrest where I was working in Germany on a hunting estate. To get into the high seat I had to walk through a load of chest high ferns , I climbed up into my seat, made myself comfortable and was just putting a cartridge back in the chamber when a wild boar ( Keiler) took off like a flipping rocket from about a meter away from where I’d climbed up into the highseat. I must have been stood not more than a meter from it as I got I to the highseat and it had just laid there and waited for a good moment to leg it away, extremely cunning beast ! Obviously it got away as it took me by such surprise that by the time I saw it cross a ride with a clear shot it was too late. That was the biggest wild boar I’ve ever seen and it wouldn’t surprise me if that was well over 250kg, getting towards the 300kg mark. it was absolutely huge.
kindest regards, Olaf
 

dodgyknees

Well-Known Member
That was the biggest wild boar I’ve ever seen and it wouldn’t surprise me if that was well over 250kg, getting towards the 300kg mark.
Would certainly be a big surprise if it was really that big Olaf! Eyes and brain do all sorts of weird things when excited.

The problem you fellas have with all these enormous boar stories is that there is very, very little in the offical record to support these claims. Next to nothing. Bugger all. I think we can agree that the ones in eastern Russia / Manchuria etc get fairly colossal, but again, coming back to the original post that kicked this all off (400kg!), there’s nothing to support it other than silly photos.

FYI out heaviest feral (wild) pigs top out at about 200kg liveweight, according to our historic record. I’ve never come across one that big. 200kg, not coincidentally, is what most of the available German information says about maximum weight of Western and Central European boar.

So what is the Deutsche Wildscwein Rekord?
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
Would certainly be a big surprise if it was really that big Olaf! Eyes and brain do all sorts of weird things when excited.

The problem you fellas have with all these enormous boar stories is that there is very, very little in the offical record to support these claims. Next to nothing. Bugger all. I think we can agree that the ones in eastern Russia / Manchuria etc get fairly colossal, but again, coming back to the original post that kicked this all off (400kg!), there’s nothing to support it other than silly photos.

FYI out heaviest feral (wild) pigs top out at about 200kg liveweight, according to our historic record. I’ve never come across one that big. 200kg, not coincidentally, is what most of the available German information says about maximum weight of Western and Central European boar.

So what is the Deutsche Wildscwein Rekord?
Sorry, but I don’t see what relevance there is in comparing these escaped farm yard pigs and feral pigs you have experience with to the European Wild Boar.. they are quite different beasts. In my opinion , based on my experiences , boar around and over 100kg are very common , over 150kg is a massive beast. 400kg is a rather UFO type sea serpent unsupported claim that makes me laugh. That massive thing of a wild boar I saw was absolutely huge ,but, it could have just been a very hairy 120 kg wild boar with very big bones. That or I was imagining things, I will never know. Still, I do love a good hunting story, as they say in Germany; never are so many lies told as after the Jagd and before the wedding :rofl:
Kindest regards, Olaf
 

dodgyknees

Well-Known Member
Sorry, but I don’t see what relevance there is in comparing these escaped farm yard pigs and feral pigs you have experience with to the European Wild Boar.. they are quite different beasts.

:rofl:

Come on over, I’ll arrange a proper pig hunt for you! None of this stand in a row and shoot them nonsense (that’s for scaredy-cats). You’ll be running after a real big angry boar, through the bush, up and down crazy steep hills, with a big as knife and a pack of superhero dogs. When they bail up the pig, you must leap on it and stick it in the heart, ok? Hang on tight, they don’t like that very much!

We’ll see how you feel about our escaped farmyard piggies after that experience.

(I’ll let you practice your pig wrestling skills on our live capture boar first eh, to get your strength up. He’s quite gentle, only killed 3 or 4 dogs so far. He lives on a steady diet of dead goats, deer, cattle and tourists.)

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JH83

Well-Known Member
And yet again the SD has been proven to be a bunch of idiots by ol ‘dodge

My shrine to him is almost complete along with a statue in his likeness, I’ll advertise visits in classifieds when it’s ready. No need to thank me.
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
:rofl:

Come on over, I’ll arrange a proper pig hunt for you! None of this stand in a row and shoot them nonsense (that’s for scaredy-cats). You’ll be running after a real big angry boar, through the bush, up and down crazy steep hills, with a big as knife and a pack of superhero dogs. When they bail up the pig, you must leap on it and stick it in the heart, ok? Hang on tight, they don’t like that very much!

