Driven boar caliber

bbrc

Well-Known Member
From time to time I have read that minimum calibers or energy are required in some countries on the continent for driven boar.
As I fancy one day trying a trip on driven boar on the continent, I don't want to limit where I could go.
Does anyone know which countries specify which as a minimum? or perhaps a link to the information?
Thanks
 

Lateral

Well-Known Member
From time to time I have read that minimum calibers or energy are required in some countries on the continent for driven boar.
As I fancy one day trying a trip on driven boar on the continent, I don't want to limit where I could go.
Does anyone know which countries specify which as a minimum? or perhaps a link to the information?
Thanks
Generally 7mm is considered the minimum, and some will request a minimum bullet weight.

If you already have a 7mm or bigger, you should be fine, but check with the agent. Most would look at a 308, 180gn, or bigger, 30-06, 300WM, 9.3x62.
 

bullet chucker

Well-Known Member
I read some where 6.5 was allowed but not in all countries in Europe, also there is an issue now with lead ammo but I am not able to quote the exact details.

BC.
 

bbrc

Well-Known Member
Thank you for your input gentlemen.
I think it seems 30 cal is my safest bet, Claret Dabbler has got a point, had a 30-06 years ago and loved it, good excuse for replacing it!
 

Lateral

Well-Known Member
I think you need work hard to construct a very solid argument in favour of any answer other than 30/06......
If you're only going to have one larger calibre rifle, then I would tend to agree, the 30-06 is hard to beat. However, like David, the 9.6x62 is a very, very good driven calibre.

That said, I have a yearning for an 8x68 :doh:
 

Uncle f

Well-Known Member
6.5 min in Portugal. I use 30.06 and get on fine with it but would also agree that 8x57, 9.3x64 or indeed all the magnum calibres are equally as good
each to there own they will all do the job bullet placement is the key, harder with driven shooting though

good luck
 

finnbear270

Well-Known Member
The .270 Finnbear will be going back for another trip this November, shot my first ever Boar (In Germany) with its original Bofors barrel on it, this time it's printing just great with Barnes X through James's re barrel.:tiphat:
 

stubear

Well-Known Member
The various restrictions I've heard of in Europe are a) a minimum of .30 cal, b) a minimum of 10 gram bullet weight and c) a minimum of 2000J energy (about 1500ft/lb) of energy 100m from the muzzle. Some countries do also have a requirement for non toxic bullets as well.

Not every country has these and not every country has all of them, but I figure if you have a round that can meet all of the above then you should be fine.

Basically .308, .30-06, 9.3x62, .45-70 etc...

Of the rifles I have in my cabinet now I would take my Win Mag. If I could sneak another rifle in past 'er indoors I would get a .45-70 underlever, which has the added bonus of being a fantastic rifle for close in woodland stalking. Nice big heavy slow bullet which wont get smashed to bits on a branch and wont do loads of meat damage like a smaller faster bullet.

With a modern rifle and stout hand loads you're probably running a bit more energy that .30-06 and a bit less that .300WM, and with the underlever mechanism you can do a nice quick reload as well. Perfect.
 

sikamalc

Administrator
Site Staff
The various restrictions I've heard of in Europe are a) a minimum of .30 cal, b) a minimum of 10 gram bullet weight and c) a minimum of 2000J energy (about 1500ft/lb) of energy 100m from the muzzle. Some countries do also have a requirement for non toxic bullets as well.

Not every country has these and not every country has all of them, but I figure if you have a round that can meet all of the above then you should be fine.

Basically .308, .30-06, 9.3x62, .45-70 etc...

Of the rifles I have in my cabinet now I would take my Win Mag. If I could sneak another rifle in past 'er indoors I would get a .45-70 underlever, which has the added bonus of being a fantastic rifle for close in woodland stalking. Nice big heavy slow bullet which wont get smashed to bits on a branch and wont do loads of meat damage like a smaller faster bullet.

With a modern rifle and stout hand loads you're probably running a bit more energy that .30-06 and a bit less that .300WM, and with the underlever mechanism you can do a nice quick reload as well. Perfect.
Careful Stu, some on here will say you are tending towards being a cowboy with an underlever, its bad enough with having a revolver, but an underlever heaven forbid!!!:rolleyes::D
 

8x57

Distinguished Member
If I could sneak another rifle in past 'er indoors I would get a .45-70 underlever, which has the added bonus of being a fantastic rifle for close in woodland stalking. Nice big heavy slow bullet which wont get smashed to bits on a branch and wont do loads of meat damage like a smaller faster bullet.

With a modern rifle and stout hand loads you're probably running a bit more energy that .30-06 and a bit less that .300WM, and with the underlever mechanism you can do a nice quick reload as well. Perfect.
See if you can try a .45-70 underlever before you seriously consider buying Stu, you might not long for one after shooting one.
I know a couple of site members who own or have owned such rifles and I'm sure that they will tell you that a modern .45-70 load in a Marlin underlever produces a fairly stout amount of recoil.
The cartridge would no doubt be fine for purpose but combined with such a lightweight rifle the experience isn't pleasurable.
 

finnbear270

Well-Known Member
Muzzle flash in early / late light situations would be a problem too, Also some Marlins of more recent construction can need some tuning with regard cartridge feeding.
 

stubear

Well-Known Member
Careful Stu, some on here will say you are tending towards being a cowboy with an underlever, its bad enough with having a revolver, but an underlever heaven forbid!!!:rolleyes::D
I already have the penchant for country music mate, might as well go the whole hog haha!


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stubear

Well-Known Member
See if you can try a .45-70 underlever before you seriously consider buying Stu, you might not long for one after shooting one.
I know a couple of site members who own or have owned such rifles and I'm sure that they will tell you that a modern .45-70 load in a Marlin underlever produces a fairly stout amount of recoil.
The cartridge would no doubt be fine for purpose but combined with such a lightweight rifle the experience isn't pleasurable.
I’d definitely be interested to try one that’s for sure. I’m not massively recoil shy being 16st and over 6ft tall - I have a reasonable amount of mass to soak it up haha!

But I do take your point - no point in buying something that’s horrible to shoot and just ends up sat in the cabinet all the time!


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8x57

Distinguished Member
Stu its not a matter of being recoil shy its more to do with the shape and length of the stock with the Marlin. I dare say that a .45-70 in a bolt action or double rifle would be a much nicer rifle to shoot than the Marlin underlever when shot free style.

Finnbear had or possibly still has a.45-70 Marlin and I genuinely felt sorry for him watching him subject himself to so much abuse when shooting that rifle. The horrendous muzzle blast is something to behold. He also I believe had a bit of a problem keeping a scope intact on the rifle for a while. Perhaps that's why he is taking his trusty .270 on his next boar trip.
 

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