How do you go about restoring/customising an old Mauser 98

Acm

Well-Known Member
Hi all, as most of the people who will want to read this thread already know, I'm the happy owner of a 1915 wartime action Mauser 98 in.275 with English sporter stock, folding leaf express sights and the proper old flag safety. Sadly though this isn't the original flag safety so I need to get that sorted.
My question is, how does one go about restoring or modernising it. Short of just paying someone to do it. Where do you start, what do you do? Etc etc etc
sadly the actions been tapped and drilled for a scope, it's been done quite elegantly and I must admit does make the rifle much more usable.

Look ok forward to hearing from you all.
 

bewsher500

Well-Known Member
not that tricky if you are patient have a few tools and willing to read a lot!

many missing items that you mention are easily sourced as they are not fashionable
rear sights, leaf sights, bolt parts, variety of stock parts etc etc

despite its heresy I would always go with a scope if only for usability and resale value. its a sporter afterall not a military restoration piece

rifle restoration project
 

alberta boy

Well-Known Member
What do you have in mind ? There are sorts of after market upgrades available , or do you want to restore the rifle to original condition ? Classic old rifle by the way , I'd love to pick up something like that , but there aren't many out my way .

AB
 

welshwarrior

Well-Known Member
I start with the metal then woodwork then reassemble all parts are about or can be made its just then time a skill if you lack either then you need to pay some one.

Pm if I can help with any bits.
 

Southern

Well-Known Member
thanks all, luckily for me its a good shooter. groups about 1 inch at 100 yards
That's a good start!
It obviously has good chamber, barrel, and sights.

So what do you want to change? Can you just refinish the stock, or do you want to replace it with a new one in the style of that period? Machined and inletted stocks in English and Oberndorf stocks of the 1920s are available in the USA, in various grades of wood. Most stocks of that era would be not highly figured, with straight grain, not stained, and many with no checkering, steel buttplates. I have an 8x60S from that same vintage, and a later 1937 Sporting Mauser in 8x57IS with checkering and hard rubber buttplate. Reproductions of these buttplates are available in hard rubber and plastic.

You could have the metal stripped and hot blued by a gunsmith, but if it has a grey or plum patina, you may want to leave that and just touch up some spots with Brownell's Oxy cold blue, which is really a super cold blue.

A 7x57 that shoots that well is all you need for deer hunting to 200 yards, with standard loads of 139-gr bullets at 2,650 FPS, so I would not think of drilling it for a scope if had not already been drilled. The only really vintage mounts would be German claw mounts, which are expensive. I have several vintage Mausers and 1903 Springfield sporters with German claw mounts, Griffin & Howe and Paul Jaeger side mounts, and the vintage Hensoldt, Kahles, Zeiss and Lyman scopes in them - and I would never replace them with modern ones.
 

SDC7x57

Well-Known Member
Give Erwin Peumans at Alan Rhone a call. They stock a lot of the Recknagel gear for Mauser 98s. Scope mounting is not difficult and you can find lots of older scopes online which don't look out of place on such a rifle. My own one is a take-down, built around the First World War by Dan'l Fraser in Edinburgh on an Oberndorf action, and is also .275. It has an early Pecar scope fitted on Recknagel tip-off mounts and still puts a 140g bullet right on the spot comfortably out to 200yds.

Hope you have success with your project as they're a cracking rifle.
 

Greener Jim

Well-Known Member
Give Erwin Peumans at Alan Rhone a call. They stock a lot of the Recknagel gear for Mauser 98s. Scope mounting is not difficult and you can find lots of older scopes online which don't look out of place on such a rifle. My own one is a take-down, built around the First World War by Dan'l Fraser in Edinburgh on an Oberndorf action, and is also .275. It has an early Pecar scope fitted on Recknagel tip-off mounts and still puts a 140g bullet right on the spot comfortably out to 200yds.

Hope you have success with your project as they're a cracking rifle.
This really needs a phot posted :) could only be better if it were a Dan'l Fraser falling block.
 

SDC7x57

Well-Known Member
Greener Jim - will gladly post a photo for you when I figure out how to do it!! Will have a go.....
 

SDC7x57

Well-Known Member
Greener JIm.....here goes :old:P1020347.JPGP1020348.JPGP1020349.jpgP1020350.JPGP1020351.JPGP1020352.JPG
Last pic shows the trimmed bolt and also that the flip up peep sight has been removed from the dovetail on the back of the bolt - too scared I lose it! Sorry the pics are not great - I'll improve with some practice, I hope....!
 

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