Torque Screwdrivers

Sans Culottes

Well-Known Member
Thinking of investing in a Torque Screw driver for scope mounting , action screws etc.

Any experience of a sensibly priced option? I am not looking to become a professional gunsmith , just torque up scrres etc. on my own kit with a reasonable degree of accuracy.

Cheers

Chris
 

reloader54

Well-Known Member
another vote for the wheeler fat wrench above, I have the older analogue version, also available in digital [electronic] now, but a little more expensive.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
I would be very careful when using a torque rench on rifle screws. They rather reduce the ability to feel the screw and the level of tightness. And most screws are not big and very easily sheared.
 

sauer

Well-Known Member
Eh?...... isn’t that the point of the torque wrench?
You find out the specific value of torque recommended then do that and no more ...
Any torque wrench I’ve used you can still “ feel” the screw


Paul
 

reloader54

Well-Known Member
I would be very careful when using a torque rench on rifle screws. They rather reduce the ability to feel the screw and the level of tightness. And most screws are not big and very easily sheared.


that makes no sense?? they're able to measure the correct torque of the particular screw.bolt, ect, and if set correctly you cant over tighten.
 

Heym SR20

Well-Known Member
that makes no sense?? they're able to measure the correct torque of the particular screw.bolt, ect, and if set correctly you cant over tighten.

You can't feel if the screw is stuck, cross threaded, bottomed out etc before you get to the correct torque. If the screw is not properly lubricated it won't torque correctly. With a simple allen key, or simple screwdriver you have all the feel that you need.
 

Ray7756

Well-Known Member
You can't feel if the screw is stuck, cross threaded, bottomed out etc before you get to the correct torque. If the screw is not properly lubricated it won't torque correctly. With a simple allen key, or simple screwdriver you have all the feel that you need.
I can see both sides here, simply start thread by hand and allan key then finish of with touque
i have only ever used allan key and feel how tight it is, but some people like to think they are getting it perfect its up to you how much you spend on kit
Cheers
Ray
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
that makes no sense?? they're able to measure the correct torque of the particular screw.bolt, ect, and if set correctly you cant over tighten.

So I would have agreed with you until last week. And then I snapped a scope base screw in a brand new action, using a torque screwdriver. I had the torque set to the recommended level, and it still went. Turns out that it had bottomed out. Heym SR20 found it very funny...
 

User0003

Well-Known Member
I prefer when receive threads for mounts are drilled through, stops any such isssues.
Didnt I say, just hand ‘firm’ does it ;)

to to be fair, it also pays to use high quality steel screws, which are usually only supplied by the top 3 or so mount makers. Most factory screws these days are of pathetic quality, even from makers of which one would think higher.

you could also ask Heym for a lower factory rear sight blade to work with your ammo choice, they may be happy to supply this. Then you have useful irons as opposed to a 10” hold under

So I would have agreed with you until last week. And then I snapped a scope base screw in a brand new action, using a torque screwdriver. I had the torque set to the recommended level, and it still went. Turns out that it had bottomed out. Heym SR20 found it very funny...
 

scrumbag

Well-Known Member
I prefer when receive threads for mounts are drilled through, stops any such isssues.
Didnt I say, just hand ‘firm’ does it ;)

to to be fair, it also pays to use high quality steel screws, which are usually only supplied by the top 3 or so mount makers. Most factory screws these days are of pathetic quality, even from makers of which one would think higher.

you could also ask Heym for a lower factory rear sight blade to work with your ammo choice, they may be happy to supply this. Then you have useful irons as opposed to a 10” hold under

Yeah, amazing how soft some screws are. Also, what is it with some manufacturers still using ridiculously narrow flat head screw heads!
 

reloader54

Well-Known Member
You can't feel if the screw is stuck, cross threaded, bottomed out etc before you get to the correct torque. If the screw is not properly lubricated it won't torque correctly. With a simple allen key, or simple screwdriver you have all the feel that you need.


with respect, lets not confuse lack of mechanical aptitude /oversight,or indeed cheap chinese fittings, crossed threading, bad threads, and mismatched metals,ect, with the benefits of a correctly used torque wrench,
the instructions are clearly printed on a wheeler wrench in relation to steel and soft aluminium screws/bolts. and the recommended torque.

Take an ordinary bolt and see how close you can get to the recommended torque [after making sure its the correct thread,length, ect,] with and without a torque wrench, if you use good quality fittings you can get it perfect with the wrench equal and consistent. without it unless you're prepared to trust luck, or a highly experienced gunsmith you cant be certain, that's when zeros mysteriously move and scopes get damaged.
 

johngryphon

Well-Known Member
with respect, lets not confuse lack of mechanical aptitude /oversight,or indeed cheap chinese fittings, crossed threading, bad threads, and mismatched metals,ect, with the benefits of a correctly used torque wrench,
the instructions are clearly printed on a wheeler wrench in relation to steel and soft aluminium screws/bolts. and the recommended torque.

Take an ordinary bolt and see how close you can get to the recommended torque [after making sure its the correct thread,length, ect,] with and without a torque wrench, if you use good quality fittings you can get it perfect with the wrench equal and consistent. without it unless you're prepared to trust luck, or a highly experienced gunsmith you cant be certain, that's when zeros mysteriously move and scopes get damaged.

+ 1 Yep you have nailed it there.
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
.

you could also ask Heym for a lower factory rear sight blade to work with your ammo choice, they may be happy to supply this. Then you have useful irons as opposed to a 10” hold under

So yes, there are blades of different lengths available, both front and rear. I am looking into replacing the front blade. However, this may not be necessary, since it seems there is an adjustment screw for the front blade. Far preferable to filing!
 

Mungo

Well-Known Member
with respect, lets not confuse lack of mechanical aptitude /oversight,or indeed cheap chinese fittings, crossed threading, bad threads, and mismatched metals,ect, with the benefits of a correctly used torque wrench,
the instructions are clearly printed on a wheeler wrench in relation to steel and soft aluminium screws/bolts. and the recommended torque.

Take an ordinary bolt and see how close you can get to the recommended torque [after making sure its the correct thread,length, ect,] with and without a torque wrench, if you use good quality fittings you can get it perfect with the wrench equal and consistent. without it unless you're prepared to trust luck, or a highly experienced gunsmith you cant be certain, that's when zeros mysteriously move and scopes get damaged.

In this instance, I freely hold my hand up and admit operator incompetence - I just wasn’t paying enough attention. I have absolutely no doubt that, used properly, they will give far better repeatability for someone as mechanically inept as me than guessing at it.
 

reloader54

Well-Known Member
In this instance, I freely hold my hand up and admit operator incompetence - I just wasn’t paying enough attention. I have absolutely no doubt that, used properly, they will give far better repeatability for someone as mechanically inept as me than guessing at it.


it was not my intention to make any individual look bad, and it shouldn't be the case that certain purveyors of scope fittings that are not fit for purpose. unfortunately the situation exists.
 

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