We’ll see how you feel about our escaped farmyard piggies after that experience.

(I’ll let you practice your pig wrestling skills on our live capture boar first eh, to get your strength up. He’s quite gentle, only killed 3 or 4 dogs so far. He lives on a steady diet of dead goats, deer, cattle and tourists.)

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:rofl: Priceless, thanks for that, an entertaining read.
in my youth I worked on a pig research farm , I know how aggressive a domestic boar can be, especially if it feels threatened and I’ve no doubt that your feral pigs can get a bit shirty with a few dogs clamping down on their head.
in Germany and throughout Europe, Killing wild boar with a knife if the dogs have got a hold , is standard practice as it’s not safe to use a gun. sometimes dogs get killed and sometimes so can people. in general, the primary objective of wild boar hunting in Germany , is to avoid such events as much as possible as opposed to encouraging them to happen, and to swiftly and efficiently kill the animals in a humane way for the benefits of conservation and hunting. My original point was not meant to belittle your feral wild farm pig hunting, it’s just a salient fact that completely different breeds of escaped farm yard pigs on the other side of the world are not the same as European wild boar.
I wouldn’t suggest that you try hunting with your super hero dogs and hunting knife on the legendary 400kg European wild boar though, I’d imagine you would all struggle a bit :rofl:
Kindest regards, Olaf
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
That’s no fun, that’s boring!

Ha! Geddit? Boaring!

God I’m funny. Eh @JH83.
yes, some people do like a bit of a violent challenge don’t they.
I’ve got good friends who are professional scent hound handlers and they are very experienced at dealing with such situations where a dog has got locked onto a very aggressive wild boar. In Germany, scent dogs are trained not to make physical contact with an animal, rather to bay it so that the handler can catch up and then safely dispatch the animal, thus minimising the risk of injury to the dog or dogs. Obviously, sometimes things can get complicated though and a dog or dogs will go in and attack in a bid to protect themselves or their handlers and sometimes it’s either dangerous to call the dog off or it’s just not possible and then a knife is used. In contrast to your very brave and sharp feral pig dogs , in Germany Sharp ( aggressive) scent dogs ( usually Bavarian mountain hounds or Hanoverian hounds) are seen as a training or breeding failure and don’t pass their training Assessments, they are trained to bay an animal and not to attack it without the handlers command. Don’t get me wrong, they are very capable of defending themselves or their handlers if need be though and will go in and attack if given a command to do so, similar to a military attack dog.
Most of the year wild boar are shot through sitting out at night or stealthy stalking or sitting out on the edge of a field of crops during harvesting of the crops. Late in the year driven wild boar hunting is used, but the main aim of the dogs is to carefully cause the wild boar to calmly move past carefully positioned hunters. Dogs that fly off and try to attack game are not wanted on such hunts as they cause many problems and can ruin a carefully designed hunt. The objective is to gently move the wild boar through the forrest and not get so close to the boar as to cause them to break into a full on run or turn on the dogs in an act of self defence or aggression. It’s a very efficient and effective form of hunting but is used sparingly ( only once or twice a year ) as the softly softly approach yields the highest returns with wild boar in the German countryside.
kindest regards, Olaf
 

Bavarianbrit

Well-Known Member
Yep, here in Bavaria the villages tend to be spaced 3-4 KMs apart so there is not a lot of area free for running of hounds or boar mainly due to the right to roam law for walkers & bicycle riders filling these areas at weekends this since Goering through his chief forester Walter frevert brought this "Tierschutzgesetz" law in in 1933.
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
Yep, here in Bavaria the villages tend to be spaced 3-4 KMs apart so there is not a lot of area free for running of hounds or boar mainly due to the right to roam law for walkers & bicycle riders filling these areas at weekends this since Goering through his chief forester Walter frevert brought this "Tierschutzgesetz" law in in 1933.
Yes, badly trained dogs as well as a too aggressive a driven hunt method causing wild boar and other large game animals to start running for their lives is a primary thing that is actively avoided. Asides from all the other problems it can cause, a major concern in the planning of a driven hunt is preventing animals from being driven towards roads. The worst is an out of control dog going after an animal and causing a traffic accident. Signs are put out on roads warning drivers to drive slowly and with caution as a hunt is in progress. In other areas where really busy roads are in close proximity to an area where hunting is required , the road is either closed for an hour or so or it is only hunted using the stealth methods of Highseats or stalking.
kindest regards, Olaf
 
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