Wild Boar spotted at Wishaw

opticron1

Well-Known Member
Quite an amusing tale on the BBC website which shows a Boar beside the railway line in Wishaw - probably trying to get away from the ne'er do wells that inhabit the area:eek:! I knew there were quite a few around Dumfries and Galloway so it seems they are gradually spreading out..... today Wishaw... tomorrow the world.....
 

Lateral

Well-Known Member
Quite an amusing tale on the BBC website which shows a Boar beside the railway line in Wishaw - probably trying to get away from the ne'er do wells that inhabit the area:eek:! I knew there were quite a few around Dumfries and Galloway so it seems they are gradually spreading out..... today Wishaw... tomorrow the world.....
That's what happens, when they realize they can hop on a train, rather than having to walk everywhere !
 

topscots1

Well-Known Member
I think they are up around Perth. There used to be some around Ben WiVis in the highlands. Perhaps taking the lack of shooting and country side activity over the last few months to spread further. They will get everywhere in time.
 

Mossypaw

Well-Known Member
A mate shot 49 south of Drumnadrochit the other week trying to clear a farm of them. He knows it will do nothing as there is that many of them in the surrounding area.
 

Sharpie

Well-Known Member
That's what happens, when they realize they can hop on a train, rather than having to walk everywhere !
Or travel by Ifor Williams. Or bred back from escaped domestic stock, which only takes a few generations/years.

Officially we do not have any true wild boar, they are all feral pigs. I think that is correct.

Apart from the only real ones, that broke out from Hans Rausing's enclosure at Peasmarsh during the storm of 1987, but I think that they have mostly been mopped up, leaving only a tiny, if any, pure gene pool, in my corner of Sussex.

The strange thing is that the Muntjac's march north still seems to have been defeated by Hadrian's wall, or the cold, though there are credible reports that a few have somehow swum across the Irish sea. Allegedly. Along with black panthers and other exotica sometimes reported.

Fortunately it seems that a certain level of population density is required to establish a breeding population of Muntjac (more than just a few smuggled in in a trailer), and if the local hunters also get a little greedy by failing to "manage" their nascent herd but rather start popping them off for sport too soon, it becomes self-limiting.

Which is just as well.

Wild boar ? No, feral pigs. Unfortunately they can breed immensely quickly. Just one escaped pregnant sow can establish a large population, and it seems that their in-breeding plus natural selection rapidly reverts them to type.

Now, a little reported factoid here is that, so called "African" swine flu is raging all over Europe, but fortunately our pig farms have not seen it. Yet. Fatal to pigs, potentially able to jump over to humans. As of 8 April this year, 40% of China's pigs had been wiped out by it.

Have a read of this: African swine fever outbreak reported in western Poland

Ring any bells regarding say keywords "China, virus, biosecurity, denial, cover-up, WHO" etc. ?
"
An outbreak of African swine fever (ASF) was confirmed on Monday on a farm near the village of Więckowice near Poznań in western Poland, less than 150km (93 miles) from the border with Germany.

African swine fever is a highly contagious virus which is fatal to pigs. It is transmitted directly between animals or through infected meat or animal feed and has also been seen as having the potential to transmit to humans. There is an ongoing outbreak in China that has already already wiped out 40% of pigs in the country.


African swine fever destroying small pig farms, as factory farming booms – report
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The outbreak is Poland’s second in 2020 and the first in the Poznań region, an important centre of pig farming.

The source of the infection were ASF-positive piglets that the farm owner, Smithfield Foods’ subsidiary Agri Plus, purchased in mid-March.

The farm in Więckowice specialises in fattening piglets up to 30kg. There are just over 10,000 piglets on the farm that will have to be culled, local authorities said, but the eradication of the outbreak might be slowed by safety and social distancing measures imposed in Poland in order to stop the spread of Covid-19.

The spread of ASF on pig farms and in wild boars in western Poland is a concern for Germany, Europe’s top pork producer with approximately 26 million pigs. Germany is also the EU’s second largest pork exporter to non-EU markets, after Spain. Most German exports go to China, South Korea and Japan. Should any of those markets – China in particular – classify Germany as an ASF country, it could herald a major crisis for the German pork industry.

That would also spell trouble for Polish pork producers: a Chinese ban on German pork could lead to it flooding the EU market, depressing prices.

Wild boar spreading disease
But ASF on pig farms is just one source of potential problems for German pork producers. Another – and more serious – is wild boars, over which there is much less control. There have been more than 1,600 ASF cases in wild boars in 2020 in Poland to date, only 600 fewer than in the whole of 2019, according to data from the General Veterinary Inspectorate.

Poland passed a special law on containing ASF in December last year that gave Polish hunting associations new powers in culling wild boar.

But the hunting associations are regularly accused of disregarding safety measures and helping, rather than curbing, the spread of the disease. In early 2020, private broadcaster TVN24 allegedly exposed the lax biosecurity measures of one of the hunting associations, prompting a criminal investigation.

