Have teckles been bred to keep a deer at bay... ?

Marnie M

Active Member
skipping the tracking, scenting discussion. does anyone know or have experienced teckles keeping deer singular (or indeed plural), at bay. Or, from your experience, would they insanely lay into one?

Can anyone confirm they could have been bred for rounding deer towards the shooter? I can't believe they are just tracking dogs.
 

Jagare

Well-Known Member
As said bred for badgers. In Sweden they are used for roe hunting in the main i have hunted a few places where they were used to move red and fallow. They are used less so for fox, badger underground. Its not unknown for them to hunt moose but those that do have a short life span as a moose will bay and them stomp the teckle. The wire haired is the most popular for roe hunting followed by the short hair. Long hair teckles are mostly kept for pets. Teckles don't drive deer to the hunter. The hunter must know his ground and position themself where the deer are likely to run. Its about knowing your hunting ground.
 

Cadex

Well-Known Member
I had a badly shot roe buck turn and have a go at my GWP last season, had never seen that before.
Needless to say the wirehair wasn't impressed.

A teckle could have been in trouble in similar circumstances.
 

th32

Well-Known Member
In the last roe rut I shot a buck with the last light. Next morning I tried to track it with my teckel, it was too thick and covered and we didn't succeed with the lead. I decided to let her go while I got back to the corn field where I took the shot and waited for her. Ten or so minutes later, I heard her barking. I ran into the wood and found her coming back for me. She then turned back anf took me to the buck. I just touched his shoulder superficially. She kept it at bay until I had the chance to dispatch the buck.

I trained her for tracking deer and boar, but I didn't know she would react like that in such sitatuion. I was delighted with her, not with my poor shooting. Hope this experience helps.

Cheers.
 

countrryboy

Well-Known Member
I think they were actually bred for 'drawing' the badger, which was a different sport to digging it. I think u would send ur terriers down first and dig to the broc then call the terriers off and put the teckel in and u would pull the teckel and badger out together. I think back in the day some pubs woulld have artifical setts/a pipe and they would put a badger in and bet on which teckel would draw it out. The badgers werenae really harmed and released again (not like ur more modern sort of 'baiting')
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
I think that they are ideally worked alongside a larger dog such as a Gwp or Labrador etc that is capable of taking the pig or deer down and either holding it down or breaking it's back neck or throat.
From what I have been told and seen in Germany, they are super little things for blood scenting. I've always liked them apart from their high cost to buy and their progressive back problems. I don't think I'd have time to help a dog over every step and fallen tree !

Kind regards, Olaf
 

mchughcb

Well-Known Member
Why help a dog over a fallen tree? Believe or not they smart enough to go under or around if they can't jump it and they can very well for their size.
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
Why help a dog over a fallen tree? Believe or not they smart enough to go under or around if they can't jump it and they can very well for their size.

Yes, I agree, they are very smart and bold dogs, but, they are genetically engeneered midgets and sadly have spines that don't take too well to being bent too much and thus develop back problems easily.....
I'd love to own one day .....maybe
 

mchughcb

Well-Known Member
They have dwarfism. You want midget get a Chihuahua.

Never had problems with my dogs after 5 years just don't let them get over weight.
 

mchughcb

Well-Known Member
I think that they are ideally worked alongside a larger dog such as a Gwp or Labrador etc that is capable of taking the pig or deer down and either holding it down or breaking it's back neck or throat.
From what I have been told and seen in Germany, they are super little things for blood scenting. I've always liked them apart from their high cost to buy and their progressive back problems. I don't think I'd have time to help a dog over every step and fallen tree !

Kind regards, Olaf

They can climb fallen trees and jump if they want to. The wirehair believes it is superman.
 

Olaf

Well-Known Member
They can climb fallen trees and jump if they want to. The wirehair believes it is superman.

brilliant ! I like it :rofl:
The one in the first picture looks like it can fly too, amazing ! I bet that's why they have such long ears !
lovely looking dogs.

Kind regards, Olaf
 

stevenedwards

Well-Known Member
My mini complains about cold,wet,fences,undergrowth in fact most things right up until I get the rifle out. When sitting out or up a high seat in cold weather she is also useful as a hot water bottle.
 

martijn

Well-Known Member
They have been and are used for getting foxes and badgers out from their burrows. but are just as adapted to flush deer and other game from woodlands. having owned a dachsen for years I can personally guarantee they are fearless and actually drive anything towards you. rabbits deer and even whole packs of wild boar (that is actually less funny). now a days they are mostly used for tracking shot or injured boar and deer. plus side is that they are fast on their feet (despite the size) can go through dense shrubs and will easily corner an animal without getting mauled. (especially boar) plus they are spurlaut, meaning they bark like hell when they are on the scent so it is easy to track their position (especially since you dont see it in shrubs).

word of advice, you will hate it as often as you love it, as they are brave as a lion, think they are as strong and big as a bear but as stubborn as a deaf donkey sometimes! (especially when they have gotten hold of a boar and will not let it go)
 

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