The German states of Brandenburg and Saxony have both recently built fences along the border with Poland to prevent wild boars from entering.

German forest workers set up an electric wildlife fence on the border between eastern Germany and western Poland to prevent wild boars spreading African swine fever.
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German forest workers set up an electric wildlife fence on the border between eastern Germany and western Poland to prevent wild boars spreading African swine fever. Photograph: Hayoung Jeon/EPA
“Jumps over large distances in the disease spread (eg within Poland, to Belgium, Hungary, the Czech Republic) clearly show the existing risk of introduction into Germany through human activity. The Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI) is especially concerned about the situation in wild boar in Poland as the last cases are only about 10km from the German border,” said Elke Reinking, a spokesperson for FLI, Germany’s federal research institute for animal health.

About 10 European countries are currently suffering from ASF, the most recent being Greece, where the first case was recorded in early February in the region of Serres, close to Bulgaria and North Macedonia.

China has ‘very serious problem’ with ASF

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In China, authorities have launched a 60-day campaign until 1 June to crack down on improper or illegal transportation of pigs to reduce ASF transmission.

An unnamed ministry of agriculture official said last week that China has had no widespread ASF outbreaks in the first three months of the year, though there have been eight local outbreaks leading to the death of 738 pigs.

Two recent cases occurred in Gansu province in north-central China in March and early April where trucks illegally transporting piglets to other provinces were detected at toll booths. In one case authorities said that 67 out of 110 piglets died of the illness.

A similar incident happened in Chongqing, a major municipality in central China in which 67 out of 298 piglets illegally brought into the area died, according to an 5 April report from state-run media. The reports did not say if the surviving pigs were culled.

Some areas are also stepping up measures for containing ASF by requiring larger-scale slaughtering operations alongside an overall push for bigger, more centralised farms.

Hebei province, which surrounds the capital Beijing, announced on 7 April that it will now forbid pig slaughtering facilities with capacities of less than 150,000 pigs per year.

A quarantined pig farm in Hebei, outside Beijing. The ongoing outbreak in China has already wiped out 40% of pigs in the country.
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A quarantined pig farm in Hebei, outside Beijing. The ongoing outbreak in China has already wiped out 40% of pigs in the country. Photograph: Pak Yiu/AFP/Getty Images
The agriculture ministry stated in late March that “incidence of African swine flu was significantly lower” over the first three months of 2020 compared to the same period a year before, with only 324 pigs officially culled in that period.

Others who have followed the outbreak closely are less optimistic that China has a handle on the outbreak.

“China is still having very, very serious problems with African swine fever and the government has done absolutely nothing that has been effective,” said Wayne Johnson, a veterinarian at farm services company Enable Agricultural Technology Consulting, who is based in Beijing.

“They could have stopped it early but they did nothing,” said Johnson. “They even forbade people to test for it. There are pigs going to the slaughterhouse every day with ASF. They don’t clean the trucks. The local governments refused to diagnose it as African swine fever, because if they did, they would have to pay an indemnity since the law is that they now have to pay if the farm has ASF.”


ISTR that Holland and Denmark have also erected border fences to try to keep out the dirty feral pigs. But I can't remember the details.

Remember the foot and mouth outbreak of 2001 ? That started in pigs too.
 
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Sharpie

Well-Known Member
Send some down to fife or Stirling.
Is this really what you are suggesting ?

From my quote.

Jumps over large distances in the disease spread (eg within Poland, to Belgium, Hungary, the Czech Republic) clearly show the existing risk of introduction into Germany through human activity
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
Sharpie, are you aware of the provenance of all (100%) of the known wild/feral pigs in the country?

I'm aware of a fair few which are reckoned to be Tamworth cross, etc., but can you for example say when and where, eg the Glenlivet or Wyvis populations, or indeed several others came from?

Officially, of course you may be correct, but there is a difference in thinking and knowing, for example: SNH are busy here trapping and neutering any cat that looks like a wild cat, on somewhat dubious and hotly disputed genetic 'purity' criteria by those who do know about these matters, all the while leaving what are clearly feral moggies alone and unmolested; they think they're helping the wild cat, but to the general public, any classically marked wild-looking cat is de facto a wildcat as far as they are concerned. The 'experts' in the field disagree as to whether these wild-looking and acting cats should be given the living extinction service, especially given there are reckoned to be insufficient examples of the genuine article (distinguishable only by blood test from the ones they are meanwhile effectively destroying, in a bid to "save" the "Pure" examples which when found are to be brought into captivity (another life sentence) for participation in an as yet unproven programme of captive breeding followed by release back into the wild of the young cats thus bred, albeit in the SNH's preferred habitat areas ( as opposed to where they are currently being found, trapped and removed if suitable 'breeders').

Thinking and knowing, they can be tricky customers, hence my query re same as regards sus scrofa.
 

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